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Available to Pro's only Titleist ProV's

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Anyone else aware of this... Titleist produces a ProV1 that is made available to touring Pro's only.  There is a black dot on the box indicating their difference.  A buddy of mine was given a sleeve and told me the story.  There was no story about what Titleist has done differently with this ball, but there must be something different on the inside, right?  My friend hasn't played the ball yet, so no feedback from him.  Just wondering if anyone out there can comment.

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I have a buddy who's a pro. He gets his balls from Titelist with his initials on them. He said the pro balls are simply the best ones off the production line, no defects whatsoever. Not sure how they're chosen or what the criteria is but there isn't anything different in terms of composition, as far as he is aware.

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They're no different.

Except for the fact that some guys are still playing the 2009 model, or the 2011 model, or whatever years they are (i.e. they can get old models of balls if they like).

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I have a buddy who's a pro. He gets his balls from Titelist with his initials on them. He said the pro balls are simply the best ones off the production line, no defects whatsoever.

That's not true. What defects do normal ones have? None. Someone has been fibbing to your buddy.

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That's not true.

What defects do normal ones have? None. Someone has been fibbing to your buddy.

Exactly.

It's been posted before, but here's an excerpt from the Titleist website.....

As you know, we invest significant time and effort to ensure that our products are Best-in-Class in terms of quality, performance and consistency. As such, in the rare event one of our products fails to meet USGA requirements for size, weight, velocity or any other conformance criteria we destroy rather than market such products.

As such, only products that are of a minimal defect are available for purchase. These products are available in two offerings:

1. Pro V1 Practice golf balls are conforming products that differ only due to a cosmetic blemish such as paint, ink or registration of stamping. Pro V1 Practice golf balls do not have any construction or performance deficiencies.

2. Pro V1 X-Out golf balls are also conforming products. However, they usually have a cosmetic blemish and/or occasionally have a minor physical defect that should not significantly affect its performance. More often than not, the physical condition causing the ball to be stamped as an X-Out is so minute that it is not recognizable by the player.

Both products may be used in the casual round of golf including those with scores posted for handicaps, and most competitions, with the possible exception of high level competitions invoking the Local Rule requiring balls to be on the List of Conforming Golf Balls. Please refer to the USGA Official Rules on the subject listed below for your reference:

Q: May I use a ball stamped with "Practice" or "X-Out" to play a round of golf?

A: Our present policy provides that if the List of Conforming Golf Balls or the One Ball Condition is in effect, a practice or logo ball may be used provided the other markings on the ball (i.e., pole and seam) correspond exactly to a ball listing on the current List of Conforming Golf Balls. Balls labeled with ''PRACTICE'' or a circled ''P'', are essentially treated as a logo ball (such as a Mickey Mouse emblem). A player's name stamped on the ball is also acceptable. However, the original ball markings (i.e., pole and seam markings) must be readable in order for a Rules Official to determine whether that ball is on the List of Conforming Golf Balls. X-Out balls are not permitted to be used in any competition in which the List of Conforming Golf Balls or the One Ball Condition is in effect. However, if neither of these Conditions are in effect, X-Out balls may be used because all balls are presumed to conform unless they have been tested and found not to conform or are obviously non-conforming (e.g., too small or too heavy). (See Decisions 5-1/4 and US/5-1/101).

As a result of the potential for an X-Out to be non-conforming if tested, we do not recommend using this model during tournament play.

They're no different.

Except for the fact that some guys are still playing the 2009 model, or the 2011 model, or whatever years they are (i.e. they can get old models of balls if they like).

I hadn't thought that some Pros may prefer to stick with an older model.....

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That's not true. What defects do normal ones have? None. Someone has been fibbing to your buddy.

No one was fibbing. What I suspect is that 100% of the pro balls go through their QC process where the commercial balls probably are QC'd at some statistically valid sampling pctg (1-5% would be my guess). He did mention they were hand-picked so that theory probably is close. In any production line, there is a chance that machines get a bit out of whack so they QC some pctg to ensure they're in check. I don't doubt their marketing, when a defect is discovered, depending on some threshold they've established, they probably outsort the bad ones. So, the majority of commercial are probably just as perfect as the pros. Wouldn't surprise me though, if the pro threshold parameters are just a bit tighter than commercial.

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Maybe the Pro balls have picked out because the "Titleist" logo is perfectly aligned with the dimpling to make it look "perfect". Makes it easier to make symmetrical marks (if desired) on the ball or something? A bit of a stretch, but if you've ever read a celebrity rider, it wouldn't surprise me.

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Maybe the Pro balls have picked out because the "Titleist" logo is perfectly aligned with the dimpling to make it look "perfect". Makes it easier to make symmetrical marks (if desired) on the ball or something? A bit of a stretch, but if you've ever read a celebrity rider, it wouldn't surprise me.

This may be one of the metrics they use in QC, who knows? I suspect they are more focused on size, weight, roundness, etc. Those things that could affect performance. I'd guess there are 20 or more different criteria they measure in QC, aesthetics probably lower priority. Variation can occur in so many ways and I'm sure they have a stellar quality department that ensures it's detected at a very high percentage.

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The next time I see my buddy with the sleeve, I'll see if he still has the them in his bag.  If so, I'll take a picture and post it.  The sleeve has a black dot under the Pro V1 labeling.  Again, according to the pro that gave him this sleeve of balls, these are not the same as what we buy from retail outlets.  They are provided to pros only.  If they are the same, why mark the box differently?

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The next time I see my buddy with the sleeve, I'll see if he still has the them in his bag.  If so, I'll take a picture and post it.  The sleeve has a black dot under the Pro V1 labeling.  Again, according to the pro that gave him this sleeve of balls, these are not the same as what we buy from retail outlets.  They are provided to pros only.  If they are the same, why mark the box differently?

My buddy has given me a couple dozen of his pro balls. I don't recall there being any special marking on the box but each ball has his initials stamped. Perhaps those are low threshold tolerance, 100% QC'd balls that aren't earmarked for a specific pro?

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My buddy has given me a couple dozen of his pro balls. I don't recall there being any special marking on the box but each ball has his initials stamped.

Perhaps those are low threshold tolerance, 100% QC'd balls that aren't earmarked for a specific pro?

Not sure it would be appropriate to mention this pros name, but he did win the PGA Championship.  I think he is on the level.  Or maybe he's just FOS!  : )

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Ha, I doubt it. The pro to which I refer only played a couple events on tour so ur guy is more high profile. He's a teaching pro but still somehow gets free balls from Titelist, not sure if all Class A pro's do.

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No one was fibbing. What I suspect is that 100% of the pro balls go through their QC process where the commercial balls probably are QC'd at some statistically valid sampling pctg (1-5% would be my guess). He did mention they were hand-picked so that theory probably is close.

In any production line, there is a chance that machines get a bit out of whack so they QC some pctg to ensure they're in check. I don't doubt their marketing, when a defect is discovered, depending on some threshold they've established, they probably outsort the bad ones. So, the majority of commercial are probably just as perfect as the pros. Wouldn't surprise me though, if the pro threshold parameters are just a bit tighter than commercial.

The idea of balls being specially picked out is ridiculous.

If you have seen the documentary about the CEO of TaylorMade where they show the ball factory or the doco about the ProV1 factory, you'll see that this just could not happen.

Balls are being spat out in the thousands. They inspect them randomly by eye - and then take out a random box and check them.

The ones the top players get are inspected individually, but they are not selected as the best of the best.

In other words, if 10000 dozen boxes get sent to the shops there might be a ball or two with a small blemish that we would notice but not worry about.

The ones the top players get will each have been inspected. Not especially picked out, if you know what I mean.

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The idea of balls being specially picked out is ridiculous. If you have seen the documentary about the CEO of TaylorMade where they show the ball factory or the doco about the ProV1 factory, you'll see that this just could not happen. Balls are being spat out in the thousands. They inspect them randomly by eye - and then take out a random box and check them. The ones the top players get are inspected individually, but they are not selected as the best of the best. In other words, if 10000 dozen boxes get sent to the shops there might be a ball or two with a small blemish that we would notice but not worry about. The ones the top players get will each have been inspected. Not especially picked out, if you know what I mean.

I'm sure you couldn't be more wrong. A top company such as Titelist has a very rigorous quality program in place and their QC involves a helluva a lot more than a random "by eye" review. Would love to hear from someone to corroborate but to some degree it's probably proprietary so that person couldn't divulge everything such as sampling size, metrics measured, etc. As someone familiar with quality, I'd be interested to hear how they do it.

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I'm sure you couldn't be more wrong. A top company such as Titelist has a very rigorous quality program in place and their QC involves a helluva a lot more than a random "by eye" review. Would love to hear from someone to corroborate but to some degree it's probably proprietary so that person couldn't divulge everything such as sampling size, metrics measured, etc.

As someone familiar with quality, I'd be interested to hear how they do it.

I thought I mentioned a documentary that a lot of people here have seen.

This girl does ALL OF IT on her own. 5000 balls per day.

Go and look up the TaylorMade one on Youtube. You'll find that I couldn't be more right.

Obviously each ball has to possess certain qualities and be within parameters.

I'm talking about what happens beyond that.

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I hadn't thought that some Pros may prefer to stick with an older model.....

Tiger still plays the One Tour D, after all. Same with other players/companies.

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