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Scratch Wedges

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I have been reading about Scratch wedges lately and have become more and more curious. A friend of mine had purchased one earlier this year and has nothing but incredible things to say about it. Anyone have experience with these? And if so, what is your feedback?

post #2 of 18

Your friend would be overstating things a little.

Most wedges are very similar in performance.

Find one that has a shape you like.

That's it.

If there were one brand that was "incredible", everyone would be using it.

post #3 of 18

Depends on which one you get - my experience with the 1018 is the grooves wear quickly. I've heard the 8620 (cast but milled) last longer but demoed it, and the head is small. They are fine wedges - if the grind fits and you like the shape of the head, the 8620 is a good wedge.

post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shorty View Post

Your friend would be overstating things a little.

Most wedges are very similar in performance.

Find one that has a shape you like.

That's it.

 

Most are similar, yes.

 

But then again most don't have nearly enough bounce.

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shorty View Post

Your friend would be overstating things a little.

Most wedges are very similar in performance.

Find one that has a shape you like.

That's it.

If there were one brand that was "incredible", everyone would be using it.

Well, I never said that he claimed it was the greatest club on the market, he simply loves the club. He liked the feel and grind.

 

But what you are saying is that the biggest difference between a $130 Vokey and a $30 Wilson wedge is the shape?

 

I think there is a bit more to finding the right wedge than shape.

post #6 of 18
I'm playing a Scatch 1018 now alongside 2 Vokeys. It replaced one other Vokey and I like it a lot so far. Very clean lines and beautifully finished. Nice compact head that I really like. About a swing wt heavier than my Vokeys and I haven't quite decided if I like that or not yet.

Good feel, plenty of spin without being silly. A little pricier than the Vokeys or Clevelands. Time will tell if it'll be worth the $'s....
post #7 of 18

I'm playing with two 1018 Scratch wedges, a 53º and a 58º both in "DD" which are the ones with the most bounce.

Erik is right, they don't have enough :-)

 

The grooves do wear awfully quick, and after 18 months they don't spin half as much as they used to. Compare that to a Vokey which will shred most balls even after the same amount of time.

 

The reason why I bought those wedges was that the top line looks great to me and the darkish finish helps in the sun.

They were awfully pricey though and now that Edel is making wedges, I wouldn't buy Scratch again unless the price of the 1018 went way down.

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by kurisu View Post

I'm playing with two 1018 Scratch wedges, a 53º and a 58º both in "DD" which are the ones with the most bounce.

Erik is right, they don't have enough :-)

 

The grooves do wear awfully quick, and after 18 months they don't spin half as much as they used to. Compare that to a Vokey which will shred most balls even after the same amount of time.

 

The reason why I bought those wedges was that the top line looks great to me and the darkish finish helps in the sun.

They were awfully pricey though and now that Edel is making wedges, I wouldn't buy Scratch again unless the price of the 1018 went way down.

Had the same experience with the 1018 but it was more like the grooves being battered after 6 months when I once practiced a lot. Interestingly, I bought one of their first milled 1018 wedges (which they only milled for a limited time) and found it lasted considerably longer.

 

And at over $300 for a custom grind Scratch wedge whose grooves won't last a couple of years, well 'nuff said. But it is a nice wedge for the time it lasts.

post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 

They do have a 8620 milled wedge as well. If I'm not mistaken, this is the same steel used for most wedges including Vokeys. I wonder if these would last longer.

post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9424tm View Post

They do have a 8620 milled wedge as well. If I'm not mistaken, this is the same steel used for most wedges including Vokeys. I wonder if these would last longer.

My posts mentioned the Cast 8620 - I've heard it lasts longer. The head is very compact so make certain you like that part of it before you buy.

post #11 of 18

I have purchased the 50,56,60 degree DD wedges.   the swing weight is a D8.  Yes they are heavy...   The look is clean and the leading edge is sharp.  I play on tight turfs and are hard pack.  I find sometimes that I skip into the ball because of the bounce.  It is hard to have a bounce for one set of conditions and one for another.   I also added the KBS c taper shafts.   The look and feel great.  I have notice that the grooves do get dirty quickly and that the spin is less after about twenty rounds.  I love the look and they play well.   I am happy with my purchase.   Like everyone else we are all searching for the Holly Grail...  I have not found it but I have and will enjoy the journey...

post #12 of 18

You can't really compare the groove durability between the 1018 Scratch and a Vokey...The 1018 is forged of a softer metal than the Cast Vokey...of course the grooves are going to wear quicker. The 8620 is cast like the Vokeys/Clevelands and made of a stronger metal, and as such the grooves last much longer than the 1018s.

 

That being said, the Scratch wedges are quality wedges. The 1018s are a little bigger than the 8620s, but both are fairly compact and on the heavy side. Good shape, good feel, several grind/bounce options available to retail (with more available for custom orders). When bought through Scratch, they offer free stamping too. I've had the 8620s in the bag in the past and loved them, actually just put an order in for a new set of them.

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

Most are similar, yes.

 

But then again most don't have nearly enough bounce.

Just curioius ... If one were unable to afford the Edels, where would you suggest they go look if they wanted the most bounce possible?  Or are all of the off the shelf wedges too similar?

post #14 of 18

I've got a set of 8620's and an older JLM series 56* that is equivalent to a 1018. Their forged wedges are a bit heavier than the 8620's, but both are on the hefty side.  I've been gaming both typed for a while now, and almost all of the above posters are correct in saying that their forged wedges have grooves that get a bit dull after a season or so. The grooves on the 8620's are awesome, bite the ball as well as any Vokey or Jaws wedges I've ever hit. Overall I've been very happy with these wedges, and I plan to keep the 8620's for a while, while the JLM wedge is still performing now, I imagine after another season or so will probably validate a replacement.

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

Just curioius ... If one were unable to afford the Edels, where would you suggest they go look if they wanted the most bounce possible?  Or are all of the off the shelf wedges too similar?

 

You get fit for the bounce that fits you. You don't just say "I want this much bounce."

post #16 of 18

I have two 56's, 2 60's, and a 50 Scratch wedge in the 8620.  The thing I like best about them is the bounce and the fact that I requested lighter heads to get a lower swing weight since I play them 1/2" over standard.  The second 56 and 60 I bought, I did not buy from Scratch and I removed some weight from the hosel to get my swing weight down.  They came with KBS Tour shafts which i have since switched to C Tapers.

 

I love my wedges.  Them still spin great, look great to me, and my short game is better.  I found that the other wedges I had in the past were heavy at plus 1/2", especially Vokeys and Clevelands but I did have X100s in them.

 

I just bought the 50 about a month ago and then the 56 and 60 this past week as my wedges were a little wore, but they are over two years old too.  I could keep playing them easily but I also wanted the Raw Tour finish this time.  I bought the 50 from Rockbottom for like $55 too by the way.  Check them out if you want to save some cash.

post #17 of 18
Being "fit" for your wedges is one of the best things you can do to lower your score. I play all 3 with a 2* flat lie. The results were immediate. I have a set of the Scratch 8620 D.S. in 47*, 53* (bent to 54*) and 58*. I had previously gamed the Callaway X Forged with Mack Daddy grooves. I've also a set of Vokey Spin Milled (1st generation) and Sonartec t35 proto's. (I soo loved these!!). I also have a set of Cleveland 900's that I really liked. But I got fit for those and it's saved me, easily, 3 strokes a round. The Scratch 8620 is a fantastic wedge and are currently in my bag. ALL of the wedges mentioned above are forged from the same grade and Rockwell hardness as each other (+/- a hair) so the "feel" will be pretty similar. The Vokey "could" be a cast wedge. I can't recall for certain.The earlier Scratch wedges were forged from a softer carbon steel like most Mizuno, Fourteen, Chickara(?),( all tour wedges), your "boutique" wedges. Being forged from a softer carbon steel will cause them to wear quickly if you work with your wedges. Why not? Consider how many times you use your wedges each round. Think about it? Me? My tendency is to miss greens a little left, when I'm completely missing 'em. True, what everyone has said regarding the 8620 being heavier. Someone posted "about 1 swing wight difference" and I can agree with that. I find it to be a positive, however. For me, anyway. What it does, for me, is really help with tempo. I think they are one of the best ever when there is ankle deep rough outside the first cut. Seems like the club will just drop down behind the ball.....automatically. I just have to remember, and stay conscious , of keeping my hands in FRONT of the head. You still have to swing it but it's a comfortable weight. Being discontinued, I got a great deal. When I bought mine, they were $59.99 on www.rockbottomgolf.com so I bought two of each wedge. Regarding head size, I don't think they are much smaller than any other professional wedge. I may just be used to them. But I have had this set in my bag for about 9 months. I play, on average, twice a week and stop by the range that's on my way home from work every day for about an hour or so. I live in SC and it gets cold but we do get 4 good solid seasons of play. The Scratch wedge,again? I recommend it highly. With all my play and practice I can't tell a difference in "dulling". The ball still hits the green, bounces twice, and stops. No more or less than when they were new. It's a solid, quality, accurate, precise piece of equipment. I can't see anyone going wrong with a Scratch wedge. Male or Female.
post #18 of 18

If you want to try a good wedge, get your hands on a "Fourteen" wedge. The best wedge on the market IMHO. I have a 58* and love it for work around the green.

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