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The dreaded yips

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I stopped playing golf because I could not putt because of the yips.  That was about 8 years ago and recently I have thought about trying again and have been practising in the hallway at home.

Yips continue to haunt me even after that period of time.

I have found it is the right hand that is the problem so I tried putting left handed only and that works fine but I have trouble keeping the club steady on the back swing. I found just touching the club with only the point of two fingers of my right hand enables me to now putt yip free.

Not yet tried it on the course.

My handicap prior to early retirement was 10.

If anyone has a better cure for the yips I would welcome your input.

Ken

post #2 of 7

Try holding the club in the palm of the right hand with the grip running along  the lifeline with the fingertips holding the club...then just marry it up to the left hand using a  ten finger grip....it will easiest if you get the right hand on while the club is at your side.

 

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post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kennyk View Post
 

I stopped playing golf because I could not putt because of the yips.  That was about 8 years ago and recently I have thought about trying again and have been practising in the hallway at home.

Yips continue to haunt me even after that period of time.

I have found it is the right hand that is the problem so I tried putting left handed only and that works fine but I have trouble keeping the club steady on the back swing. I found just touching the club with only the point of two fingers of my right hand enables me to now putt yip free.

Not yet tried it on the course.

My handicap prior to early retirement was 10.

If anyone has a better cure for the yips I would welcome your input.

Ken

 

I would look into getting fitted for a putter. A lot of people have trouble with too light of a putter. Maybe some counter balancing and a heavier club head could help steady out the swing. If you do have the yips, which is a decrease in motor functions, a heavier club could help add in some momentum from the club during the swing, instead of on relying on your hands to make the stroke. 

 

Its more expensive, but take a look at Odyssey heavy putters, or Edel putters. Edel putters is an investment though, but the process they use to get fitted is top notch. 

 

I didn't have the yips, but I added a layer of lead tape under my grip and it help my golf stroke greatly. I use to jerk the club way to inside sometimes. The weight really helps me feel the club more in my hands. 

post #4 of 7

You also might try the left hand low technique .

post #5 of 7

Aside from getting fitted, which is probably the best thing to do. I found that by installing a larger grip, allowed me to have much more control of my putter. The skinnier grips made it so my hands wrapped around them to much, and I had much less control, so, you may want to have a look at bigger grips, like the Super Stroke, or Lampkin grips, to see if they help.   

post #6 of 7

Have you tried using an anchored putter? It's not against the rules yet.

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer 4 View Post
 

Aside from getting fitted, which is probably the best thing to do. I found that by installing a larger grip, allowed me to have much more control of my putter. The skinnier grips made it so my hands wrapped around them to much, and I had much less control, so, you may want to have a look at bigger grips, like the Super Stroke, or Lampkin grips, to see if they help.   

+1 on this and getting fitted.  I use a midsize piston grip on my putter.  It allows me better control of the club.

 

I've never had the yips, but you also might try a shorter pre-putt routine.  I don't do a practice stroke standing next to the ball.  I found in practice that the practice stroke did nothing to help my distance control at address and made it difficult to stay focused on my putting line. If I do one, it will be standing behind my ball looking down the line of the putt.  More to just stay loose than anything else.

 

My routine is quick and also eliminates over thinking.  I look down my putt line and pick my target based on the amount of break. Then I address the ball aiming my putter at that target.  I look down at the ball and take my stroke.  

 

I recommend Dave Stockton's book, Unconscious Putting.  He goes into detail about shot routines and how to stay focused.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Unconscious-Putting-Stocktons-Unlocking-Signature/dp/1592406602/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1392560466&sr=1-1&keywords=dave+stockton

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