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JeffB

Want to Be Good, But How?

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Finding the right instructor can make all the difference.  Just because 1 didn't work well for you, doesn't necessarily mean all will.  I took 4 lessons from a local Pro with a good Reputation and is the instructor for the local college. He didn't seem to really help me very much.  Just didn't fit me.  I found another instructor last year, and helped me more in one day than all the other instructors I've had combined.

 

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32 minutes ago, IowaGreg said:

Finding the right instructor can make all the difference.  Just because 1 didn't work well for you, doesn't necessarily mean all will.  I took 4 lessons from a local Pro with a good Reputation and is the instructor for the local college. He didn't seem to really help me very much.  Just didn't fit me.  I found another instructor last year, and helped me more in one day than all the other instructors I've had combined.

 

I agree with this completely. I’ve seen some high profile guys and a big YouTube instructor all with disappointing results. The latest instructor I’m with ( still recovering from injury so I’m out for now) has been by far the best. My Evolvr instructor has been excellent I’m just not as suited to online instruction as in person. But the information and priority pieces were the same with both instructors.

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So much to process here.  If you are truly starting out, I think lessons are a good way to go.  Find an instructor with a good reputation.  He/she should spend a few minutes talking to you before starting to learn about what you want top accomplish, and maybe a question about how you best learn something new.  Again if you are truly new, the first lessons should start out / focus on basics like setup - hard to swing well if you set up wrong.

Golf is something you need to practice to get better (unlike say tennis where there is sometimes a pro helping every time you practice).  If you truly want to get better, you likely need to play or hit the range at least 1-3 times a week.  You may want to favor the range more when you start and then play more as you are ready.

One thing that might help is to make sure you realize that all golfers make lots of bad shots.  Lots of them.  When I caught the bug, and I caught it really really bad, I was determined to play golf and I was determined that I was going to be at least be "average." I am fortunate that I somehow became better than average, but the reality is that what I thought an "average" golfer was back then is far better than the reality of what an "average" golfer is.

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1 hour ago, gbogey said:

So much to process here.  If you are truly starting out, I think lessons are a good way to go.  Find an instructor with a good reputation.  He/she should spend a few minutes talking to you before starting to learn about what you want top accomplish, and maybe a question about how you best learn something new.  Again if you are truly new, the first lessons should start out / focus on basics like setup - hard to swing well if you set up wrong.

Golf is something you need to practice to get better (unlike say tennis where there is sometimes a pro helping every time you practice).  If you truly want to get better, you likely need to play or hit the range at least 1-3 times a week.  You may want to favor the range more when you start and then play more as you are ready.

One thing that might help is to make sure you realize that all golfers make lots of bad shots.  Lots of them.  When I caught the bug, and I caught it really really bad, I was determined to play golf and I was determined that I was going to be at least be "average." I am fortunate that I somehow became better than average, but the reality is that what I thought an "average" golfer was back then is far better than the reality of what an "average" golfer is.

The key is what you expect. If you are trying to have fun and shoot 100. Just some range time might be enough.

If you want to shoot in the low 80s and break 80 I would suggest find a pro, take a "trial" lesson discuss what you want, the amount of time you have to practice, and see what they suggest. Key is if you communicate well and you believe that they can get you to that next level. You will likely go through some growing pains and believing in the instructor is key to staying the course.

I suggest a series of private lessons (1 every 1-4 weeks), plenty of practice time (range, drills or just set up), and having a feedback method.

When I first started I spent 1 week just working on gripping the club. I went through the process for 15 min 2-3 times a day until it felt right, then did the same thing with alignment using tape lines on the ground. 

Good luck in the journey. Investing in the right basics and fundamentals is a lot of work but will pay off huge.

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First thing's first, you've got the golf bug. Good! Next, you want to improve and know enough to ask for help. Also good. 

As one that has been playing and working in the golf biz for over 30 years, I'll start by sharing this. There is no such thing as having the perfect game/swing/technique. Even the legends of professional golf, Tiger, Hogan, Nicklaus, etc.. would agree.

Rather, playing golf to the level one expects of themself, is part purposeful practice, mixed with positive thought and unwavering confidence. 

Take a series of introductory lessons from a regarded teaching pro in your area. Watch the PGA Tour pros play on TV. Do some research about the greats of the past. Instead of tieing your brain in knots watching video after video, or reading countless magazine blurbs, compile your list of favorite professional players. If they've published an instructional book, read it. Again, don't follow the hype provided by the no-names your friend told you to watch on YouTube. 

On an entirely different tangent, you're 29. Are you secure in your career? I switched my career path at 27, and took a job at a private golf course. With unlimited access to play, my game SKYROCKETED! 

Just saying...

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A lot of ppl on here use evolvr with success. I took lessons from @iacas for a year now with success.

They have a system about how to practice and having one “priority piece” that you work on.

Search through the member swings. Look at the guys who use evolvr. Their swings look pretty good IMO.

You'll have one voice, giving you one thing to work on at a time

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