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I was thinking of trying a Hybrid #3 or #4. I've never hit one before, but I just can't get good contact/flight with my 09 Burner #3 wood.

And, since I'm not a long driver, I need something I can hit fairly well from the fairway.

Academy has the Burner #3 or #4 Hybrid on sale for $99. When I went to look at them, all the clubs they had marked as the sale clubs said "rescue #4".  So I'm now confused.  Of course the kid working there didn't even understand my question, so I'm asking what is the difference between a Hybrid and a Rescue club?

Thanks for any advice.

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Originally Posted by Texas solo

. . . I'm asking what is the difference between a Hybrid and a Rescue club?


A hybrid is what people use to replace long irons or fairway woods. A rescue club is used by high handicappers out of the rough to either peel the ball OB or flub it 20 yards into deeper rough. At least that's how I've seen them used most often.

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  • 2 years later...
  • 2 months later...
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I can't find this article you posted regarding Hybrid vs Rescue discussion:

http://www.cbssports.com/golf/story/10847704

Do you know if the link has changed? What is the title I can use to search for it?

A rescue and a hybrid are the same thing.  Rescue is just TaylorMade's name for a hybrid

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  • 3 months later...
They are different clubs. I was at a cobra sale, and they were offering 2h's and 2r's. H for hybrid, R for rescue. Rescue clubs are typically weighted with an insert near the sole. The additional weight helps the club stay on path through rough lies, hence a rescue shot. I own a baffled 18° 2r, and it flies through the rough. And it's an unwieldy club out of the fairway. It's made for rescue shots. The hybrid doesn't carry a weight insert. These clubs act as replacements for long irons, and set up better for fairway shots. This might not be universally true, but it's what cobra does and it makes sense to me. And, if you don't have a weighted rescue, go get one. I hit mine out of the rough nearly as far as my 3 wood off the fairway.
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They are different clubs.

I was at a cobra sale, and they were offering 2h's and 2r's. H for hybrid, R for rescue.

Rescue clubs are typically weighted with an insert near the sole. The additional weight helps the club stay on path through rough lies, hence a rescue shot. I own a baffled 18° 2r, and it flies through the rough. And it's an unwieldy club out of the fairway. It's made for rescue shots.

The hybrid doesn't carry a weight insert. These clubs act as replacements for long irons, and set up better for fairway shots.

This might not be universally true, but it's what cobra does and it makes sense to me.

And, if you don't have a weighted rescue, go get one. I hit mine out of the rough nearly as far as my 3 wood off the fairway.


Do you have a link to Cobra that shows the difference you're describing?

www.cobragolf.com shows only a hybrid category, with the Baffler, BioCELL, and AMP CELL club lines all listed as "hybrid."  I don't see that they use the term "rescue" for any of their clubs.  (You might know different--I'm just sayin' I can't find them when I try to look for them.)

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Back around 1970, some smaller club makers came out with trouble clubs, often called rescue or utility woods. These included the Stan Thompson Ginty, and the first-wave TM Raylor.

The original Ginty was a 7-wood head with a 4-wood length shaft; several other lofts emerged, including some early metal woods.

Ginty link: http://stanthompsongolf.excitewebpages.com/page/pse3/ABOUT_STAN.html

Then, TM made a club called the Rescue Mid in the early 2000s. Since then, rescue and hybrid have become interchangeable as generic terms.

All these clubs are distant relatives of the hickory-shaft era bulldog , a club with a small wooden head in a 25* to 27* loft. The head was only the width of 2 golfballs, and was useful for popping your ball out of the rough.

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They're both just short shafted 5woods! If you can hit a 5w and a 4i well then you shouldn't need one! They're designed for girls and people who swing like girls! I got this info from the PGA website!
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