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thumper07

Bulls Eye putters the best?

41 posts in this topic

i found a wierd stat that show Corey Pavin, 1rst in total putts per round, and Bob Tway, 1rst in putts per GIR, both use Titleist Bulls Eye putters. Is it something about these putters or what? I never really heard much about them before. They seem so simple maybe they just allow you to putt more relaxed maybe, i dont know. Can someone explain why these putters work so well.

-matt

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i found a wierd stat that show Corey Pavin, 1rst in total putts per round, and Bob Tway, 1rst in putts per GIR, both use Titleist Bulls Eye putters. Is it something about these putters or what? I never really heard much about them before. They seem so simple maybe they just allow you to putt more relaxed maybe, i dont know. Can someone explain why these putters work so well.

I found a Scotty Cameron Bullseye Blade without a flange.

I use a pendulum motion and set the club in the middle with the ball just in front of it. Since it is center shafted, it works for me swing. Because it has a low MOI, you have to hit it correctly every time. When it is hit correctly, it feels softer than any other putter that I have tried. They work so well due to the simplicity, feel and feedback. But it is the person doing the putting, not the putter that has to do the work. I switched from a Yes Marilyn Mallet to a Scotty Cameron Newport 2 to a Bullseye.
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Those guys would probably be the best putters no matter what they used.
I used to have a Bulls-Eye and its a pretty good putter. Its not very forgiving, but you can definetly feel when you mis-hit the ball, which IMO helps you to diagnose the flaws in your putting stroke.
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Man, I loved my Bullseye. I thought I lost it but it resurfaced in may garage and I am restoring it - basically polishing the head with brasso, and getting a new shgaft and grip.

I think - and I may "misremember" this - that the bullseye was the preferred putter on the PGA tour in the 70s and early 80s. These could be had for about $35 at any golf retailer back in the day.

All in all, the Bullseye and the Anser were what putters were made to be IMHO.

Paul
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i have a friend who plays with a bullseye. he loves it and i have used it many times a love it. i have just never found one in good condition, which i am still looking for. the feel is incredible because it is probably the most simplified putter you can use. i also like the fact that it is identical on both sides of the head so you can build up your right eye if you are a left eye dominant, right handed putter
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I think - and I may "misremember" this - that the bullseye was the preferred putter on the PGA tour in the 70s and early 80s. These could be had for about $35 at any golf retailer back in the day.

It was and I actually just got one, could not be happier with it. Nothing fancy, easy to align and great feedback. I used to prefer mallet type putters but when i found thisd in a used club section of a golf store and tested it. i got hooked ever since

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It may be a great putter, but I think that they have just used the putter all their life and just dont thik it's worth switching and ruining their touch.
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I recently switched from a semi-mallet to a classic blade (Macgregor Tourney IMG5). I've always been a "feel" putter, and the blade really helps in that regard. I can't explain it but the alignment is just automatic with it. It also really excels for downhill breakers, just a little tap and it is good. The only thing that I'm having trouble with it long lags on slow greens (especially in wet conditions), I have left some very short.
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IIRC, and correct me if I am wrong, Corey Pavin is one of the best putter's that has ever been on the tour. But like a few have said "it's the indian not the arrow." I feel that the best putter is the one that fits you and your stroke.
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IIRC, and correct me if I am wrong, Corey Pavin is one of the best putter's that has ever been on the tour. But like a few have said "it's the indian not the arrow." I feel that the best putter is the one that fits you and your stroke.

Can't argue with you on that.

This putter fits me and my stroke so far
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IIRC, and correct me if I am wrong, Corey Pavin is one of the best putter's that has ever been on the tour. But like a few have said "it's the indian not the arrow." I feel that the best putter is the one that fits you and your stroke.

This is most likely the best answer here. I have tried many a putter including the Bullseye and foud the best for me is an Anser 4. Hands down, I'll never change, end of story. I feels so right and I have the best touch and most confidance with it, and that is where it lays, confidence.
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I had to revive this old thread. I found a Bulls Eye in good shape at Play It Again Sports last fall for $5.99. When I was growing up, everybody had one of these, the pros, and all the guys at the country club where I caddied. I really wanted one. Well, I found one, and guess what? I have never putted better. Something about it just fits the way I putt, because I feel like a surgeon on the greens. I was using a Ping G2 Tess, which isn't bad, but it was just this thing in my hands. The Bulls Eye is my partner and we do great work together. My playing partners say I exude much more confidence than before putting with this club.

It's an Acushnet John Reuter, Jr. model, with the OS M 5 S stamped on it. If anyone knows that that means, I'd appreciate hearing about it.
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I've still occasionally bag my original Achusnet Bullseye putter. non flange model. still a great putter especially on slick greens.
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I still use my SC Bullseye blade putter. Nothing gives me the same feel and feedback. I have a SC Newport and it is not the same to me.
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I used an Acushnet Bullseye putter during the 1970s, and had good days and bad days with it. I looked at it this week, and I know what the problem was: too upright a lie for my setup, and about 1.5" too long. This was back before most people got fitted for putters; you just picked it up and used it.

One advantage: The dense metal head was super for longer "Texas wedge" shots from off the green without having to kill the ball.
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Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Glad I found this thread. Today had rain in the forecast so I went to a used club store. They must've had 150 putters - everything - most all models, and a little 15' putting matt. You might be thinking "This guy's a +2, so why does he want a new putter?" Three words... Fred Couples Administaff.... Did you see him putt? wow! that was a display - he routed Pavin, and was just unstoppable. When asked about posting his 29 on the back he said "...I obviously putted really well." That is an understatement. He was on-fire!!!

Back to the story... I spent at least 45 minutes going through each putter that suited my eye, and even those those didn't. Now, before I go on I'll say this... I currently own 11 putters, and I've owned many more than just these. I don't stay with a single putter for more than a month or so and have fell susceptible to all the hype marketing that's out there now about grooves, scotty, yes!, seemore, etc. I think the best marketing done is the Rossa group and the "research" they've done and data they have collected wrt putts. As such I was there today to look at and use the AGSI "S" in a Monza Spider. Not to mention Couples uses a Rossa Imola 6 belly... And they had one...

Back to the experiment.. I made four 10' putts with each putter model I picked up, and when the putt felt really good I put the putter to the side. After 30 or more minutes I had five putters set aside. a Ping belly... a Rossa Imola 6 belly... an original Ping Anser... the Monza Spider AGSI S... a black Bullseye with white site line. With all these putters I made good strokes and the putts fell.

Then it was between these five... I'll spare putt by putt, but after an additional 20 minutes in a "putt off" there was no comparison in my mind and I'm the proud owner of a new/used $20 putter. It's funny how the absolute bare minimum design sets up with (my current opinion) such a great feel for line and puts such a wicked little hit on the ball. No grooves, no "Scotty", no frills - this is a flanged soft piece of metal with a single site line on the end of a stick... it's 34" I'm excited to go out tomorrow and see what falls! I'll do a follow-up because we all know the way you perform indoors isn't always the same as you perform outdoors.
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Here is another angle to consider. The bullseye is an old putter, and the stats the OP presented are from golfers decades ago. There were fewer choices back then, and perhaps more importantly, greens were not prepared for tournaments they way they are today given advancements in turf management, hybrid grasses and mower/roller technologies available today.

The difference between a modern PGA Tour even green and your local muni is more similar to putting on a concrete garage floor than a putting green.
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Here is another angle to consider. The bullseye is an old putter, and the stats the OP presented are from golfers decades ago. There were fewer choices back then, and perhaps more importantly, greens were not prepared for tournaments they way they are today given advancements in turf management, hybrid grasses and mower/roller technologies available today.

Huh? I'm not clear on the point you're trying to make here.

On topic, I had a Bullseye Standard as a junior which I loved and, for some reason, got rid of over the years. Just bought an original 35R Wide Flange model off the Bay in decent condition and it's something else. Can't wait to get on the course with it. Simple lines, easy to set up/align and lovely feel. Beginning to think a lot of the modern putters are over-rated. A Bullseye may have a smaller sweet spot but to be honest, if you can't hit the CoG frequently with a putter there's little hope anyway!
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