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Can We Stop Talking About Millennials Entering the Work World?


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2 hours ago, The Flush said:

I'm just curious.  I am a ChemE by degree although I haven't worked as an engineer in a long time. I am in environmental and safety compliance now. I am just wondering how fluid power engineers compare to ChemE. I know I earn less than I could as a true engineer, but reasons got in the way. I know that my current employer wants to pay entry level pay for an experienced engineer and then wonders why they can't attract anyone.  Generally when you can't fill jobs it it because you don't pay enough.

Chem E would transition in to this easily. Mass, Heat transfer, Fluids and Thermo all apply.

1 hour ago, ChetlovesMer said:

Hmmm... I've never been a ChemE. I got my degree in Electrical Engineering (can't spell geek without double E!). Anyway, fluid power engineers spend most of their time working on 3 major things. First, they attempt to turn power from a prime mover (Electric motor or diesel engine usually) into hydraulic power (traction drive or work function usually) in the most efficient way possible based on the application. So, they spend a lot of time trying to understand duty cycles and torque curves and muscle charts. Then they blend all of that together to try to produce the most work for the least amount of fuel. Second, they try to either remove noise or remove heat from any hydraulic system. Which is kind of the same thing as the first thing they do, because noise and heat are just losses. So, by trying to remove those you are in theory actually making the system more efficient. The third thing they seem to work on a lot is how to reduce the cost of any of the previous 2 things. ... which in a way is also kind of the same thing. 

You work a lot with prime movers, pumps, motors, valves, cylinders, and the control systems and human interfaces that make them all go. 

PS - As I read through what I just wrote it certainly sounds pretty simple. 

See above.

1 hour ago, ChetlovesMer said:

Clearly, not an engineering school.

Fortunately, the university I attended also offered a college of nursing and a college of teaching.

My school was 6:1 men to women. Chem Es were closer to 4:1. In my senior year Unit OPs lab, I had three women lab partners. I married of them and another was our Maid of Honor.😉 

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46 minutes ago, boogielicious said:

My school was 6:1 men to women. Chem Es were closer to 4:1.

So no Female Anatomy 101 classes... with lab.  Good to know you married within your major...  😁

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13 minutes ago, Double Mocha Man said:

So no Female Anatomy 101 classes... with lab.  Good to know you married within your major...  😁

But she’s a lawyer now!

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I worked in the auto industry before I retired.   Most engineers that were hired usually didn't work in their chosen field.   The closest I saw was EE working with ladder logic on robotics.   Most hires were ME which became a general job of trouble shooting.    The engineering corps liked the wages and the easy job but usually there wasn't much in the way of advancement.   

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55 minutes ago, dennyjones said:

Most engineers that were hired usually didn't work in their chosen field. 

One of the first things I was taught at Ohio State was Engineers were problem solvers. It is very common for Engineers to not work directly in the field of their degree or specialization is in. I find this to be OK in that the skills learned as an Engineer cross platform really well. Most of it is knowing how to gain knowledge, apply it to the problem, and come up with a solution. 

I feel engineering is one of the better degrees to get just in how they train you to think. 

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49 minutes ago, saevel25 said:

One of the first things I was taught at Ohio State was Engineers were problem solvers. It is very common for Engineers to not work directly in the field of their degree or specialization is in. I find this to be OK in that the skills learned as an Engineer cross platform really well. Most of it is knowing how to gain knowledge, apply it to the problem, and come up with a solution. 

I feel engineering is one of the better degrees to get just in how they train you to think. 

 +1

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