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Why can I hit an ancient tiny blade better then my new Callaway Irons?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

A friend of my fathers had an old Wilson Arnold Palmer "Autographed" 2 iron. I think it's from the 60's or 70's. I tried it at the range a few nights ago and hit it OK. So I took it out on the course. On shots where I wanted less then driver or 3W, I decided to try it. It's a tiny little head, have no clue about the shaft specs, but it's the easiest club I have ever hit. 225 with a tight draw, and a decent roll out. Why???? I am a 15 HCP, and you would think it would be a disaster.

 

I have noticed that when i have tried other more pro irons with smaller heads, I do hit them well. A tad shorter, yet I attribute some of that to the more forgiving models having supped up lofts. 

 

I am just curious why it would be easier to hit such a tiny club compared to a big modern forgiving club of today. 

 

 

Thanks for any light you can shed. 

 

Jamie Miller

post #2 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRM4440 View Post
 

A friend of my fathers had an old Wilson Arnold Palmer "Autographed" 2 iron. I think it's from the 60's or 70's. I tried it at the range a few nights ago and hit it OK. So I took it out on the course. On shots where I wanted less then driver or 3W, I decided to try it. It's a tiny little head, have no clue about the shaft specs, but it's the easiest club I have ever hit. 225 with a tight draw, and a decent roll out. Why???? I am a 15 HCP, and you would think it would be a disaster.

 

I have noticed that when i have tried other more pro irons with smaller heads, I do hit them well. A tad shorter, yet I attribute some of that to the more forgiving models having supped up lofts. 

 

I am just curious why it would be easier to hit such a tiny club compared to a big modern forgiving club of today. 

 

 

Thanks for any light you can shed. 

 

Jamie Miller

 

Perhaps the smaller head makes you focus on making sure you have center contact???

post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRM4440 View Post
 

A friend of my fathers had an old Wilson Arnold Palmer "Autographed" 2 iron. I think it's from the 60's or 70's. I tried it at the range a few nights ago and hit it OK. So I took it out on the course. On shots where I wanted less then driver or 3W, I decided to try it. It's a tiny little head, have no clue about the shaft specs, but it's the easiest club I have ever hit. 225 with a tight draw, and a decent roll out. Why???? I am a 15 HCP, and you would think it would be a disaster.

 

I have noticed that when i have tried other more pro irons with smaller heads, I do hit them well. A tad shorter, yet I attribute some of that to the more forgiving models having supped up lofts. 

 

I am just curious why it would be easier to hit such a tiny club compared to a big modern forgiving club of today. 

 

 

Thanks for any light you can shed. 

 

Jamie Miller

Judging from prior posts on the subject this won't be a popular answer but here goes anyway.

 

The small blade has less MOI between the shaft and the end of the toe of the club, making it easier to square up the club.

 

Second type of MOI in this article.

http://golf.about.com/od/faqs/f/moi.htm

post #4 of 12
None of the above. You hit it well for a very short period of time. Let it go. Next time you'll hate it and shank the bejesus outta it.
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

2 rounds and a range session, and not a shank as of yet. 

post #6 of 12
post #7 of 12

You concentrate better when you hit, you know you have to or you will not make good contact, so you do. 

post #8 of 12

Instant feedback IMO. Modern clubs are very forgiving and can have you thinking you've hit a nice one and its actually not at all....Blades have no such trouble letting you know you actually just hacked one and it scuttles 40 yds left BUT it does reward good ball striking every time and gets you focused on the result rather than the process ie. you know you must hit it flush and suddenly you've forgotten that its uphill into the wind and a tight pin,your'e just thinking about the feedback from the swing and resulting contact,nothing else,a good thing I think.I use a set of classic 80's Wilson blades and love them,I just cant stand over a chunky ping or callaway and feel right.All my problems come off the tee with a massive headed modern driver that cost me so much I have to persevere with it!!To those that say only "good" players can use blades I say no,good players are good at scoring well,scrambling,course management etc etc plenty of decent players with good eye hand co ordination can flush a blade but that doesn't mean you'll par every other hole.I say buy it of the guy and enjoy it!

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by thefinlex View Post

Instant feedback IMO. Modern clubs are very forgiving and can have you thinking you've hit a nice one and its actually not at all....Blades have no such trouble letting you know you actually just hacked one and it scuttles 40 yds left BUT it does reward good ball striking every time and gets you focused on the result rather than the process ie. you know you must hit it flush and suddenly you've forgotten that its uphill into the wind and a tight pin,your'e just thinking about the feedback from the swing and resulting contact,nothing else,a good thing I think.I use a set of classic 80's Wilson blades and love them,I just cant stand over a chunky ping or callaway and feel right.All my problems come off the tee with a massive headed modern driver that cost me so much I have to persevere with it!!To those that say only "good" players can use blades I say no,good players are good at scoring well,scrambling,course management etc etc plenty of decent players with good eye hand co ordination can flush a blade but that doesn't mean you'll par every other hole.I say buy it of the guy and enjoy it!

I agree to an extent. A little exaggeration on the forgiveness of modern clubs though. You make it sound like anyone can go out and fire wind piercing shots down the fairway with a Ping or Callaway. Hitting a great shot with a GI iron is every bit as commendable as hitting one with a blade. Appearance can be important to many though. You don't like the "clunky" Ping or Callaway just as I don't like seeing a Pringles chip attached to a stick.

People aren't out there hitting shots off the toe and sticking it solid nor the heel and sailing it high and pretty. Golf is hard enough without using a club that minimizes your chances, however little the margin may be.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRM4440 View Post
 

2 rounds and a range session, and not a shank as of yet.

Well, it's clear that you were born in the wrong era.

.

Enjoy it and see if you can make it last. :-)

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinsk View Post


I agree to an extent. A little exaggeration on the forgiveness of modern clubs though. You make it sound like anyone can go out and fire wind piercing shots down the fairway with a Ping or Callaway. Hitting a great shot with a GI iron is every bit as commendable as hitting one with a blade. Appearance can be important to many though. You don't like the "clunky" Ping or Callaway just as I don't like seeing a Pringles chip attached to a stick.

People aren't out there hitting shots off the toe and sticking it solid nor the heel and sailing it high and pretty. Golf is hard enough without using a club that minimizes your chances, however little the margin may be.

Fair comment,I wasn't meaning to be as blunt as it may of come across,just feel that the general consensus that blades are only for elite players is harsh and that genuine game improvement can be hindered for some by clubs designed to hide your faults and "help" you...that said I agree that any great shot hit with any club is a complete buzz and keeps us all coming back next week in search of the perfect round.I like the pringles reference too! they usually get called butter knives! I have been acused of being into S&M when it comes to golf and do like it being a hard challenge all the same.

post #12 of 12
Lol! Well said.
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