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Amazing shot made, unless!!!!

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

http://www.cbssports.com/collegebasketball/eye-on-college-basketball/24379779/ncaa-says-refs-got-call-correct-at-end-of-gulf-coastusf-game

 

So the rule is, if the player possesses the ball with 0.3 seconds or less than the play is over. The theory is, it is impossible to posses the ball and shoot the ball before the clock runs out. Unless you are the player above, who beat the clock. 

 

Here's an example of the NCAA just being lazy. With the creation of HD video, just review the call at the end of the game. It takes 5 minutes at most. you hardly get the 0.3 and less shot anyways. 

post #2 of 12

Wow ... what the hell was the point of looking at the video replay if you're not going to, you know, actually look at the video replay???  You could see, quite clearly, that the ball was out of his hand prior to the backboard light coming on.

 

Wait, check that.  I just went and read the story and there is a specific rule that over-rides the clock in the situation of 0.3 seconds or less.  So it sounds like they did it exactly right.  If a player "possesses" the ball, meaning he doesn't simply tap it, then its over.  It's, presumably, them acknowledging that the amount of time it takes to grab the ball then let go cannot possibly be less than 0.3 seconds, so let's take it out of the hands of the time clock operator at that point.

 

Is that a fair rule?  I don't know.  But it does seem like they applied it right.

post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 

http://www.cbssports.com/collegebasketball/eye-on-college-basketball/24379779/ncaa-says-refs-got-call-correct-at-end-of-gulf-coastusf-game

 

So the rule is, if the player possesses the ball with 0.3 seconds or less than the play is over. The theory is, it is impossible to posses the ball and shoot the ball before the clock runs out. Unless you are the player above, who beat the clock. 

 

Here's an example of the NCAA just being lazy. With the creation of HD video, just review the call at the end of the game. It takes 5 minutes at most. you hardly get the 0.3 and less shot anyways. 

They should have had a Russian official in the stands!  This is how the USSR won the basketball gold in 1972.  Of course they had three attempts at it.  Biggest cheat in Olympic history.

 

http://basketball.about.com/od/internationalbasketball/a/Basketball-At-The-1972-Olympics.htm

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

That's the rule. If you possess the ball with 0.3 seconds or less on the clock, then you can not attempt the shot. I think its absurd. I believe sports science did a bit on this once. They got one of the best 3 point shooters in the NBA to practice shooting. He was able to make a shot in like 0.15 seconds or something. It was absurd. He basically started his shooting motion just before he caught the ball. Anticipating the pass. 

 

Yea the rule is broken. Like I said, NCAA is being lazy. They rather assume it is impossible, then they get smacked down again because they are idiots. At least the NBA moved it to 0.2 seconds or less, a bit more reasonable. I just say go to a video review if that is the situation. 

post #5 of 12

That's a ridiculous rule. I'd never heard of it before today.  

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 

That's the rule. If you possess the ball with 0.3 seconds or less on the clock, then you can not attempt the shot. I think its absurd. I believe sports science did a bit on this once. They got one of the best 3 point shooters in the NBA to practice shooting. He was able to make a shot in like 0.15 seconds or something. It was absurd. He basically started his shooting motion just before he caught the ball. Anticipating the pass.

 

Yea the rule is broken. Like I said, NCAA is being lazy. They rather assume it is impossible, then they get smacked down again because they are idiots. At least the NBA moved it to 0.2 seconds or less, a bit more reasonable. I just say go to a video review if that is the situation.

Yeah, but you are failing to see the other side of the story.  If they don't have a rule like this then they open the door for a slow clock operator to allow shots that shouldn't happen.  You're saying that this is stupid because a guy held the ball for perhaps 0.2 seconds and got his shot discounted unfairly.  And you are right.  But wouldn't it be equally as bad if the guy held onto it for 0.4 seconds and got his shot counted unfairly?

 

The rule - excuse me, the idea behind the rule - kind of makes sense ... or at least I get what they're trying to do.  If it's not humanly possible for somebody to perform a certain act, let's not leave it in the hands of somebody who could screw it up.  Now, based on what you said, it sounds like the rule may need tweaking to 0.2 seconds ... but it doesn't bother me as much as you guys.

 

Is Derek Fisher (and his famous 0.4 second turnaround) the cause of all of this? LOL ;)

post #7 of 12

Why even allow the throw-in to begin with?

 

And good post @Golfingdad.

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

Why even allow the throw-in to begin with?

 

And good post @Golfingdad.

Thanks! ;)  I guess the idea is that even though it's a remote possibility, you can still "tip" the ball into the basket.  Sounds like they may need to go to volleyball referee school and get learned on what is and what isn't a proper set.  A good set = tip in, and a bad set = possess, or something to that effect.

 

This is all fascinating to me because like all of you, I didn't know this rule existed prior to this afternoon.  I'm just glad the first time I learn of it isn't when a team of mine is losing a NCAA tournament game because of it. ;)

post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 

I can see how that can happen, but I don't like taking away an amazing play when everything went correctly. The shot clock guy was on the mark. The throw was on the mark, the shot was in time. I don't like that sort of penalization. 

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 

I can see how that can happen, but I don't like taking away an amazing play when everything went correctly. The shot clock guy was on the mark. The throw was on the mark, the shot was in time. I don't like that sort of penalization. 

 

I agree. It appears that the shot was made in less than 0.3 seconds, which is the amount of time on the clock. With the replay capabilities that we have, I don't see the need for such a rule in the first place. 

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 

I can see how that can happen, but I don't like taking away an amazing play when everything went correctly. The shot clock guy was on the mark. The throw was on the mark, the shot was in time. I don't like that sort of penalization.

And I'm fine with all of that.  I think they need to look harder at exactly what number should be their "drop dead" number then ... not so much the actual rule.  If the NBA has it at 0.2, then perhaps they should follow suit.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by geauxforbroke View Post
 

I agree. It appears that the shot was made in less than 0.3 seconds, which is the amount of time on the clock. With the replay capabilities that we have, I don't see the need for such a rule in the first place.

But replay doesn't show the clock operators hands.  I'm assuming that's the reason for this rule.  If he's slow, either by being a "homer" or by being simply being old, then that is still not accounted for in video replays.  Here's an idea:

 

Adjust the court lights, including the red ring around the backboard such that they are always ON when the clock is stopped.  This way in a situation like this at the end of the game, not only can we see clearly when the guy let go of the ball in relation to the red lights coming off, but we could also see when the lights go off in relation to his catching the ball.  If they had something like that, then I could see this rule being completely unnecessary.

 

Now I think maybe I'm overthinking this. ;)

post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by geauxforbroke View Post
 

I agree. It appears that the shot was made in less than 0.3 seconds, which is the amount of time on the clock. With the replay capabilities that we have, I don't see the need for such a rule in the first place.

But replay doesn't show the clock operators hands.  I'm assuming that's the reason for this rule.  If he's slow, either by being a "homer" or by being simply being old, then that is still not accounted for in video replays.  Here's an idea:

 

Adjust the court lights, including the red ring around the backboard such that they are always ON when the clock is stopped.  This way in a situation like this at the end of the game, not only can we see clearly when the guy let go of the ball in relation to the red lights coming off, but we could also see when the lights go off in relation to his catching the ball.  If they had something like that, then I could see this rule being completely unnecessary.

 

Now I think maybe I'm overthinking this. ;)

 

I don't think you worry about when the clock started. If you know what speed the playback is, it's pretty easy to sync a computer up to it to measure the time between when the player touches the ball and releases it. It seems like a lot of work, but if the game is on the line, I think teams deserve a fair shake.

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