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Rory's Putting Swing Thought - Golf Digest

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Rory McIlroy relied on two code words as triggers during his wire-to-wire win at Hoylake, "process" for full shots and "spot" for putts. Both keys obviously did what they were supposed to do, but McIlroy's putting was particularly stellar. He made 20 birdies and two eagles, and one-putted 34 out of 72 greens on his way to the third leg of the career grand slam.
The "spot" idea comes from his work with putting guru Dave Stockton, and it's an easy technique for any player to copy. "Rory -- and anybody else -- putts the best when he's seeing and feeling his line, getting up there and rolling the ball on that line in a nice rhythm," says Stockton, who has worked with McIlroy since the lead-up to his record-setting 2011 U.S. Open win.

Stockton teaches players to begin to set their stance while looking out at the line -- not at the ball. "I get my eyes set on my line, and then only look down a split second before I start my stroke, but I'm not looking at the ball. I pick a spot an inch or two in front of the ball," says Stockton. "The stroke isn't a conscious thing. I'm just watching for the ball to roll over that spot."

http://www.golfdigest.com/blogs/the-loop/2014/07/how-he-hit-that-rory-mcilroys.html

For more information on Stockton's method, check out Dave Stockton's book:

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I also heard about Rory's two helpful hints the other day - process and spot. I read Stockton's book and took some helpful items from it ... especially the focus on the line and rolling over a spot in front of the ball. I've wanted to get away from a ball focus, so I focus on a spot over which to roll the ball.

Can't evaluate the technique as I found out from a recent session on the SAM Lab, that I had "issues" that required correction. Now that I'm technically better, I will focus on line and a spot in front of the ball, and report back when I get some course time.

Stockton also teaches to hold off the wrist, and some say he teaches a block. Or maybe, the holding off of the wrist is a feeling. If it helps roll the ball over  your "spot" ...

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I also heard about Rory's two helpful hints the other day - process and spot. I read Stockton's book and took some helpful items from it ... especially the focus on the line and rolling over a spot in front of the ball. I've wanted to get away from a ball focus, so I focus on a spot over which to roll the ball. Works well on the practice green but hasn't taken hold during a round ... typical, right? It's the Indian....

Stockton also teaches to hold off the wrist, and some say he teaches a block. Or maybe, the holding off of the wrist is a feeling...But if it helps roll the ball over  your "spot" ...

I don't hold off short, but I pretty much do everything else.  I don't take a practice swing next to the ball.  That is another Stockton tip that Rory does.

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I don't hold off short, but I pretty much do everything else.  I don't take a practice swing next to the ball.  That is another Stockton tip that Rory does.

Same here ... no practice swing, which is consistent with Stockton's teaching of focusing on the line.

On "holding off the wrist", maybe it's a method to quiet them. Rors still follows through but possibly the thought has the effect of getting the wrists passive through the stroke.

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Same here ... no practice swing, which is consistent with Stockton's teaching of focusing on the line.

On "holding off the wrist", maybe it's a method to quiet them. Rors still follows through but possibly the thought has the effect of getting the wrists passive through the stroke.

I prefer the practice swing, but I do it just to get a feel for the putting stroke. I can understand Stockton's philosophy on that. It would be similar if a player takes a normal swing for their practice swing (on a full shot) and chunks the practice swing. Then it is in their head. For me, I like taking practice swings looking slightly past the hole, not worrying about the stroke. I just want to get a feel for the weight of the putter.

Yea, Stockton is big on just rolling a putt over a point just in front of the ball. That can feel very "Pushy", or "Hold off the wrist" type of movement.

Kinda reminded me of this. The big three short game / putting instructors and the differences in their putting methods. I am more of a fan of Utley over the other two. I like to feel more wrist hinge right now just because I had a very "Passive Wrist" movement before.

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I also heard about Rory's two helpful hints the other day - process and spot. I read Stockton's book and took some helpful items from it ... especially the focus on the line and rolling over a spot in front of the ball. I've wanted to get away from a ball focus, so I focus on a spot over which to roll the ball.

Can't evaluate the technique as I found out from a recent session on the SAM Lab, that I had "issues" that required correction. Now that I'm technically better, I will focus on line and a spot in front of the ball, and report back when I get some course time.

Stockton also teaches to hold off the wrist, and some say he teaches a block. Or maybe, the holding off of the wrist is a feeling. If it helps roll the ball over  your "spot" ...

Yeah, I've heard this too. That's also the reason he prescribes the weight on the left side, for a little push stroke. Never played enough break so subconsciously he adjusted over time.

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I prefer the practice swing, but I do it just to get a feel for the putting stroke. I can understand Stockton's philosophy on that. It would be similar if a player takes a normal swing for their practice swing (on a full shot) and chunks the practice swing. Then it is in their head. For me, I like taking practice swings looking slightly past the hole, not worrying about the stroke. I just want to get a feel for the weight of the putter.

Yea, Stockton is big on just rolling a putt over a point just in front of the ball. That can feel very "Pushy", or "Hold off the wrist" type of movement.

Kinda reminded me of this. The big three short game / putting instructors and the differences in their putting methods. I am more of a fan of Utley over the other two. I like to feel more wrist hinge right now just because I had a very "Passive Wrist" movement before.

If I was a newbie, I'd be more confused than ever ... lol. Which one???? Argh!

I've tried Utley -- owned it and all of his training aids for a while, watched Sergio when he was with Utley -- I noticed everything is very subtle, the bending, straightening of the elbows, etc.

Stockton discusses a practice stroke - on the way to the ball and looking at the line, giving a stroke motion with the right hand.

Now, I just listen to the guy I pay with the SAM. We'll see if that works.

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I did a test with and without a practice stroke a couple of years back. I noticed that my distance control was just as good, if not better without the practice stroke.  This also happens when I hit three balls in a row to the same target.  My first seems to always be closest.  This is why I stopped taking practice strokes during my routine.  I may do some practice strokes while waiting for someone else just to keep loose.

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I also heard about Rory's two helpful hints the other day - process and spot. I read Stockton's book and took some helpful items from it ... especially the focus on the line and rolling over a spot in front of the ball. I've wanted to get away from a ball focus, so I focus on a spot over which to roll the ball.

Can't evaluate the technique as I found out from a recent session on the SAM Lab, that I had "issues" that required correction. Now that I'm technically better, I will focus on line and a spot in front of the ball, and report back when I get some course time.

Stockton also teaches to hold off the wrist, and some say he teaches a block. Or maybe, the holding off of the wrist is a feeling. If it helps roll the ball over  your "spot" ...

I been finding that "block"  is every elusive to describe, but this statement seems to fit the putting pattern Im developed this week , Im "blocking" my putts , it does feel like Im holding on to my wrist angle and not letting my hands "flip"  . I think this is very much like the "hold "philosophy in Mickelson's DVD

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