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bigbear43

Expensive putters, are they worth it

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Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond

I have one of those... the Edel Vari-Loft, and haven't looked at another putter since its delivery over two years ago.

(It's already paid for itself)


Awesome to hear! I'm picking up a Vari-Loft as well. Please start another thread talking about your putter, maybe post some pictures...

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Originally Posted by iacas

Awesome to hear! I'm picking up a Vari-Loft as well. Please start another thread talking about your putter, maybe post some pictures...


It may take a couple of days, but will do.

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as others have said.... it is only worth it if it works for you.   I truely believe putters are as unique as we are individuals.  It's all about feel.  If a $20 Walmart Ram mallet putter works for you, great!

I putted for years with some never-heard-off brand putter called "Golfology" for god sakes.  It was a great putter!    I play a Scotty now because i like the balance, weight, milled face and the abililty to customize it.    I probably don't put any better with it than I did with my old "Golfology" putter I picked up at a garage sale.

Forget price.  Putt with as many putters as you can until you find one that feels good to you - then look at the price tag.

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No matter how much you paid for your putter,leave the price tag on it.  If you leave the price tagon,the putter doesn't know you own it. Therefore,putts will drop from everywhere. As soon as the price tag comes off,the well will dry up quickly!  Please take this advice seriously!!! I have been playing golf for 57 years and a golf professional for 38 years,so I know what I am talking about(sometimes).  I have given this advice before on this forum,but for the newbies -take heed.

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Originally Posted by mlf16507

No matter how much you paid for your putter,leave the price tag on it.  If you leave the price tagon,the putter doesn't know you own it. Therefore,putts will drop from everywhere. As soon as the price tag comes off,the well will dry up quickly!  Please take this advice seriously!!! I have been playing golf for 57 years and a golf professional for 38 years,so I know what I am talking about(sometimes).  I have given this advice before on this forum,but for the newbies -take heed.



Damn!  I wish I had know that tip.   So...since I'm too late for leaving the tag on....If my putter goes cold on me......would continous threats of selling it on CraigsList make it start behaving again?

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Originally Posted by bigbear43

Just a question I wanted to ask to everyone. Looking at putters at Golf Galaxy the other day and everyone was over $100, most over $150 and some were $250. I see the price and technolgy involved in other clubs such as drivers irons wedges etc were full swing come  into place shft flex, head deflection etc, Alot takes place during a normal golf swing and I see and understand why quality drivers and irons cost so much; but putters just basicly tap or guide the ball there is no or very minimal shaft flex, the head does no compress to propel the ball. Just basically asking everyone if they think an expensive putter and or putter technology is worth it, or is it just the person an there abilities that make them a good putter and not the actual putter itself. That said I understand that many putters and putter companies have there own sight alignment systems and I understand those are important, but I am basically asking about the materials used and so on not alignment tools.

Mine is built from Golfsmith components that cost about $60.  As long as it suits you, price doesn't matter.  I can always find a putter that works for me in the low to mid range.  The most I've ever paid for one is $84 for an Odyssey, but that was at least 10 years ago.

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I think that if you can afford it, go ahead and do it!! however, I will say that expensive putters do seem to offer the least amount of technology for your money. I believe that you are paying more for personal confidence than actual technology. My Odyssey White Ice 1 was $130, and I really enjoy the feel of it, so I guess it is whatever you like that gives you confidence.

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Is a $300+ putter better in any absolute sense than a $50 putter?  "Absolutely" not.  It's just a question of whether it fits you.

I saw it mentioned upthread, but I'll echo: do your best to ignore price tags when you test drive putters.  Sadly, this is really hard to do since the marketing divisions want to be sure you recognize the expensive ones...  Still, the only important thing is whether it feels good and fits your stroke.  If price instills confidence for you, then that's worth something I suppose.

My ideal approach for putter testing would be to go with a friend who knows my budget.  His job is to look at the price tags and make sure I don't test one that's out of my price range.  Other than that, I don't want to know anything except how the putter looks and how it feels.

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go to the big retail stores and try putters out to see what you like.  Then go home and look up used versions on ebay that cost a fraction of what a new one does.   I just bought a nice used rife 2 bar mallet hybrid putter for $32 on ebay+$14 shipping, the same putter brand new is anywhere from $170-$200.   Make sure its a reputable seller with a a high feedback rating and that they also have pics of the putter to make sure its exactly what you think it is and you can visually see the condition.   A good putter DOES help, ive already seen benefits from replacing my cheapo putter.  No they dont perform miracles and make you sink every putt but they will give you a more consistent and straighter roll.

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Originally Posted by SouthernILGolfer

go to the big retail stores and try putters out to see what you like.  Then go home and look up used versions on ebay that cost a fraction of what a new one does.   I just bought a nice used rife 2 bar mallet hybrid putter for $32 on ebay+$14 shipping, the same putter brand new is anywhere from $170-$200.   Make sure its a reputable seller with a a high feedback rating and that they also have pics of the putter to make sure its exactly what you think it is and you can visually see the condition.   A good putter DOES help, ive already seen benefits from replacing my cheapo putter.  No they dont perform miracles and make you sink every putt but they will give you a more consistent and straighter roll.


I agree with trying and buying elsewhere. I personally don't chance buying golf clubs on eBay but that's because I'm afraid of getting sold fake wares. I do however go to various different online retailers after trying clubs in my local retail store if the price warrants it.

Regarding 'good putters' they help only if your mind says they help. Your cheapo putter didn't instill confidence in your putting stroke, therefore your putting wasn't as good as it is with a more expensive putter. That's the reason we all go and try putters out before we buy them. I use a Ping iWi Anser because I love the feeling and sound of the ball off the face, I love the 'Goldilocks' weighting in the club and I love the two angles in the grip; for me it's great. In January however I was tasked with helping a mate just starting out in golf to find a cheap putter. We found one less than a quarter of the price of my own but which felt amazing off the face, was a great weight and which I'd happily use myself. Price doesn't always equal better.

Consistency and straighter roll solely from the putter itself is a fallacy. Any object with a face perpendicular to the target will propel the ball in the same direction, be it an Edel putter (mmm Edel!) or the back of a woodman's axe. Consistency comes with practice using whatever putter you're happy with, not from the putter itself.

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I started out with a slazenger mallet putter that was $30 bucks new and I could not sink a darn putt with it.  I ended up buying a used TaylorMade Modena 8 CGB used and can tell a huge difference.  I know the TM is not the best putter out there, but it sure is an improvement from what I had.

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Are expensive putters worth it?  Yes and no.

I have been collecting putters for 40 years.  I also make/modify putters.  I have at least 100 putters - it's a disease.  As luck would have it, I invented a putter shaft, which I am patenting.  While I await the gifted ones at the USPTO to take action, I decided to manufacture and sell putters.  Some time this year I will be selling putters.  They will be VERY expensive.  Are they worth it?  You betcha.

Having said that, I would never pay $100 for a putter.  Why?  Because I'm cheap, I don't have a whole lot of money, and putters are just weighted sticks.  I estimate there are 60,000,000 putters in the world.  Surely you can find one that works that somebody will sell you for under $100.  However, a putter that "works" is worth a lot of money.

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Originally Posted by Rafiki

Are expensive putters worth it?  Yes and no.

I have been collecting putters for 40 years.  I also make/modify putters.  I have at least 100 putters - it's a disease.  As luck would have it, I invented a putter shaft, which I am patenting.  While I await the gifted ones at the USPTO to take action, I decided to manufacture and sell putters.  Some time this year I will be selling putters.  They will be VERY expensive.  Are they worth it?  You betcha.

Having said that, I would never pay $100 for a putter.  Why?  Because I'm cheap, I don't have a whole lot of money, and putters are just weighted sticks.  I estimate there are 60,000,000 putters in the world.  Surely you can find one that works that somebody will sell you for under $100.  However, a putter that "works" is worth a lot of money.


What a confusing post! ;)


How will customers know that your "VERY expensive" putters will "work" to know that they're worth it? There's no way I'd buy a putter without having tried it out in person as it could be to heavy/light/fat/thin/toe-weighted/heel-weighted etc

Also if you're not willing to pay $100 for a "weighted stick" yourself what makes you think other people will be willing to pay out for your own design of putter?

Will your putters be conforming to all USGA rules?

Not trying to be a pain; I just don't understand your plan.

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Yes, I agree, it is confusing.  I guess it's what they call irony:  I would never buy an expensive putter, but lots of people will, and I'm more than happy to sell them one.  Hopefully I can post a link to my website in the not too distant future and you can judge the putter for yourself.

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I agree with the folks advising to buy used.  I went to my local golf store, tried every single model they had, then went home and ordered a used Odyssey mallet for $60.  It was "on sale" at the store for $140.  The more I get into this sport/obsession the more I discover that a lot of people trade in almost brand new clubs to get the latest and greatest.  I can live with hand-me-downs that are basically in like-new condition.

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Originally Posted by Nole77

I agree with the folks advising to buy used.  I went to my local golf store, tried every single model they had, then went home and ordered a used Odyssey mallet for $60.  It was "on sale" at the store for $140.  The more I get into this sport/obsession the more I discover that a lot of people trade in almost brand new clubs to get the latest and greatest.  I can live with hand-me-downs that are basically in like-new condition.


The other argument here for buying second hand is that many people buy clubs based solely on reviews and then realise that the clubs are entirely wrong for them so they trade them in. One man's junk is another man's treasure.

For me I prefer new where possible, however I'm fine with buying second hand if I can see the product in my hands and am happy with the condition of it. My step-father absolutely *loves* car boot sales and finding golf club gems at them for very cheap. He's picked up a lot of nice clubs through car boots.

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Note: This thread is 3487 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

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