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Chipless

Why is my right arm always so sore?

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I just started learning to golf five months ago.  I am 47 years old and in excellent health.  I lift weights and do martial arts several times every week.

I practice golf three times per week, and have hit more than 11,000 balls at the driving range.  At first, lots of things would get sore (palm of my left hand, blister on one of my right hand fingers, etc.), but after a while everything felt more normal - especially as my coach started to improve my swing.

But my right arm has continued to stay sore, and actually feels like it might be starting to get worse.  The pain area is from the point of the inner elbow bone to the muscles all around the uppermost part of the forearm.  It hurts most when I use my right hand to pick up something.  I assume this means I am gripping the club too hard, or bending my right arm on the downswing.

Would love to hear some thoughts about this...

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From your last post on goal setting (see below) - I think based on your sand wedge yardage, you're swinging too hard, which is likely beating up your right arm -->

If you normally hit a sand wedge 80-90 yards with limited flight range balls, I would put money on it you're swinging way too hard as a beginner, which leads to your inconsistent contact.    Sure, if I hit a perfect divot & really compress the ball, I can get a 56 degree wedge out that far, but it is not a controlled shot for the average high handicap player.       One drill that I learned on the Golf Channel was to start a practice session hitting balls at 25% of max power, then build up to 50% and thten 75% ... don't even worry where the ball is going - just focus on consistently hitting it in the sweet spot.    If you're not hitting it dead center, stay at that power level until you do, then move up.     That helped me.

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Reading the number of balls you have hit, I would say too many swinging too hard in a short period of time and if it is "golfer's elbow" only rest (or possibly a cortisone shot) will alleviate the pain. It is possible that with the inconsistent swing pattern you will have at this stage in the learning process may have resulted in hyper-extending the right arm prematurely before impact...slow down and rest it

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Originally Posted by Chipless

I just started learning to golf five months ago.  I am 47 years old and in excellent health.  I lift weights and do martial arts several times every week.

I practice golf three times per week, and have hit more than 11,000 balls at the driving range.  At first, lots of things would get sore (palm of my left hand, blister on one of my right hand fingers, etc.), but after a while everything felt more normal - especially as my coach started to improve my swing.

But my right arm has continued to stay sore, and actually feels like it might be starting to get worse.  The pain area is from the point of the inner elbow bone to the muscles all around the uppermost part of the forearm.  It hurts most when I use my right hand to pick up something.  I assume this means I am gripping the club too hard, or bending my right arm on the downswing.

Would love to hear some thoughts about this...


Perhaps you're in the middle of a mid-life crisis?

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Just reading the numbers of balls you hit and the frequency, it sounds like some form of RSI. Do hit off mats at the range? Impact vibrations probably worse off mats.

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Originally Posted by sean_miller

Perhaps you're in the middle of a mid-life crisis?


Obviously.



Originally Posted by misty_mountainhop

Just reading the numbers of balls you hit and the frequency, it sounds like some form of RSI. Do hit off mats at the range? Impact vibrations probably worse off mats.


I have been forced to hit off the mats for the last couple months, since the rest of the driving range is closed for the season.  What is RSI?

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Originally Posted by canadianpro

Reading the number of balls you have hit, I would say too many swinging too hard in a short period of time and if it is "golfer's elbow" only rest (or possibly a cortisone shot) will alleviate the pain. It is possible that with the inconsistent swing pattern you will have at this stage in the learning process may have resulted in hyper-extending the right arm prematurely before impact...slow down and rest it


I may go ahead and cut my practice sessions in half for a while, to see if I start heading in the right direction.

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Golfers elbow is inflammation of the tendon on the inner side of the arm starting at the funny bone area.  It is a repetitive motion injury and the hard mats at ranges do not help matters.  Rest and ice are a must as is stretching.  You can also wear a compression wrap around the forearm to help out if you must keep swinging.

I have found the best way to ice is using ice massage.  Take a Dixie cup and freeze water into it.  Then peel down the top part exposing ice.  Massage the sore area for 5 minutes.  It will get cold.  do this everyday, 2-3 times a day until pain subsides.  There are stretches and exercises you can find on-line as well.  Be patient too.  Your not getting any younger!! (I'm 51!).

Just resting won't eliminate the issue either.  You need to get the strength and flexibility back.  Get one of those squeeze balls to help increase strength and work the area.

If you hit off mats, reduce the amount you hit in a session and always wear the compression bandage until pain is gone.  Also, look at this thread on a better way to practice.

http://thesandtrap.com/t/54840/simple-specific-slow-short-and-success-the-five-s-s-of-great-practice

You'll be amazed at how less is more when it comes to practice.

Best of luck.

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It sounds like you have an over-use injury.  Another likely contributor is poor mechanics causing you to come in steep and hit the turf some.  This speeds along the injury process.  You may have strained your forearm muscles and tendons in the process.  Ease up on the number of balls, give yourself a week and a half of rest with ibuprofen and ice/heat, think about how you are trying to swing in the meantime.

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.

I am 49 and have dealt with the same issue.  It comes and goes, worst it seems after I workout with upper body exercises or hit balls on a hard mat.  This video with the Flexbar and Reverse Tyler Twist along with using a Band It help.  Also do a search for other rehab exercises for golfer's elbow on Youtube.  A good ice pack that wraps your elbow also helps.  Good luck!


Originally Posted by Chipless

I just started learning to golf five months ago.  I am 47 years old and in excellent health.  I lift weights and do martial arts several times every week.

I practice golf three times per week, and have hit more than 11,000 balls at the driving range.  At first, lots of things would get sore (palm of my left hand, blister on one of my right hand fingers, etc.), but after a while everything felt more normal - especially as my coach started to improve my swing.

But my right arm has continued to stay sore, and actually feels like it might be starting to get worse.  The pain area is from the point of the inner elbow bone to the muscles all around the uppermost part of the forearm.  It hurts most when I use my right hand to pick up something.  I assume this means I am gripping the club too hard, or bending my right arm on the downswing.

Would love to hear some thoughts about this...



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Sounds like golfers elbow. I have the same problem off and on. A compression wrap usually works best for me. You are hitting a TON of golfballs at the range and may want to cut back a bit. It's very easy to overdo it at the range hitting ball after ball without the benefit of that natural rest break you get on the course while you walk/ride to your next shot.

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I had this when I first started years ago. My doctor who was a low handicapper told me I was gripping the club to tightly. He told me to give it a break for a week, warm/hot and cold packs 4 or 5 times a day.

Remember it's like holding on to Robin eggs. You want to grip it tight enough to not let the club fly out of your hands.

I also bought some of those spring like grip exercise tool, and would squeeze them when I drove to work.

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