Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
iacas

"The Impact Zone" by Bobby Clampett

164 posts / 150313 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

Very Very Very good book. If you "hit" at the ball, this book will open your eye's to how it is really done.

It has also changed the way I practice. No more pounding 100 balls on the range. All I do is pitch and chip working on my "forward swing bottom" 4 inches ahead of the ball. The difference in my ball striking is dramatic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just some fyi:

I Hit 12 of 14 fairways and 14 of 18 greens today and shot 76. All due to reading this book. That and putting much better w/ my new Spider putter. Moving my "forward swing bottom" has to be the best thing that has ever happened to me. Thank you Bobby Clampett!

The best part of this is that I don't spend any money on the range anymore. Just 3 balls, putter, and wedge. I hit about 30 pitches working on impact and it just translates to the full swing. I think the range ruins the golf swing b/c most amateurs don't have a clue as to what we are doing while practicing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This isn't from the book, but it shows what I'm talking about with the "Forward swing bottom".

could you explain how you now practice in more detail?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All I do is pitch, chip, and putt. The impact position of a pitch shot is the same as a full shot. So I focus on having the bottom of my swing occur as far to left of the ball as I can. Basically, instead of looking at the ball during the swing, as soon as I start my take away, I shift my eye's focus to a spot 3 to 4 inches ahead of the ball. Passive hands through impact. Twice a week I spend about an hour and a half. I usually take 3 balls to the practice green, wedge and putter. I pitch them up and putt them in from all sorts of places and distances. Keeping score. Getting up and down is Par, Pitching it close to within a club length is a birdie. I usually do this for 18 imaginary holes.

In the backyard, I just pitch about 40 balls to a bucket, working on the impact position of the flat back of the wrist and taking my divot ahead of the ball. I do the same thing when I play, with all full swings, chips, and pitches.

This has really worked for me in so many ways. I strike it better and more consistently during events or practice rounds, plus my short game has improved a bunch. No big secrets. Full swings on the practice range just don't lead to any improvement for me. Actually, I feel like it makes it worse. I just try to focus on what is important, impact, and let my subconscious handle the backswing and downswing.

I'll warm up on the range, but no more than 15-20 swings before I head to the practice green.

Also, it didn't take long for me to start seeing improvement. After the first session I noticed a difference. Go get the book, so you can understand what I'm referring too. Then try it out. You have nothing to lose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After reading "The Impact Zone," I began understanding the game much more than ever before. While I don't go as crazy with the pitch/chip practice as longfornothing, I spend 50-75% of my practices hitting half shots, only focusing on moving my forward swing bottom 4 inches in front of the ball and lagging my load. It creates a stress free practice environment and allows me to have more fun while playing.

The most important take away from the book is that the look of your swing is meaningless; once the fundamentals are mastered nobody will care what your swing looks like because you'll be hitting fairways and greens. And they'll be diving too deep into their wallets to pay out all the greenies, skins, wolfs, and cowboys you win ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished this book and I have to say, not a lot of new stuff here. In my opinion, the principles are good, especially the flat left wrist, but in reading reviews prior to purchase I was expecting more. I didn't find the description of the "aiming point" very adequate so that section completely missed for me. I'd recommend this book for beginner to intermediate level players primarily because of it's focus on a few basic fundamentals. Not that there isn't any value to more skilled players but as a long-time student of golf swing theory I found this relatively elementary. Pretty well written and some fun anecdotes from Clampett so not a waste of money by any means.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This book is excellent for intermediate and advanced golfers looking to get to about scratch or better. He talks about general "dynamics" you need to exhibit in your golf shot...not about positions and pivot styles. I have not had a chance to try out the forward aiming technique yet, but I do agree with his theory about the forward swing bottom. My only minor complaint is that the images are sometimes too small and the layout gives it a weird Microsoft Word feel. Overall one of the best books I have read because of his universal "dynamic" point of view.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is one of the best books to discuss the impact zone without "lag and drag pressure necessary for a 2 line delivery path"

I love the insight into golf's True Fundamentals: Divot, Lag, Pivot, Target Line. How you choose to address these is your unique pattern.

Its a little like a snowflake: They are all different falling down, but when they land and melt, they are all the same.

Swings are all different, but everyone takes a divot, creates lag through a pivot, and has a straight line to their target.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, I won't be able to put any of my reading of this book into practice for another 8 weeks or more, when the snow is gone. I generally liked the book, BUT, he makes the point early, which I get and think is very interesting, then the book wanders a bit from that, in my opinion. I thought there should have been a lot more photographs. He talks up all of the technology that allowed viewing of the swing at various positions, etc, but try and find some good photos at impact and just after in the book, there really aren't any, and it would have been so easy to include many more photos from different parts of the swings shown (and in color, why not?). I am anxious to put the information to use and try the drills discussed, I just think more thought put into showing what he means would have been helpful, because the narrative isn't always focused.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly. That's a good synopsis of what Bobby Clampett is preaching and a better photograph than any in his book. Really would have liked some good, sequenced shots ala Golf Digest, showing the lag, position at impact, etc. I think it would have added to the book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All I do is pitch, chip, and putt. The impact position of a pitch shot is the same as a full shot. So I focus on having the bottom of my swing occur as far to left of the ball as I can. Basically, instead of looking at the ball during the swing, as soon as I start my take away, I shift my eye's focus to a spot 3 to 4 inches ahead of the ball. Passive hands through impact. Twice a week I spend about an hour and a half. I usually take 3 balls to the practice green, wedge and putter. I pitch them up and putt them in from all sorts of places and distances. Keeping score. Getting up and down is Par, Pitching it close to within a club length is a birdie. I usually do this for 18 imaginary holes.

I practiced chipping around the green for several hours each day last week and my irons, driver got better, plus I cut 3 strokes off my short game. I also developed a 3/4 iron shot that use with one more club for a lower controlled approach shot into the greens with an easy swing, a Eureka moment for me, just by practicing the short game and concentrating on making solid contact with chipping.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is good to hear. I too stepped up my practice to doing it everyday in the backyard. 50 yard pitch shot with a PW or GW. My yard is all torn up. Oh well.

Keep doing it. I'm way more consistent with my irons than I was before. Practice is the only way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is good to hear. I too stepped up my practice to doing it everyday in the backyard. 50 yard pitch shot with a PW or GW. My yard is all torn up. Oh well.

Thanks for your reply. I started a thread under Grill called practice diary, that I invite you to document your practice sessions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • TST Affiliates

    SuperSpeed
    TourStriker PlaneMate
    FlightScope Mevo
    Use the code "iacas" for 10% off Mevo
  • Posts

    • ... I disagree wholeheartedly man.  I think that there are 100s of ways to think about any particular desired move but that only a few (sometimes 1) will actually engage the proper body parts to actually improve a golf swing rather than give a false appearance of improvement.    Ive been playing since I was a kid (20 years) and working on my swing like crazy for 10 years and went through 1000s of swing feels. I was always able to make my swing “look” better but never work better.  It wasn’t until I got the right feel that engaged the right muscles that everything changed and started to feel way easier.      Fair enough. I should say in my opinion. I’m probably going to end up disagreeing with 99% of people on here about the golf swing though haha.  You teach them how to make it work correctly... I feel that most instructors go through a “play book” of swing thoughts / feels to correct flaws until they find one that gives the appearance of improvement. 99% of the time those thoughts don’t actually engage the correct muscles and are only aesthetic. For example, You can have someone who rotates the shoulders way too flat on the backswing but is still on plane with the club. That’s a “fake out” in my opinion because that’s evidence that the hands and arms are forcing the plane rather that the body dictating it.  I work on getting them to feel the correct body motion to engage the correct muscles.   
    • Alright, so in your opinion, what are the best swing thoughts / feelings for each phase of the swing that you feel actually engage the correct muscles and encourage good sequencing. One for the backswing, downswing, and follow through.  I think that there are 100s of ways to think about a particular desired move but that only a few will engage the proper body parts to actually improve a golf swing rather than give a false appearance of improvement.    Ive been working on my swing for 10 years and went through 1000s of swing feels. I was always able to make my swing “look” better but never work better.  It wasn’t until I got the right feel that engaged the right muscles that everything changed and started to feel way easier.  For me it was all about my backswing and ensuring that my body coiled correctly and shoulders rotated steep enough. From there my downswing takes care of it self. I felt like my left shoulder works very low by thinking keep my left shoulder OFF of my chin. This made me turn way steeper and coil better. Swing speed jumped 8mph with driver and accuracy is WAY better.  So I’m curious what are some keys that you found that changed your game for the better?  .    
    • I work part time a local muni.  I am allowed free play and free cart at any time I can get on which is frequently.  I must admit I walk quite a bit and when I do use a cart I usually have a paying customer or two playing along.  When I complete my round with a cart, I usually wash it and get it ready to go again.  I feel they are giving me free golf and free cart, it is the least I can do. It's all good as far as I'm concerned. 
    • Walking is OK but rolling the ball on a green would be practising. See rule 5.2  
  • TST Blog Entries

  • Blog Entries

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. Chris4
      Chris4
      (39 years old)
    2. Daddycool_83
      Daddycool_83
      (37 years old)
    3. Gisle
      Gisle
      (58 years old)
    4. Griffith Simister
      Griffith Simister
      (38 years old)
    5. Jonesman9
      Jonesman9
      (47 years old)

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...