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"The Golfing Machine" by Homer Kelley

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I believe the book contains all of the answers to our questions. The only problem with it is trying to get it out in a useful manner. It is recommended to take a course from a Golfing Machine certified instructor.
http://www.thegolfingmachine.com/
I have attempted to read it several times but get lost in the cross-references. However I believe it is a book that warrants discussion.

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I read the first 10 pages and since then it has been rotting in the back seat of my car. It is not a swing method just a comprehensive catalog of all possible patterns that uses engineering and physics to dissect 24 components of the swing with up to 15 variations of each component. Although it brings discipline and objectivity to golf instruction, 95% of instructors remain blissfully unaware of it.

It is meant as a textbook for formal certification in TGM. IMO objective teaching credentials are essential in this game.

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I read the first 10 pages and since then it has been rotting in the back seat of my car. It is not a swing method just a comprehensive catalog of all possible patterns that uses engineering and physics to dissect 24 components of the swing with up to 15 variations of each component. Although it brings discipline and objectivity to golf instruction, 95% of instructors remain blissfully unaware of it.

And for that I think it's incredibly valuable. If you don't know how the body moves or how the pieces can be "stitched" together, it's that much tougher to help someone build a golf swing.

I'm reading it, working my way through it.

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I've seen references to this book on this forum lately. Anyone read it all and has some insight to share?

A book explaining how it all works sounds better than one where a single teachers thoughts are presented.

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A book explaining how it all works sounds better than one where a single teachers thoughts are presented.

Uh, the thing is, it explains how EVERY swing works. Every imaginable swing. You can view it almost as a system of taxonomy. It has its own bizarre (until you are comfortable with it) language and was written by a guy who, well, let's just say he was a bit odd. He spent 30 years working on the first edition of his book and rarely played golf. He shot 116 and then 74 in his first two rounds (or something like that)...

If you really like the golf swing I recommend you pick it up. But be forewarned... :)

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It would be interesting to read I think. Only problem is finding a place to buy it. All the norwegian stores only sell the The Curious Quest... Their official website wants $33 worth of shipping. On eBay and Amazon it costs $60-70.

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I keep checking it out from my library, not to learn from it, but to be actually able to read it. Let's just say it's not written in a linear fashion. As soon as I crack that nut, I'll start looking for the content. Right now, it reminds me of Tommy Smothers' golf book, "The Twenty-Six Most Important Things to Think About When You're About to Hit a Golf Ball."

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I keep checking it out from my library, not to learn from it, but to be actually able to read it. Let's just say it's not written in a linear fashion. As soon as I crack that nut, I'll start looking for the content. Right now, it reminds me of Tommy Smothers' golf book, "The Twenty-Six Most Important Things to Think About When You're About to Hit a Golf Ball."

Note that there's an order in which you're supposed to read the book. I'm sure you've seen it, but it's like chapters 1, 2, 12, 15, 3, 17, 14-1, 18, 2, 2, 2, 2, 6...

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I keep checking it out from my library, not to learn from it, but to be actually able to read it. Let's just say it's not written in a linear fashion. As soon as I crack that nut, I'll start looking for the content. Right now, it reminds me of Tommy Smothers' golf book, "The Twenty-Six Most Important Things to Think About When You're About to Hit a Golf Ball."

I've wanted to check this book out, but have not done so for that very reason. I can only imagine what swing thoughts an analytical golf book like this would impose on me.....

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After five years of research and experimentation I am concluding that it is nonsense to break down and study a sequence of movements that the body can perform automatically.

IMO experimentation is much more valuable. Moe Norman had it right, swinging a club cannot be taught or learned it must be earned.

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The body can't do anything automatically, it has to be learned. Why would you rather experiment with every possible movement instead of learning the proper ones right away? Makes no sense to me that everyone should be experimenting for themselves. How do you know when something is right and when it is not?

Since it's rather difficult to learn the entire swing in one sequence, we break it down, making it easier to comprehend.

Like in this video:
What he says is probably correct, but to "earn" all of that at the same time is not something I would recommend.

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After five years of research and experimentation I am concluding that it is nonsense to break down and study a sequence of movements that the body can perform automatically.

Without coming across argumentative I have to ask a question re: your post: Are you saying that the best way to become better at golf (or a more efficient ball striker) is to go it on your own...and practice and experiment for hours/days/months/years until you can hopefully 1) get it correct and 2) make it "automatic" to perform that correct motion?

Dave

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I earned it because it took a lot of trial mostly error until I stumbled onto the single swing key that automates the entire sequence. No more thought about lateral shift, flat left wrist, lag pressure, axis tilt, etc. Now when I go back and read Five Fundamentals I know why Hogan did not discuss lateral shift. It occurs automatically when you focus on only one key : stretch. Windup wide and deep, STRETCHING at the top into a firm rear side then fire the hips. This has nothing to do with power. The stretch initiates proper sequencing and prevents deceleration.

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Stretch? What are you stretching, how much, in which direction? You say you windup wide and deep, fire the hips etc. Sounds like more than one thing to me. Firing the hips we know you must do.

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I think you guys oughta realize it isn't a book that was made to be read like a novel.

Most of you are saying that you just can't make your way through it and the reason is because you will go into the book and the book will throw a ton of different information at you all within a couple of pages. Basically imagine if you had two books to read and at the end of each page of each book you had to understand every word in every line. Well a book by William Shakeseare would take you time to pour over the pages, tie strings together, and really figure everything out. It would take awhile. The book by Dr Seuss wouldn't take you 5 seconds. TGM book is definitely the former and not the latter and if you try to read it like a Seuss book and you don't take a moment to stop, pick up a club, look in the mirror, reread, and digest all that information you are wasting time.

It is a fantastic book and in my opinion there has never been a golf swing nor will there ever be a golf swing that can't be completely described in TGM terminology.

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I have ordered the book and look forward to reading it. It may go straight over the top of my head, but that's a risk I'm willing to take.

I like the prospect of a book that doesn't teach how to swing, but explain how the swing works, leaving it up to us to figure out how to learn it.

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