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Getting tired after 12-13 holes?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hey Guys
Was able to play sat and sun this weekend. I am currently a 25 handicap. Sat I shot 104 blew up the last 4 holes and noticed my swing started to break down. Sunday broke 90 for the first time and went 85, same thing swing broke down but was able to recognize it and put the driver away and tried to keep it together last 4 holes... I was able to ... Wondering if my body is getting tired the last 5-6 holes???
post #2 of 20

I always bring some beef jerky and granola bars along with me in my bag for just this reason. Around the 13-14th hole I start to get hungry and make some silly mistakes that I wouldn't make otherwise. A couple pieces of jerky and a granola bar (it's the best if the jerky is homemade elk jerky) and I can keep going just fine.

post #3 of 20
Yep. I bring jerky, power bars or trail mix . Plus plenty of drinks. I played 36 holes today. I walked in 95 degree heat. Man how stupid. Every part of my body was soaked with sweat. I shot 73 the first 18. I was even thru 16 holes on the second 18 and bogeyed the last two holes. It was sheer exhaustion. I three putted the 17th hole from about 15 feet. I left my first putt 3 feet short. Sweat was running in my eyes and pouring down my nose as I was putting. I'm getting a cart next time.
post #4 of 20

Quick question (wich relates to me aswell), do you carry or use a trolley?

I´ve always carried my bag and like you, often have a breakdown around  hole 12-14.. just recently started to rent a push-cart when it was warm (above 23*C, im cold-blooded :p ) and actually felt so good with it I ended up buying one to have when it´s warm or i feel low on energy in before hand.

post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
I do walk also, but this weekend was a cart both days?
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris08527 View Post

I do walk also, but this weekend was a cart both days?

You are still working your body a lot.  If it was hot and humid, even more so.  I will get fatigued near the end of an 18 hole round if it is warm.

post #7 of 20

One Aleve or generic substitute taken right before a round kicks in by the middle of the back nine to alleviate the tired achiness I feel which sometimes sabotages my swing.

post #8 of 20

I had a similar problem this weekend. I played 27 holes, and I shot a 48 that I was very happy with going out, but the climb up to 9 and walking over to 10 are kinda heavy, and was a bit winded. Made an absolute mess of 10-12, and the rest of the back 9 wasn't great either. I replayed the back 9 right after (it was twilight) and shot a 45. I will credit the fact that I took a hit of 5 hour energy before the 14th hole in the middle nine holes. I figure it took a little bit to kick in and I felt really great. Not to be a commercial for the product (I actually use the Costco brand version of it), but it's something to consider. I always have one in my bag. Walking with a pushcart on a hilly course just naturally leads to some lulls in energy. Couple that with mental lapses (I absolutely went on tilt on 10 and 11, OBing tee shots and having a bit of a case of the shanks), and it's a matter of having the detached wherewithal of recognizing when your focus and energy is flagging and adjusting accordingly. 

post #9 of 20
I struggle with this too but haven't found a complete fix yet. Lately, I've tried avoiding the driving range the day before I plan on playing just to keep the mileage down on the body. I also keep off the range the day after a round just to give myself time to recover. On the plus side, forcing myself not to go to the range gives me an excuse to practice my chipping/pitching on those days which has helped.
post #10 of 20

I always take 5 Hour Energy at the turn to prevent back 9 fatigue.

post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris08527 View Post

Hey Guys
Was able to play sat and sun this weekend. I am currently a 25 handicap. Sat I shot 104 blew up the last 4 holes and noticed my swing started to break down. Sunday broke 90 for the first time and went 85, same thing swing broke down but was able to recognize it and put the driver away and tried to keep it together last 4 holes... I was able to ... Wondering if my body is getting tired the last 5-6 holes???

hardly ever although physique is a very common excuse for foul gaming abilities. it's a good industry booster too.

post #12 of 20
Guys, really? I'll be 60 next month. I walk, and carry my bag, around my 6400 yard, hilly, home course. Last Tuesday I played 36 holes. It was only about 23 degrees (75F) which may not be hot by American standards, but still... . I was playing as well, or as badly, at the end as I was when I teed off in the morning.

Golf is just a walk, it's impossible for me to take it seriously as exercise. If I want exercise, I go out on my bike. If you're fatigued after pushing a trolley round 18 holes, I'd suggest you do something about your level of fitness.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by chasm View Post
 
 
Guys, really? I'll be 60 next month. I walk, and carry my bag, around my 6400 yard, hilly, home course. Last Tuesday I played 36 holes. It was only about 23 degrees (75F) which may not be hot by American standards, but still... . I was playing as well, or as badly, at the end as I was when I teed off in the morning.

Golf is just a walk, it's impossible for me to take it seriously as exercise. If I want exercise, I go out on my bike. If you're fatigued after pushing a trolley round 18 holes, I'd suggest you do something about your level of fitness.

I lift heavy (in excess of 400lbs on certain exercises)  3 times a week, run 4-5 miles every other day and I say carrying your golf bag for 18 holes is exercise.

post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elvisliveson View Post

I lift heavy (in excess of 400lbs on certain exercises)  3 times a week, run 4-5 miles every other day and I say carrying your golf bag for 18 holes is exercise.

Well, let's not argue about semantics. But as someone who is reasonably fit, do you really regard a round of golf as an endurance test? I certainly don't. I eat when I'm hungry, I stay hydrated, the idea that walking four or five miles degrades my performance is ridiculous to me.
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by chasm View Post


Well, let's not argue about semantics. But as someone who is reasonably fit, do you really regard a round of golf as an endurance test? I certainly don't. I eat when I'm hungry, I stay hydrated, the idea that walking four or five miles degrades my performance is ridiculous to me.

As somone who is more than just reasonably fit, I would still say of course it's somewhat of an endurance test and I can understand why some people would be looking for ways to improve their performance in that regard. I'm certainly not going to act like they are being ridiculous just because it's not that big of a deal to me.

post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elvisliveson View Post

As somone who is more than just reasonably fit, I would still say of course it's somewhat of an endurance test and I can understand why some people would be looking for ways to improve their performance in that regard. I'm certainly not going to act like they are being ridiculous just because it's not that big of a deal to me.

Fair enough. But if youngish men are finding a round of golf is tiring them out, the answer is clear. They need to work on their physical conditioning.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by chasm View Post


Fair enough. But if youngish men are finding a round of golf is tiring them out, the answer is clear. They need to work on their physical conditioning.

I think you're missing part of the issue here, which I feel is that the fatigue most people feel is due (at least in part, if not more so) to the fact that most don't drink enough water or eat at all on the course. When a round lasts for 6 hours or more (which, unfortunately, is becoming more common over here) and you're not drinking larger quantities of water and eating something, you will become a bit tired. It's the equivalent of you going for an extended bike ride and only allowing yourself to drink the water bottle you brought without refilling it.

 

Some courses help out by having many water coolers or fountains on the course (my home course I feel does a decent job with a water cooler every 2-3 holes on the course), but on the courses that have nothing besides water at the clubhouse it can lead to big time dehydration. 75* Fahrenheit isn't that warm out here (most people are comfortable in their homes at between 68-72*) and the hot days get up to over 100* Fahrenheit or about 38* Celcius. If you go out in that kind of heat walking 18 holes and don't drink at least 80 oz of water (5 standard sized plastic water bottles) you will feel it. When it's that hot I usually end up drinking around 96 oz of water per nine holes (32 oz water bottle filled 3 times a side) and I sometimes am still thirsty at the end of the round.

 

As for the food issue, just think about it. If you eat lunch at noon and tee it up at 1, you can be out playing golf until 7. I know that in some countries in Europe a dinner at 7 would be considered early (France I know is this way, not sure about other places), but in the U.S. we tend to eat dinner sometime around 5 PM-7 PM. With a 6 hour round of golf you will find yourself around the 13-14th hole when 5 PM rolls around, a time when you would have dinner on an average day. Not only are you not eating at that time, but you've essentially taken a 3 mile hike (assuming the course is hilly) with a 20 lb backpack while swinging a club at high speeds in periodic intervals. Do you know of a single backpacker who wouldn't take at least a granola bar to eat if he plans to be gone for more than a couple hours? Even so, many golfer don't think of this and don't bring a granola bar or other light snacks.

 

As a final kick in the pants, golfers who prefer to drink alcohol while on the course make it worse on themselves in terms of drinking water. Alcohol has an effect on the pituitary gland that, in essence, makes you pee more. It works by reducing the levels of a hormone that lets your body know when it's dehydrated so that it'll stop peeing out your water, but the basic part is that alcohol helps contribute to dehydration fairly often. This means that people who are drinking will need to consume even more water to maintain a proper level of hydration, which already is not being met by many due to a number of factors including course infrastructure, thirst level (because you're drinking beer), and the fact that some don't even carry a water bottle and prefer to just drink from the paper cups at the water cooler (which will result in less water being consumed).

 

It's not that the people are out of shape so much as often times we let ourselves become dehydrated or hungry. Those two things can affect your golfing performance negatively.

post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by vangator View Post

Yep. I bring jerky, power bars or trail mix . Plus plenty of drinks. I played 36 holes today. I walked in 95 degree heat. Man how stupid. Every part of my body was soaked with sweat. I shot 73 the first 18. I was even thru 16 holes on the second 18 and bogeyed the last two holes. It was sheer exhaustion. I three putted the 17th hole from about 15 feet. I left my first putt 3 feet short. Sweat was running in my eyes and pouring down my nose as I was putting. I'm getting a cart next time.

 

 

Wow!!  I have walked 36 before, but not in 95 degree heat.  You must have lost 10 pounds.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chasm View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elvisliveson View Post

As somone who is more than just reasonably fit, I would still say of course it's somewhat of an endurance test and I can understand why some people would be looking for ways to improve their performance in that regard. I'm certainly not going to act like they are being ridiculous just because it's not that big of a deal to me.

Fair enough. But if youngish men are finding a round of golf is tiring them out, the answer is clear. They need to work on their physical conditioning.

 

I have to agree with @chasm here.

 

Edit:

 

Just read @Pretzel 's post.  

 

Unless you are not eating and drinking properly.  If I ride my bike any decent length, I have to make sure to eat something.

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