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Wedges

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I only have 2 wedges in my bag, a 44° PW and 50° GW should I add a wedge like 56-60°
post #2 of 13

Yes.  A high-bounce 56* sand wedge would be appropriate.

 

Anything more lofted than that will leave you with too much of a gap between it and your GW.

post #3 of 13
Yep, a 56* with lots of bounce can be incredibly versatile.
post #4 of 13

Yes, and remember bounce is your friend.:dance:

post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by HockeyGolfer18 View Post

I only have 2 wedges in my bag, a 44° PW and 50° GW should I add a wedge like 56-60°

Decide whether you want a lob wedge (60°). If so, you might want to get a 54° or 55° sand wedge. If not, a 56° or 58° would be appropriate. I have a 45° PW, a 52° GW, a 56° SW, and a 60° LW. 

post #6 of 13

HockeyGolfer18: What make and model irons/wedges are you playing?

post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
King cobra fp "08" 4-GW

Quote:
Originally Posted by dfreuter415 View Post

HockeyGolfer18: What make and model irons/wedges are you playing?
post #8 of 13
Quote:
HockeyGolfer18: What make and model irons/wedges are you playing?
Originally Posted by HockeyGolfer18 View Post
King cobra fp "08" 4-GW

I would recommend that you invest in a sand wedge 54°-56°.  You can find a number of King Cobra FP wedges, on websites like eBay or 2ndswing for a reasonable price.

 

There are any number of sand wedges available, but if you like your Cobra FP irons, I would try to find a matching sand wedge.

 

With a little practice, using a more lofted wedge around the green can do a lot to help your short game.

 

Good luck in making a decision.

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post
 

Yes.  A high-bounce 56* sand wedge would be appropriate.

 

Anything more lofted than that will leave you with too much of a gap between it and your GW.

I like this...

 

and don't worry about the label on the wedge -- a 44 is well, 44. The typical 44 and 50 do not have much versatility around the greens. A 56 typically has sufficient bounce and relief on the heel, toe, and/or trailing edge to offer more versatility.

post #10 of 13

This seems like a good place to ask this question. In regards to bounce, what does one look for and what is its purpose? I've only owned 2 sets of wedges on that I got 18 some odd years ago when i really didn't golf that much so probably wouldn't even know its effects and the set I currently own which is the TaylorMade atv wedges 54* and 58* neither sets have the bounce on them. I still don't golf a great amount of rounds nor is my game going to make me any kind of money but I am interested in the theory behind bounce and what it does. Also does anyone know what the bounce on my clubs would be???

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrownCoast View Post
 

This seems like a good place to ask this question. In regards to bounce, what does one look for and what is its purpose? I've only owned 2 sets of wedges on that I got 18 some odd years ago when i really didn't golf that much so probably wouldn't even know its effects and the set I currently own which is the TaylorMade atv wedges 54* and 58* neither sets have the bounce on them. I still don't golf a great amount of rounds nor is my game going to make me any kind of money but I am interested in the theory behind bounce and what it does. Also does anyone know what the bounce on my clubs would be???

Simply, bounce allows a club to glide along the turf. When you have sufficient bounce for your swing, it is forgiving. When you have insufficient bounce, your club can dig into the turf and stop.  Imagine using a club with a sharp leading edge and insufficient bounce - if you hit ground before ball, the club will dig like a knife into the turf, causing the ball to take off ... for a few yards.

 

This will give you an overview about the design of wedges, the sole and how bounce plays its part (forget the part about dimple grooves).

 

 

 

And here is Mark Crossfield with an explanation of bounce in general.

 

 

Camber also comes into play, although I know nothing about it. But here is a blurb I found:  Camber is the amount of arch in the sole of the wedge, both from the heel to the toe and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. Generally speaking, the greater the camber, the more forgiving the club when you hit off turf, although it has little effect on bunker shots.

 

If a player who tends to scoop the ball and often hits it fat tries to hit from a tight turf lie, the trailing edge of the wedge without camber will contact the ground first and cause the leading edge to bounce up—skulling the ball. A sole with a lot of camber tends to forgive the fat scoop. Camber from heel to toe adds forgiveness to shots off turf where the player must stand either above or below the ball. A wedge without camber will tend to dig in at the toe on lies above the feet, opening the clubface. A wedge without camber, playing a shot below the player's feet, will tend to dig in at the heel, closing the clubface.

___

 

As to your ATV's, they are one grind fits all, and my guess is that the theory is that how you setup at address will determine how much bounce will affect your shot at contact. So if you set with hands ahead of ball, you will use less bounce, hands with/or slightly ahead of ball uses full bounce, and hands behind ball adds bounce.

post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post
 

Simply, bounce allows a club to glide along the turf. When you have sufficient bounce for your swing, it is forgiving. When you have insufficient bounce, your club can dig into the turf and stop.  Imagine using a club with a sharp leading edge and insufficient bounce - if you hit ground before ball, the club will dig like a knife into the turf, causing the ball to take off ... for a few yards.

 

This will give you an overview about the design of wedges, the sole and how bounce plays its part (forget the part about dimple grooves).

 

 

 

And here is Mark Crossfield with an explanation of bounce in general.

 

 

Camber also comes into play, although I know nothing about it. But here is a blurb I found:  Camber is the amount of arch in the sole of the wedge, both from the heel to the toe and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. Generally speaking, the greater the camber, the more forgiving the club when you hit off turf, although it has little effect on bunker shots.

 

If a player who tends to scoop the ball and often hits it fat tries to hit from a tight turf lie, the trailing edge of the wedge without camber will contact the ground first and cause the leading edge to bounce up—skulling the ball. A sole with a lot of camber tends to forgive the fat scoop. Camber from heel to toe adds forgiveness to shots off turf where the player must stand either above or below the ball. A wedge without camber will tend to dig in at the toe on lies above the feet, opening the clubface. A wedge without camber, playing a shot below the player's feet, will tend to dig in at the heel, closing the clubface.

___

 

As to your ATV's, they are one grind fits all, and my guess is that the theory is that how you setup at address will determine how much bounce will affect your shot at contact. So if you set with hands ahead of ball, you will use less bounce, hands with/or slightly ahead of ball uses full bounce, and hands behind ball adds bounce.

Thank you, that is a step in the right direction for me. Truthfully I'm happy if I get the ball somewhat where I need it to go. but can't beat knowledge and the more one learns the better off they are so once again thank you

post #13 of 13

After watching the Edel wedge vid, looks I'ma have to save up for a couple of custom fit wedges. Looked on their website, which also convinced me.

 

So..thanks alot Mr. Desmond....:-P  :-D

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