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Best set of wedges...

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Hey everyone! At this point, I only have a 56* sand wedge, and I severely need to add a gap wedge as well as a lob wedge. So at this point, a 52*, 56* and 60* would be ideal.

 

If you have any personal recommendations, let me know! I'd be glad to hear what you all think. Thanks in advance. 

post #2 of 29
post #3 of 29

CFC, what is your budget?  I'm playing the SM4 Vokeys and they are legit for a big box retail brand.  And I saw them on sale at my fitters last week for $99/wedge.  So Titelist must have just lowered the MSRP on the SM4's recently?  Because I paid $120ea when they came out last fall.  Heck at $99ea, I'd highly recommend them.

post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachcomber View Post

CFC, what is your budget?  I'm playing the SM4 Vokeys and they are legit for a big box retail brand.  And I saw them on sale at my fitters last week for $99/wedge.  So Titelist must have just lowered the MSRP on the SM4's recently?  Because I paid $120ea when they came out last fall.  Heck at $99ea, I'd highly recommend them.

 

Honestly, it depends on the quality of the club. I could go as low as $140 for a set of Callaway Jaws wedges otherwise maybe up to $250. It's worth it. 

 

Anything in particular that sets the Vokeys apart? I've had them recommended already. 

post #5 of 29

What sets the Vokeys apart is their 3 choices of sole grind in the most popular lofts, 54-60. The head was redesigned and is slightly larger, and then face is heat treated for increased durability of the grooves. It's a fine wedge.

post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 

Anything to say about the X-Series Jaws wedges? 

 

Edit: Last question - If I were to go with two wedges, would it be best to go with a 54 and 58, or 54 and 60. I'm guessing they're won't be much of a difference, but it doesn't hurt to ask. 

post #7 of 29

Get something with a lot of bounce.  And pay a lot of attention to feel (construction) and swingweight.  Those three factors are probably the most important, IMO.  Beyond that, shaft flex, COG location and grind, in that order.  Wedges are wedges.  Don't break the bank unless you just want to.  Try out all the "gold standards" first.  Hit some Vokeys, see if you like the look of the leading edge.  Grab some Clevelands, shape is different, feel is different.  Find out what kind of wedge you like to look at, then just settle on a brand and find one with the features I mentioned.

post #8 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bunkerputt View Post

Get something with a lot of bounce.  And pay a lot of attention to feel (construction) and swingweight.  Those three factors are probably the most important, IMO.  Beyond that, shaft flex, COG location and grind, in that order.  Wedges are wedges.  Don't break the bank unless you just want to.  Try out all the "gold standards" first.  Hit some Vokeys, see if you like the look of the leading edge.  Grab some Clevelands, shape is different, feel is different.  Find out what kind of wedge you like to look at, then just settle on a brand and find one with the features I mentioned.

 

Very insightful. Much appreciated!

post #9 of 29

I have a buddy who spares no expense on golf equipment and money is no object to him. He just bought the Bridgestone J40 Black, a Callaway Forged, Cobra Big Trusty Rusty and the Adams Tom Watson classic. He purchased them all in similar bounce and all 60° and told me that he personally prefers either the Bridgestone, Cobra's Trusty Rusty or the Adam's Tom Watson.

 

The Tom Watson Classic wedges are severely underrated, as are some Tour Edge products. Cost isn't everything and when you pay $100-150 for a wedge, you're also paying for the marketing cost of the brand (paying for the name, obviously).

 

I'm not one to talk because I love my Cobra equipment, but I did personally pick up a Tour Edge TSG (Triple-Sole-Grind) 56° and 60° and I love them more than I did my vokeys. The Vokey didn't hold up very well, was very soft and dinged up really bad and I do not like seeing rust on my clubs - regardless if they're "supposed to rust". I want a clean, 304 stainless or better, clubhead that will stand up to wear and tear of normal play and remain in visibly good condition. The grooves on the Watson and TourEdge wedges are also lasting much longer than we thought they would.

 

Just some feedback from a Cobra-biased golfer who is well aware that some "non-household" names are putting out good quality clubs at half cost.

post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by bunkerputt View Post

Get something with a lot of bounce.  And pay a lot of attention to feel (construction) and swingweight.  Those three factors are probably the most important, IMO.  Beyond that, shaft flex, COG location and grind, in that order.  Wedges are wedges.  Don't break the bank unless you just want to.  Try out all the "gold standards" first.  Hit some Vokeys, see if you like the look of the leading edge.  Grab some Clevelands, shape is different, feel is different.  Find out what kind of wedge you like to look at, then just settle on a brand and find one with the features I mentioned.

Can't say I agree - COG? Seriously? Yeah, see that in marketing materials all the time. Shaft flex? They're all about the same in OEM wedges - S200, S300, Spinner +, Spinner. All OEM wedges are mostly D4, D5, D6. It's not as if it fluctuates greatly between wedges.

 

What fluctuates between OEMs is head shape and grind.

 

Wedges are not wedges. If that were true, it would be an easy decision - it's not, not if you know what you're doing.

 

Appearance is first - a wedge has got to look good or you don't have confidence.

If it looks good, sole grind (and bounce). It's what interacts with the turf and allows versatility.

 

And yeah, 54, and then 58 or 60 is a good combo. Some think they can do more with a 58 than a 60. I grew accustomed to a 60 after having a 58. You get a little more backspin with a 60.

 

Have fun.

post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by CentralFC View Post

Anything to say about the X-Series Jaws wedges? 

 

Edit: Last question - If I were to go with two wedges, would it be best to go with a 54 and 58, or 54 and 60. I'm guessing they're won't be much of a difference, but it doesn't hurt to ask. 

I have the X-Jaws slate finish wedges. They are incredible. I used to have a couple Cleveland 588's and I can tell that they are both Roger Cleveland's spawns. I have a 50*8, 54*12, 58*8, and a 60*0 although I rarely ever take the 60 out of the garage bag. Its too tough to hit consistently. I love them especially the 58. The 50 has become my go to chipping club and the 54 has only seen sand, unfortunately rather frequently. I paid 119 for all four of them but they have since gone on sale for 89 I think, but either way worth every penny to me.

post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post

Can't say I agree - COG? Seriously? Yeah, see that in marketing materials all the time. Shaft flex? They're all about the same in OEM wedges - S200, S300, Spinner +, Spinner. All OEM wedges are mostly D4, D5, D6. It's not as if it fluctuates greatly between wedges.

 

What fluctuates between OEMs is head shape and grind.

 

Wedges are not wedges. If that were true, it would be an easy decision - it's not, not if you know what you're doing.

 

Appearance is first - a wedge has got to look good or you don't have confidence.

If it looks good, sole grind (and bounce). It's what interacts with the turf and allows versatility.

 

And yeah, 54, and then 58 or 60 is a good combo. Some think they can do more with a 58 than a 60. I grew accustomed to a 60 after having a 58. You get a little more backspin with a 60.

 

Have fun.

Thank you for the response!

Quote:
Originally Posted by GatorCallaway View Post

I have the X-Jaws slate finish wedges. They are incredible. I used to have a couple Cleveland 588's and I can tell that they are both Roger Cleveland's spawns. I have a 50*8, 54*12, 58*8, and a 60*0 although I rarely ever take the 60 out of the garage bag. Its too tough to hit consistently. I love them especially the 58. The 50 has become my go to chipping club and the 54 has only seen sand, unfortunately rather frequently. I paid 119 for all four of them but they have since gone on sale for 89 I think, but either way worth every penny to me.

I was looking at the 54.12 and 58.8. Would you believe that those two, plus a PW, would be enough to get me around?

post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by CentralFC View Post

Thank you for the response!

I was looking at the 54.12 and 58.8. Would you believe that those two, plus a PW, would be enough to get me around?

That would be more than enough. I played strictly PW and SW for years. In fact I think that's a better way to play, you learn more ways to use less clubs. The gap wedge is always my first club out of the bag for a 2 hybrid or now my 5W I just got. Think about it this way: a gap wedge was a pitching wedge until companies got the bright idea to lower the lofts, claim added distance, and basically force us, the consumer, to buy more clubs. How many sets do you see advertised that go 2 iron-sand wedge these days? None. They normally go 4-A from what I see as a base set. The 2 became the 3, 3 became 4, so on and so forth. They threw a gap wedge in there so you would buy a sand wedge. Don't get me wrong, I climbed on the marketing ship myself. My set of Razr X HL came 4-A. I bought the 3 hybrid and sand wedge after the fact.

post #14 of 29

Vokey SM4s or Cleveland 588 series, I had Ping Tour before and loved those aswell.

post #15 of 29

I have a Titleist Triple Grind Sole 60 degree Lob Wedge in Beryllium Copper head with a steel shaft.  I haven't seen many of these offered anywhere so I expect the folks that purchased them do not give them up easily.  I also have a Copper Classic Pitching Wedge in Beryllium copper that seems to be part of a set currently offered by someone else on eBay.  I have contacted that individual to see if they want the pitching wedge, but it is always first come, first served.  Let me know if you have an interest in one or both.

post #16 of 29
I've always played Cleveland 588 wedges after taking my PING EYE wedges out of play. A lot of people feel grind and loft are important, and they are, but make sure you like how it looks behind the ball. Confidence is key to a solid short game.
post #17 of 29

I've been using Cleveland 588's and really like them. There is a $15.00 instant rebate right now at most local golf stores.

post #18 of 29

I showed up at a tournament last week to discover that my caddie had put my wedge in the wrong bag the previous day. I had to buy a wedge from the pro shop during my practice round and all they had in 58* was a Callaway X-Jaws. The club would be great but it is tearing the cover off of my Pro VX1 golf balls. The ball spins like crazy but the cover gets shredded after each shot. I also have to scrape the cover shaving out of the grooves after each shot.

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