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Partition Wall in Garage?


saevel25
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My house was built in the 1960's. I need to put in a wall in the garage to isolate the new furnace from the rest of the garage. This will allow me to heat that part of the garage and keep the high efficiency furnace from having issues in the winter with freezing condensation in the air intake pipe that goes outside. 

I was wondering if anyone had any ideas on the best way to build this wall? I was thinking of just using cinder blocks and mortar. Then frame a door in there. 

Here are some photo's of the area the wall needs to go.

It would fit against the bump out just to the right of the new furnace. 

IMG_1439.jpeg

IMG_1437.jpeg

Thanks!

 

 

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7 hours ago, saevel25 said:

My house was built in the 1960's. I need to put in a wall in the garage to isolate the new furnace from the rest of the garage. This will allow me to heat that part of the garage and keep the high efficiency furnace from having issues in the winter with freezing condensation in the air intake pipe that goes outside. 

I was wondering if anyone had any ideas on the best way to build this wall? I was thinking of just using cinder blocks and mortar. Then frame a door in there. 

Here are some photo's of the area the wall needs to go.

It would fit against the bump out just to the right of the new furnace. 

IMG_1439.jpeg

IMG_1437.jpeg

Thanks!

 

 

What does the ceiling look like? It may be easier to frame a 2x4 wall and insulate it. You could frame around the duct work too.

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@saevel25 Matt here is a thought.
A. Build an enclosure which can be disassembled easily in the event the furnace needs servicing or replacement.
B. Use the 2" blue Styrofoam boards, with 2" metal channels. They are sold in 24" X 96" panels, 2" thick.
Assembly would be easy using the metal channel studs with screws.
Build the sections independently and fasten them together with flat or angle formed metal materials.     
The door can be a lightweight prefab type, I suggest having double doors for servicing.
Attached light gage metal angle or small clips to block wall, ceiling, and other areas required for framing to attach the panels.
Attach clips to the floor for support where needed.
The Styrofoam and metal products (channels, angles, etc.) is sold at any building supplies, Lowes, Menards, Home Depot.

The only tools required would be a cordless drill, metal snips, or metal cutoff blade for a chop saw, knife to cut foam.
Common screws and concrete fasters.
You can use 2X4's for support / framing for doors or wall support where required. 

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  • iacas changed the title to Partition Wall in Garage?
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I'd do what John said. It really won't require much insulation, either, because the furnace will generate heat of its own, the air will be warm, etc. Insulate the pipes, box in the furnace, it'll be fine. It's not like it has to be 70… 40° is plenty.

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57 minutes ago, saevel25 said:

B3CB5964-D3F9-4B08-998E-58B8C69451CC.jpeg
0510DB54-8C2F-4BA0-8958-4EF225D0FE42.jpeg

You should be able to find the joists in the ceiling. You could put a cross piece on the ceiling to support either a temporary wall, like @Club Rat discussed or something more permanent. Same with the cinder blocks. You could even put in a door if you’re ambitious enough. I’ve used the foam board John mentioned too, pretty easy to work with, but it has to be covered for fire code reasons. Sheet rock is okay or fiberglass board. I just did that in my crawl space. 

Because you are PE, I expect a full structural analysis from you. 😜

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Another thought. If your main concern is a means to keep the condensation from freezing in the exhaust PVC and PVC drain pipes,
then wrap them with heat tape and insulate also.
Heat tapes have thermostats and only come on when the temp is below freezing in the room.
Just make sure you install the tape with the sensor hanging out so it correctly senses air temp in the room.

When I worked in Colorado, I had seen many HE installations where the condensate would freeze at the termination point on the exterior and also once with the vent pipe installed routed in a garage which did freeze up.
When the vent pipe is clogged with ice, the furnace will not fire.
Frozen drains also will not permit the furnace to fire.
Both have sensors as a safety measure to prevent the furnace from operating with these situations which I am sure you are aware of.

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3 hours ago, Club Rat said:

Heat tapes have thermostats and only come on when the temp is below freezing in the room.
Just make sure you install the tape with the sensor hanging out so it correctly senses air temp in the room.

There you go.

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