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longbow

It's the Ginty I tell ya!

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So on Sun when we got back from our camp I went down to the basement to seek out some 2 blade broad heads to put on some old arrows that I am going to use for hunting this year.  Shooting a Hill Ol Timer and old(but excellent cedar arrows).  Now what does this all have to do with golf.

Well saw my old pro bag(cart bag) in the corner and of course it is full of clubs.  Mostly wooden sticks.  So didn't find the bh's due to my wife re-arranging stuff so go over and looked in the bag and at all the dicarded clubs.  Some Clevelenad drivers and others.  But low and behold I reach in and pull out this Ginty.  It is in perfect condition.  Small persimmon head, reg shaft and the grip is excellent.  This thing has almost like a dropped face on it with a thick steel plate.  I don't think it has ever been hit actually.  So I says what the heck.  Take out my Cleveland 7 wood and replace it with the Ginty.  I like saying that, the Ginty!

Played Mon. and without a doubt this club from thick ruff is the ticket.  Slight draw and about 180 yds but extremely easy to hit.  Matter of fact I hit this club every chance I got and didn't duff one shot.  It is very club head heavy but put a good smooth stroke on it and this thing just soars.  The 7th hole on the west course in Churchville where I play is like 390 from the blues.  Hit a not so good drive about 200 yds. sliced right into the deep ruff.  Used the Ginty and put it right up on the front of the green.  Just a nice high slight draw.  Effortless almost.   I duffed a drive on the 3rd hole and from a good 270 out from the deep ruff, put a good swing on it and had a perfect wedge to the green.  Dead center of the fairway.

Now it has must have set in this bag well since I quit playing like in 99 or so.   I might have bought this maybe in 96 or so but just never used it.  Anyways what a perfect little club.  I think it might be a Simmons or something like that.  So there ya go.  Longbows and old wooden clubs just kind of go together.  thanks

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I saw tons of those as a kid when I was caddy in the early 80s

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That is the club I have!  Stan Thompson.  Holy moly what a sweet club and great info.  thanks

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Similar to the Ginty... Circa 2006, TM came out with the second-generation Raylors - 19* and 22*. These metal wood/trouble clubs have a boat hull-shaped head design highly similar to the persimmon Gintys. (Original Raylors from the late 1980s had small heads and rails on the sole).

I carried a 19* Raylor for two + seasons instead of a 5W. Some Golfsmith shops have a few Raylors "in the rack" for under $100 if anyone is interested.

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I had one but it must have been made way before the  80s It was an old club when I first picked it in th 70s. . I loved played with it untill one day the head split. I have never found a club I could hit so pure since.

As soon as I save some money I will be ordering on may the 2  I think the old one was about a 5.  I like the look of the sand wedge too.

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here is a link to The Original  cost quite a bit more than the other link. Like to see them side by side. http://www.sweetwoodgolf.com/stthgsacl.html

Own the ORIGINAL Savior Club! In 1973 well known clubmaker Stan Thompson invented and patented the original ginty "trouble" club. As the story goes, he saw Ben Hogan hit a 2 iron out of the deep rough at the U.S. Open onto the green. Stan thought to himself, "The average golfer will never be able to make that shot". Many years later he saw a speed boat passing him and realized the potential of the keel and developed the keel bottom "Ginty" a seven wood head on a four wood shaft). The keel sole plate was made from zinc giving the club a very low center of gravity and the four wood shaft added to club head speed. Three additional patent changes were made in the club to improve and strengthen the head. By the time of Stan's death in 1995, over 2 millions Gintys had been sol

Also a nice story on Stan Thompson with more links if you want to read on. http://www.wordshack.com/reading_areas/essay/e_StanThompson.shtml

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Wow as I read more I find that I think I was right before I edited my post I think my club was a solid head made much early see photo.

this is what mine looked like but I think It had screws in the face like this but know holes

This is where the term hitting it on the screws came from by the way.

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I am tellin anyone that will listen that this is with out question the easiest club to hit well I've ever played bar none.  Played yesterday and the wind was blowing about 25-30 mph by the lake.  Playing the back 9 at Ozzie's Corner golf in Hamlin NY.  Went there cause usually during the day there are 0 folks there in the early afternoon and the greens although for the most part are small they are SUPERB.  Like walking on a firm sponge and super clean too.

So with the wind blowing from the west and a bit south west at times the majority of holes are into or quartering into the wind on the back 9.  So driving on some holes would just exacerbate my "power fade" into a nice short slice.  So enter this Ginty.  You know how when the rough gets dried out it will leave little tiny moon spots surrounded by tuffts of high grass.  Well that is what I found myself more often than not.  The ball would be sitting down on brown grass almost in a tiny hard pan crater with lush some what high grass around the ball.  Bottom line is that my drive went about 200 yds(12th hole) into a very stiff wind and was pushed right, more so than just being a sliced shot.  I am about 190 out and to reach this pin which was on top of the green but in the back, you have to carry a pretty deep valley that now has a dried up creek in front of it.  This valley may be about 50' deep and maybe 50 yds wide and then the green starts severely up hill again about a 45' from bottom to top.  Like I said the greens are lush, a wee bit slow but like walking on the finest carpet you can imagine.  Strike the Ginty with a punch stroke and finish about 3/4 up into the swing.  The ball comes out like it is on a rope.  Wind is blowing pretty good but didn't seem to have alot of effect on the flight of the ball like it did when I hit driver.  Hit half up the green and maybe a 5' roll maybe less.  Greens are so nice there isn't even a mark on the green when I walk up to the ball and mark it.  I am looking around to see if anyone saw the shot I though it was so good.

Now normally I would have hit maybe a 9 to lay up to the top of the hill and then pitch across about another 90 yds to the pin.  This happened all day with this club.  Lies that sucked I would pull the Ginty out and maybe choke down or not depending on the distance and just hit it.  Played very slightly forward I could hit it down a bit more a more boring shot and playing it in the center I could get more height and bit more distance.  It is a GREAT club bar none and have not duffed a shot yet.  So there ya go.  thanks

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Originally Posted by WUTiger

Similar to the Ginty... Circa 2006, TM came out with the second-generation Raylors - 19* and 22*. These metal wood/trouble clubs have a boat hull-shaped head design highly similar to the persimmon Gintys. (Original Raylors from the late 1980s had small heads and rails on the sole).

I carried a 19* Raylor for two + seasons instead of a 5W. Some Golfsmith shops have a few Raylors "in the rack" for under $100 if anyone is interested.

Same goes for the early Cobra Bafflers - small persimmon head with tricked-out metal soleplate. Great out of the tall grass. However, just about any small-headed persimmon 5-wood or 7-wood works pretty well, too.

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Originally Posted by WUTiger

Similar to the Ginty... Circa 2006, TM came out with the second-generation Raylors - 19* and 22*. These metal wood/trouble clubs have a boat hull-shaped head design highly similar to the persimmon Gintys. (Original Raylors from the late 1980s had small heads and rails on the sole).

I carried a 19* Raylor for two + seasons instead of a 5W. Some Golfsmith shops have a few Raylors "in the rack" for under $100 if anyone is interested.

I had one like that from the late 80's ... it was called a "Cleek."  Tiniest head, and rails ... loved that thing!  (It had a bent hosel such that it played like a club with a draw bais accidentally ... worked out for me though!)

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Anyone know anything about this club? It's not a Ginty but is it possibly a 50th anniversary model with the designation 'ST-50' ? In any case - loving them.

Fleet

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If anyone is interested, a similar persimmon club is still available from Louisville Golf, in steel or graphite shaft from 2 wood through 15. it is called the "Niblick". I also cherish a first generation Taylor Raylor in 16*, not quite as forgiving but the small head makes it useful.
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