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  1. 1. Do you always walk, get a cart, or both

    • I am a walker
      67
    • Give me a cart
      17
    • I enjoy both
      44


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Golf as an endurance sport, please. The actual time spent swinging a club is just a few minutes and the walking part isn't even moderately strenuous. I wear a pedometer every day and I take more steps walking around doing my day to day business than I do on the course. Riding is more about saving time than anything. Though for it to work the course has to be open enough to maintain the pace riding affords.

That said there are some courses around here where walking would slow the pace to a crawl because the distance between tee boxes is extreme. I don't think I've ever seen anyone walking Buffalo Run in CO. Same with some of the mountain courses here. It really doesn't work.

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I always walk. If I play in a charity event, where carts are required, then I tell my partner that I prefer to walk, and let him or her drive the cart around. My preference for walking is based on t

It's been discussed in other threads, but for those who haven't heard the point of view before: It's not a given that walking is slower - depending on the course it's usually faster in fact, for sever

The downside to your method is that it tends to be a slower pace of play than if you walked all the way.  All that walking back and forth is a real time waster, and can actually add up to as much dist

Originally Posted by Dave2512

Golf as an endurance sport, please. The actual time spent swinging a club is just a few minutes and the walking part isn't even moderately strenuous. I wear a pedometer every day and I take more steps walking around doing my day to day business than I do on the course. Riding is more about saving time than anything. Though for it to work the course has to be open enough to maintain the pace riding affords.

That said there are some courses around here where walking would slow the pace to a crawl because the distance between tee boxes is extreme. I don't think I've ever seen anyone walking Buffalo Run in CO. Same with some of the mountain courses here. It really doesn't work.

Do you walk when you play? If you walk more at work than during an 18 hole round, and don't find walking to be even moderately strenuous, then you are in better shape than the average North American golfer (apparently). Kudos!!

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Originally Posted by Dave2512

Golf as an endurance sport, please. The actual time spent swinging a club is just a few minutes and the walking part isn't even moderately strenuous. I wear a pedometer every day and I take more steps walking around doing my day to day business than I do on the course. Riding is more about saving time than anything. Though for it to work the course has to be open enough to maintain the pace riding affords.

That said there are some courses around here where walking would slow the pace to a crawl because the distance between tee boxes is extreme. I don't think I've ever seen anyone walking Buffalo Run in CO. Same with some of the mountain courses here. It really doesn't work.

Hey Dave, I bet if you told Ken Venturi that golf isn't an endurance sport he would have words with you. If you get a chance check out his 1964 win at Congressional. It was a 36-hole final in 100 degree heat. Venturi won it suffering heat stroke and dehydration. But really though no-one here is trying to convince anyone else that golf is an endurance sport. However, take the walking component out and you have no "sport" at all. Perhaps an athletic game but not a sport per se. That is my only point. Choose to walk or ride makes no difference to me, just don't call it a sport if you ride. But you make a good point, the addition of golf carts to the game has changed golf course design. Long distance from green to tee is not a good one for walking but on the good side it has opened up lots of interesting hilly terrain that would otherwise be unreachable without the cart. I just wish more courses in the US that are walkable would allow players to walk like they do in the rest of the golfing world.

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Originally Posted by JohnLund

Go ahead and ride I don't give a poop. However, don't call what you do a "sport" cuz it ain't. Yes, it is a game, the best one in fact. I am not saying I am better than those who don't walk I was merely defining what can be called sport. And yes, I do belief that golf is a purer form of sport when you walk it as it was designed to be played. I don't think you will change that by calling it bunk because that is your feeling. It is a fact. I am 67, have arthritis in my right foot (old football injury), and will walk until I can't then I will ride. I guess I wanted to open this thread up cuz I am headed south again to the California's Coachella Valley where it is difficult to find good affordable walking courses. I say that because I walk all summer up north and am fit, strong legs etc. and then lose that over the winter cuz they make me ride a GD cart everywhere including great courses like the Classic Club, Desert Willow, Eagle Falls, and so many others that could be walked easily enough but don't let you. It is a beautiful game and yes I know the rules better than most thank you. Enjoy the game...walking or riding...your choice.

You say you don't give a "Poop", yet everyone of your posts say that those who choose to ride are not playing the same game as you. Fourputt had it right, whether a person walks or rides, as long as they are playing by the rules, they're both playing the same game, by the same rules, with the same goals.

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Oh for goodness sakes, once again, it is the same "game" but is not a "sport" if you don't walk. The only thing going on here is my feeble attempt to put a definition on the difference. I really don't care if you ride or walk while you play the game, I will take your money either way.

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Originally Posted by JohnLund

Oh for goodness sakes, once again, it is the same "game" but is not a "sport" if you don't walk. The only thing going on here is my feeble attempt to put a definition on the difference. I really don't care if you ride or walk while you play the game, I will take your money either way.

You'll do that exactly how?

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Originally Posted by JohnLund

Quote:

Originally Posted by sean_miller

You'll do that exactly how?

One stroke at a time.

Problem is you'll be standing over your third before we reach my drive - lol - keep on truckin'!

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7000 yards is about 4 miles. It doesn't take much effort to walk 4 miles if you're stopping at least 72 times. That's about 7000-8000 steps depending on a person's stride. Most people accomplish that daily doing things like going to the grocery store, walking to and from the car, bathroom visits, doing household chores etc.

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Originally Posted by Dave2512

7000 yards is about 4 miles. It doesn't take much effort to walk 4 miles if you're stopping at least 72 times. That's about 7000-8000 steps depending on a person's stride. Most people accomplish that daily doing things like going to the grocery store, walking to and from the car, bathroom visits, doing household chores etc.

You never answered the question of whether you walk and carry, walk and push, or ride. Or at least I missed it. Do you find that 18 holes of walking and carrying is similar to routine household chores? If you do, my point was you are above average fitnesswise compared to a lot of recreational golfers.

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If it is no big deal then why make carts mandatory on walkable courses? I would suggest that walking that distance 3 or 4 times a week vs riding the course, to the store, to work, or wherever, puts you in a much healthy state of being than riding everywhere. No? One of the things I don't like to see is the number of young guys, twenty somethings, riding. And then another question comes to mind. Why do you see so many overweight folks riding when they could be walking to knock off the extra weight? Last year I attended the Humana Challenge in LaQuinta. Former president Bill Clinton was there. I loved the simple message he delivered in conjunction with the Humana Foundation. Regarding fitness, he said, "Move more; Eat less." North Americans are facing an obesity epidemic. Whatever we can do to encourage fitness will help us all in the future. I have no cross to bear here but I do believe in staying fit for myself and if I can encourage others along the way...so be it. Cheers.

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So is sitting in a chair an endurance sport also? After all if you spend 8 hours sitting in 100 degree weather without drinking and no shade, you have a good chance of having heat stroke and dehydration also.   Ken suffered on the course due to stupidity (i.e. not drinking. Granted they didn't know much about sports nutrition back then) not because of the difficulty of walking a course.  And of course it should be pointed out that pretty much zero pros every carry their own clubs.

If walking a couple of miles gets you in shape, more power to you. But I would reconsider my fitness program if that is the case. FWIW I do both. I walk because it saves me 10 bucks and on a slow day, it doesn't effect my pace of play. I ride when the course is empty as I can play much faster and find 30mins in the gym a much better workout than strolling around.

Quote:

Hey Dave, I bet if you told Ken Venturi that golf isn't an endurance sport he would have words with you. If you get a chance check out his 1964 win at Congressional. It was a 36-hole final in 100 degree heat. Venturi won it suffering heat stroke and dehydration. But really though no-one here is trying to convince anyone else that golf is an endurance sport. However, take the walking component out and you have no "sport" at all. Perhaps an athletic game but not a sport per se. That is my only point. Choose to walk or ride makes no difference to me, just don't call it a sport if you ride. But you make a good point, the addition of golf carts to the game has changed golf course design. Long distance from green to tee is not a good one for walking but on the good side it has opened up lots of interesting hilly terrain that would otherwise be unreachable without the cart. I just wish more courses in the US that are walkable would allow players to walk like they do in the rest of the golfing world.

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Originally Posted by sean_miller

You never answered the question of whether you walk and carry, walk and push, or ride. Or at least I missed it. Do you find that 18 holes of walking and carrying is similar to routine household chores? If you do, my point was you are above average fitnesswise compared to a lot of recreational golfers.

I can do better than that, like I said I wear a pedometer. I walk and ride, depends on what time of day, how much time I have and whether or not I am paired with a walker. It's pointless to sit in a cart and wait for a walker, saves no time. When I ride I take about 2500-3000 steps per 9 holes, walking about 3000-4000. How straight I hit the ball plays a part when walking. With a cart I have to stay on the path around the greens and tee boxes, which requires walking in areas of the course a walker doesn't face. Their line through the course is more direct. Especially on holes where the course has signage for "path only". They walk directly to their ball. I park, get out and walk back and forth. Repeating that as many times as it takes to finish the hole. In many instances the distance is equal or close to it according to my pedometer.

But yeah I am in above average condition. Today I rode 11 miles on the spin bike before lifting weights followed by hitting 120 golf balls in my basement "range". After that I rolled putts for 15 minutes on my BirdieBall green. I ride my bike 3.7 miles to work, one way, and home again for lunch to pick up my car, because my clubs are in the trunk . I walk a lot during the day, around 14000-20000 steps per day. Work breaks, golf included, and the previously stated daily stuff. Later I'll hit 120 balls again before I spin for 20 minutes then I'll call it a day. No course time planned today. That is a pretty typical day for me. The exception would be Sun, I don't lift or walk extra miles on Sun. Just golf stuff and spin bike. Golf, walking or riding, burns the least calories of any of my activities and no I don't find it strenuous on the course. At 43, nearly 44, I stay as active as possible but I'm certainly not an elite athlete or anything. I work at it enough to enjoy life and gourmandise without guilt.

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Originally Posted by Dave2512

I can do better than that, like I said I wear a pedometer. I walk and ride, depends on what time of day, how much time I have and whether or not I am paired with a walker. It's pointless to sit in a cart and wait for a walker, saves no time. When I ride I take about 2500-3000 steps per 9 holes, walking about 3000-4000. How straight I hit the ball plays a part when walking. With a cart I have to stay on the path around the greens and tee boxes, which requires walking in areas of the course a walker doesn't face. Their line through the course is more direct. Especially on holes where the course has signage for "path only". They walk directly to their ball. I park, get out and walk back and forth. Repeating that as many times as it takes to finish the hole. In many instances the distance is equal or close to it according to my pedometer.

But yeah I am in above average condition. Today I rode 11 miles on the spin bike before lifting weights followed by hitting 120 golf balls in my basement "range". After that I rolled putts for 15 minutes on my BirdieBall green. I ride my bike 3.7 miles to work, one way, and home again for lunch to pick up my car, because my clubs are in the trunk . I walk a lot during the day, around 14000-20000 steps per day. Work breaks, golf included, and the previously stated daily stuff. Later I'll hit 120 balls again before I spin for 20 minutes then I'll call it a day. No course time planned today. That is a pretty typical day for me. The exception would be Sun, I don't lift or walk extra miles on Sun. Just golf stuff and spin bike. Golf, walking or riding, burns the least calories of any of my activities and no I don't find it strenuous on the course. At 43, nearly 44, I stay as active as possible but I'm certainly not an elite athlete or anything. I work at it enough to enjoy life and gourmandise without guilt.

Whoa! Good job Dave. I like the sound of that regimen. If the average citizen did half that we wouldn't be having an obesity epidemic.

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Originally Posted by JohnLund

Whoa! Good job Dave. I like the sound of that regimen. If the average citizen did half that we wouldn't be having an obesity epidemic.

It's not as impressive as it looks. Takes about 2.5-3 hours a day in increments. I am fortunate that my work allows 45-50 minutes a day walking. The actual workout is about 45 minutes in the AM and 20-30 minutes at night. I bike, walk and hit the balls for fun and relaxation as much as anything. The time to get to work on the bike and in the car is just a few minutes difference with stop lights and all that. I'm a path and side roads guy. Well that and it allows extra calories for beer, wine and food.

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Originally Posted by x129

So is sitting in a chair an endurance sport also? After all if you spend 8 hours sitting in 100 degree weather without drinking and no shade, you have a good chance of having heat stroke and dehydration also.   Ken suffered on the course due to stupidity (i.e. not drinking. Granted they didn't know much about sports nutrition back then) not because of the difficulty of walking a course.  And of course it should be pointed out that pretty much zero pros every carry their own clubs.

If walking a couple of miles gets you in shape, more power to you. But I would reconsider my fitness program if that is the case. FWIW I do both. I walk because it saves me 10 bucks and on a slow day, it doesn't effect my pace of play. I ride when the course is empty as I can play much faster and find 30mins in the gym a much better workout than strolling around.

Quote:

Agreed. Golf is not an endurance sport but as I mentioned, I think Ken made it that on that occasion. I actually talked to Ken at a clinic he was giving in Palm Desert last year. He admitted that they didn't realize the importance of hydration back then. Glad to hear you keep up your fitness routine. That's what I have always found. It takes more than actually playing golf to stay fit. Some strength work plus cardio plus flexibility exercise will allow you to play better and longer and feel better in all things.

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Our course does not allow walking before 11:00 on weekends from April-November.I play a lot during the week,and walk. Sometimes I carry, sometimes I push.I prefer to play early on the weekends, so I ride when I have to.I don't care if golf is considered a sport or a game, I just play because it's fun.

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