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doublebogey777

Private club for beginner golfer????

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I have been playing golf about six months. I joined a "Golfer Advancement Program" at a local (within 5 miles of home) public course where I get unlimited range balls; as well as use of chipping and putting green use for $40 per month. I also get "discounted" golf during non peak hours; 18 holes with cart for $18-20 instead of $39 on a descent public course. I have a private club with 3, VERY NICE 9 hole courses within 1 mile of home. It also includes another "facility", same club within 5 miles of home with 3 more VERY NICE courses. Members can play both facilities for a low "home rate" fee. Membership is relatively cheap at $145 per month. My question is not about the economics and value as much as if a beginner golfer be accepted in such a place. My other concern would be if the courses may be too difficult and discouraging. I'm not terribly concerned about the latter as I am very competitive and like a challenge. I have spent an extensive amount of time on the driving range so I don't do nearly as many embarrassing things as I did previously. Thank you in advance for any insight you may have.
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ummm, where is this place?  I might move there for 27 private holes at $145/month.  You sure it's private and not semi-private?

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Its private. Located in the Houston area. The club is Canongate Texas. I would be considered South Houston and home clubs would be Mongolia Creek and South Shore Harbor. Actually its 5 clubs for one membership, but the other three are on the other side of Houston. The $$ seems well worth it, especially since we play year round. :-)
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Assuming the $145/mo. is all there is to it, i.e. no initiation fee or long term commitment, and that expense is acceptable to you, I say give it a try. See how you are received, and try all of the courses you can in that month to see if you like them. Not much to lose.
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I joined a private club a year into playing - never had a problem with anyone. It is kind of nice to see members that I was paired with in tourneys 4 years ago to mention what an improvement they see from me.

Of course I never let myself be an outcast, My handicap did go up 5 strokes when I joined the private club, but the monthly tourneys allowed me to meet a good portion of the membership right off the bat.

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Its a one year commitment with $200 initiation fee. I may take cooke119's advice and stay public for a while. I already know some members so I may try it as a guest.
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Dude, just join the club.

You don't have to be good -- just be honest about your skill level, don't waste time on the course (don't keep looking and looking for that ball in the woods/rough and be willing to pick up if you're having a 'mare on a hole), and no one should care.  If you play at an appropriate pace, anyone who's bothered by you because you're a beginner is just an a-hole.

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Originally Posted by Roblar

If you play at an appropriate pace, anyone who's bothered by you because you're a beginner is just an a-hole.

This. I am only a year into playing, my handicap varies from a 15.1 late summer to a 19.1 currently and it goes up and down as I brain dump simple things, fall apart, and then remember them and bring my game back down.

Some days I look like I've been playing for years, others I look like I am a caveman who just picked up a club. The only thing any member of my club has ever said to me was "hey man, it happens to all of us from time to time just keep at it".

In general, everyone I've met on the golf course has been extremely courteous and helpful. If you want to join, just join.

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