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Starting Out Guidance


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Hi guys,

Enjoyed reading around the forum, blog and alot of videos and the sky sports golf channel over the last few days and im a little obsessed (and overwhelmed) so seeking guidance.

Ive never played before but picked out some golf clubs (not ordered yet) - Callaway Strata 18pc set (LH) 

I was looking at my local course and the membership options etc, they offer a Winter membership from Oct-Mar which is hugely discounted. Given I have no experience does it make sense to spend June-Sept on the on the range and local putting green before tackling the course.

Finally, Ive read alot about handicaps and for now I dont know any other players so initially I will do solo rounds (or random pairings), but to get an official handicap I need a full membership, would it make sense to stay course only for a year or two (and track unofficially) until im more comfortable or would you recommend diving in full hog from the outset?

Appreciate any help and hope Ive posted in the right place

Mike in Scotland - Discovering golf one divot at a time

(Swing Thread)

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Picking up a set of clubs is a good start.  Hitting the range to enjoy your new sticks is a good idea.  It would be ideal to get a couple lessons early on as well, to assure you start out with a good foundation… grip, setup, etc.  Spending time at the range until you’re making good contact will be helpful before your first round.  From there, go at whatever pace you’re feeling good about.  If you know someone who plays regularly, ask them if they’ll let you join them for for a round to show you the ropes on the course (and buy them a beer after).

Welcome to the game, good luck, and keep us posted!

Hold off on the handicap until you have at least a handful of rounds under your belt.

Edited by Denny Bang Bang
handicap
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First get yourself pro lessons so that you understand the swing and have all your fundamentals in place.

Second, spend time at the driving range grooving a good swing based on the lessons you have taken.  If you hit the range without lessons, you are very likely to groove bad habits that may well limit how much you can improve.

Third, consider cheap membership at a club.  However, not sure how much value there is in a winter membership where playing is extremely difficult.  I assume it will snow where you live and possibly rain as well in Scotland during that period.

 

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Thanks for the feedback, I'll be honest I hadn't given much thought to lessons with the pro. I saw online that alot struggle with left handed players so I just went on a video binge to pick up some basics. I've reached out to the club now to enquire if they can support me and if not guide me to another nearby club that can (theirs a dozen courses within 20miles).

The site I was reading recommended 3 lessons to start to get the fundementals, does this seem right to you?

I've also enquired on membership options, the last few years although its got cold our conditions havent been to bad and at £150 for 6months, 4 of which should be somewhat playable I feel thats a fairly solid intro price, but if the membership is pro-rata I could possibly bring the timeline forward to get some actual sun in.

Mike in Scotland - Discovering golf one divot at a time

(Swing Thread)

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@IceMike - Depends on how much you practice after the three lessons.  If you just assume the lessons are enough, then you will probably ingrain bad habits while on the driving range.  If you practice what the pro teaches you, that should be enough to get you started.  However, after a couple of weeks of range practice I would suggest going back to the pro to ensure you are actually practicing right.

If you are able to get 4 months of decent play out of 150 pounds, membership might not be so bad an idea.

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What's in the bag

  • Taylor Made r5 dual Draw 9.5* (stiff)
  • Cobra Baffler 4H (stiff)
  • Taylor Made RAC OS 6-9,P,S (regular)
  • Golden Bear LD5.0 60* (regular)
  • Aidia Z-009 Putter
  • Inesis Soft 500 golf ball
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@IceMike,

Check out this thread. It has all the basics. You can also post your swing in the Members swing section. Don’t be shy about it either. It will accelerate your learning.

 

Scott

Titleist, Edel, Scotty Cameron Putter, Snell - AimPoint - Evolvr - MirrorVision

My Swing Thread

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If I had it to do all over again, I would have got lessons from the start. Didn't want to spend the money, but DIY probably led me to a lot of problems. A lot of compensations that temporarily produced some sort of result, but couldn't be sustained. Can't help but think a better foundation from the start would have prevented a lot of that. 

Setting a particular length of time before you try things out on the course probably isn't really necessary. Just consider how you are doing on the range. If the ball is flying in the general direction you intend it to go, why not hit the course? Don't think you can really know if you even like the game until you do. 

Ideally, pick an easy, wide-open course for your first rounds. Don't be afraid to pick up on a hole if things go sideways. Getting real wrapped up in the score shouldn't be a priority at this point. 

There is probably no need to worry about a handicap when you are just getting started. The only real use for a handicap is for competition and you'll presumably want to get your feet wet first.

 

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Following on from the advice here I had a chat with the local club pro. He's able to support me even as left handed which is a positive

Im currently with a physio for my back so no golf for atleast 6weeks, however he suggested a couple of lessons to give me the basics then practise on the range. They have a studio I can book for £10/hr to give me some feedback on how im progressing beyond the range (and find my club range). Then I can pop in a refresher with them before I head onto the course.

Cant wait to get started, for now though need to focus on fixing my back so I can move forward pain free (hopefully)

Mike in Scotland - Discovering golf one divot at a time

(Swing Thread)

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  • 1 month later...

I hope that I have got you before you have made any purchases. If you are a brand new golfer and you are left handed then you want to buy right handed clubs. You will have a much better experience playing golf if you do this. When you are new to golf, then it won't feel akward to you so this can only really be done if you are a complete beginner. I'm a scratch golfer and I am right handed and if I tried to swing left handed, I might not hit the ball. I wish I had learned this before and I am envious of people that are new and starting out and are smart enough to ask for advice as they start their journey. 

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