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VegasRenegade

What part of the swing do you or did you find the hardest to learn.

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  1. 1. What part of the swing do you or did you find the hardest to learn.

    • Take away
      7
    • Wrist hinge
      9
    • Top of the back swing
      14
    • Droping into the slot
      30
    • Impact
      27
    • Follow through
      7

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49 posts in this topic

For me this time around so far it is the impact position. So many things that

Can go wrong.

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Well, here's the thing. If the impact position is good the rest doesn't really matter.
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Originally Posted by VegasRenegade

For me this time around so far it is the impact position. So many things that

Can go wrong.

For me, the hardest part was, and still is, proper set up and alignment. It's much easier for my setup to get out of whack than anything else. Problems in my swing are almost always a direct result of improper ball position, posture, etc.

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Originally Posted by Ernest Jones

Well, here's the thing. If the impact position is good the rest doesn't really matter.

True but you  have to do something to reach impact with some club head speed.

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Originally Posted by VegasRenegade

True but you  have to do something to reach impact with some club head speed.

I think his point was that if your impact position is correct, then everything else has to work. It's about like asking what the most important step in a recipe is getting a reply of "the way it tastes".

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For me it was learning to do the takeaway by moving only my shoulders while keeping my head still and not swaying to the sides. It took me two years to teach my body to do it. Doing swings in front of a mirror and filming my swing helped a lot,

This has allowed me to stay on plane and make solid and consistent contact every time.

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i chose impact - specifically with casting.

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I think his point was that if your impact position is correct, then everything else has to work. It's about like asking what the most important step in a recipe is getting a reply of "the way it tastes".

Yes. That was my point, I didn't mean it to come off as snarky. I chose impact because everything else is working towards impact. Kinda hard to say,"I found follow through gave me a lot of trouble but getting into impact properly was a breeze"

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Originally Posted by Ernest Jones

Quote:

Originally Posted by geauxforbroke

I think his point was that if your impact position is correct, then everything else has to work. It's about like asking what the most important step in a recipe is getting a reply of "the way it tastes".

Yes. That was my point, I didn't mean it to come off as snarky. I chose impact because everything else is working towards impact. Kinda hard to say,"I found follow through gave me a lot of trouble but getting into impact properly was a breeze"

I knew what your were getting at I was just yanking your chain. That being said I find it quite simple to get a good impact position if I go super slow but at even half speed some part of it always falls apart. If the hip turn is good hands are late etc.

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I knew what your were getting at I was just yanking your chain. That being said I find it quite simple to get a good impact position if I go super slow but at even half speed some part of it always falls apart. If the hip turn is good hands are late etc.

Sorry, took it as a given that we were talking about getting into a good impact position at "speed". Obviously it is fairly easy to 'place' yourself in a good position provided you know what a good impact position looks like. A lot of people still believe impact looks very much like A1 (address)

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For me it was follow through.  I struggled with a chicken wing and blocks for a long time.  Heck, sometimes I still do...

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For me its the impact position, i my upper center is really bad at not falling back,

I have the same problem...my upper center goes forward with my hips, causing me to cast the club in an effort to make decent contact.

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I need to think smooth, sweeping motion with the club in the takeaway, especially with long irons to driver, if i don't, i have a tendency to smother hook my shots. My "feel" move on the downswing (to keep from casting) is to drop my arms behind me.

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For me, it's getting the swing into the slot.  Various people can have a different take away, grip, wrist hinge, position at the top, etc, however ALL good golfers regardless of the differences I mentioned drop the club beautifully into the slot WHICH results in the impact position that we all desire to consistently have.

When I was at a recent Tour event on the range, I saw a collection of different swings but man, do they ALL drop it into the slot and THAT is what I think is the hardest part of the swing to get right.

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I don't have problems with any of the swing parts per se, but when I have tempo issues, any one or all of those swing parts can go awry. My worst problem is when the confidence meter is low, my transition from backswing to downswing is really quick or actually non-existent.

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I couldn't agree with you more.  After toiling for 4 years on endless impact, wrist hinge, drop-it-in-the-slot, take away and follow-though drills with minimal results.  I finally realized that no matter how many drills I do if my biomechanical geometries (proper setup, posture, alignment, grip and ball position) aren't correct to begin with, I'll always have a helluva time hitting the ball consistently.  For me I needed to "stack" or keep inline my shoulder sockets with my knee caps with the balls of my feet.  Also, it's important that my arms are relaxed so that when I let my bottom hand (closest to club head) go it falls naturally perpendicular to the grip directly across from where I gripped it.  What did this mean for me?  It meant that I needed to move away from the ball with my irons and toward the ball with my driver.  I've also found that coordinating my aim line, eye line, ball position and swing path for the specific shot shape I want to produce is absolutely key to consistency.  In other words, if I want to hit a draw I need to aim my body, eyeline and clubface right of my target, place ball position farther back and swing out to the right even farther.  This way the geometry makes sense.  By aiming and swing out to "right field" you're clubface will come in more shallow and bottom out sooner so you need to play the ball back.  Even if you're doing you're best to move your weight forward the club is still going to bottom out sooner.  You can't expect to produce a consistent draw if you aim and swing right but play the ball forward.  You'll chunk it every time and no drill will fix that.  It's geometry and physics.  The problem I've found with trying to hit it straight is that you've absolutely got to nail your ball position or you'll end up going one way or the other.  I've found you can be off a bit with your ball position if you're deliberately trying to hit a draw of fade.  Why?  Because when you're hitting a draw or fade everything in your swing is focused on producing it whereas with a straight shot you've basically got to have a single plane.  Most people have a tendency to come too far inside (draw) or too far outside (fade) so you may be aimed straight, have perfect ball position, but if you're tendency gets in the way it could be hook or slice city.  Just my 2...well a lot more than 2 cents:)

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None of the above.  For me, as silly stupid as this seems, I still have a hard time with having my weight/pressure on the front foot at impact.  Maybe I could check "impact", but the real problem always comes back to not getting my weight transferred.

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