Jump to content
IGNORED

taking a huge leap of faith re Golf dream


freddy
 Share

Note: This thread is 4177 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

Recommended Posts

I'm brand new to the forum and am sure that many people have posted something similar to this but I feel that I'm in a unique situation and want people's thoughts.

I am currently a 26 year old lawyer, but have stumbled upon an opportunity to attempt to devote myself full time to golf for a period of several years in order to try to play professionally.

I took up the game at 10, teaching myself to play by reading Golf magazine and broke par on a 6200 yard course when I was 14. However, I was a nationally ranked tennis player and devoted my efforts to that, eventually gaining a scholarship to play D1 tennis. Throughout this time I played golf very sparingly - I would guess that I have averaged 10 rounds a year over the last ten years. I haven't practiced since I was 14.

I burned out playing tennis, as I never really loved the sport, but have always loved my time on the golf course. Although I play so sparingly, I would guess that I play to about a 1 handicap. My game has actually steadily improved as I have gotten older. At my parent's country club that was ranked one of the most difficult courses in the country by Golf Digest, I routinely shoot 73, 74, and 75. Recently, US open qualifying was held there and the winner who qualified for the open finished with a 2 day score of -2.

Without getting into specifics, I am now in a position that I can take several years to work only on my golf game - I would not have any other job. If I don't think I have what it takes after a few years, I have connections to fall back on.

Sorry for the extremely long post, but based on this limited amount of information, is what I am doing completely and utterly foolish? I realize the almost impossible odds of becoming a professional golfer when I am already 26, but I feel that I have such a unique knack for the game given my utter lack of practice that I should give it a try.

What say you all?
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Wow man...sounds like you have a lot of natural talent. You only live once so live your dream to the fullest I say. Life is not about money it's about truly being happy. Good luck with whatever you choose!
Link to comment
Share on other sites


That is amazing. If you go for it GOOD LUCK, and best wishes...

... However, not to be the guy to bring the bad news, but I know multiple people who are +3 handicaps, and they are still sttuck on the mini-tours, trying to get on the Nationwide Tour. It is very competitive out there, and unless you can truly go around most course at 67 or 68, your chances are really slim.

My only point is do what you want, if it is your dream then so be it, but don't "throw away" what you have on dreams of making it with a 2 handicap.

Good luck in whatever decision you make!




Quick edit: Someone on this forum said it best IMO: In its most simple form, to go pro, you must be able to go to 10 courses you have never played ( tough courses ) and shoot in the 60's to make it on tour. Just keep that in mind when making your decision.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


You're youngish and seemingly unattached, you have your education out of the way and you are already in a stable job that you can apparently go back to. If it's your dream, you have this mysterious opportunity to do nothing but work on golf for a few years without hurting yourself too badly career-wise, and you either won't be hurting your family or don't have one, then it doesn't seem like a huge leap of faith. It seems like kind of a no-brainer. Now is probably the best time to do this.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


If I were in your shoes, I would set out a plan, not just take time to see if it happens. You are a 1 HC right now. I agree with the above posts about how good you must be to play professionally. Give yourself 6 months to reach a goal, say a +1.5 or +2 HC. I know that seems like some quick improvement, but you probably need to be taking one stroke off your HC every 4-6 months if you have any hope of going pro, at least initially. And, take into account that the more you improve, the more difficult it will be to get better. So if it takes X amount of time to get down to a +2, it will probably take you 2-3X to get down to a +4. Time is not on your side. If you don't meet your 6-month and one-year goals, I would recommend that you return to practicing law and try your best to excel on the amateur circuit.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Plenty of people reading your post and shaking their head. But I say why not? Go for it and enjoy the journey. Having to fall back to being a lawyer, worse things in life.

first, I will admit my jealousy. The fact that you have a law degree and enough money set aside to quit and focus on golf full time is awesome, I wish you the best of luck.

I will suggest you go out and read Paper Tiger by Tim Coyne. It is an excellent book, he was a person who started at a 16 handicap and devoted his life to it, and wrote a book about it when he was done. It really will open your eyes to what all is involved. http://www.tomcoyne.com/Partners.html
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Here's my opinion and advice or a suggestion, ultimately the decision is up to you, so call me your uncle and put me in your Will and read on ... ;)

First, sit down and wrtie out your Cumulae Vitae (sp?) or Resume but do it from a two/three year ahead perspective, but write it now with your recent career experiences still fresh in your mind. Write it in such a way that you could present it to the Partners of some big Firm if you do come back to the profession. Keep in mind who your audience will be a few years from now. Write it as if you are taking a Sabattical (sp?) to refocus your mind and investigate or research new legal opportunities while at the same time taking time to dedicate effort to your golf game to see if you could make the Pro Tour without making that a major distraction to your now current career. If you tried to qualify for the Pro Tour while maintaining your current workload your work would suffer and ethically (yes, I said ethically) you would not want to jeopardize your current career with outside distractions. Pro Golf is a full time endeavor, as is a Law Practice.

Hopefully preparing this now will make you the envy of the Law Partners in a few years. I can see you being introduced as the guy who took a shot and was smart and conscentious (sp?) enough to know to take a sabatical from law while doing so. I can also see you becoming the firms secret weapon in many inter-firm golf wagers.

And if you do make it on the tour you can probably parlay that into a little legal side work.

I'll get you started:

"In 2010 I decided to take a short sabatical from the legal profession after achieving some significant level of success within the legal profession. I decided to do some field research in professional sports and chose to use golf as my avenue of approach since I was also fairly accomplished as a golfer. ...."

Edit as necessary and correct grammer and spelling as needed. I wish you good luck and good success however it all turns out.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


That is amazing. If you go for it GOOD LUCK, and best wishes...

Good point here at the end, BUT sounds like he's not taking into consideration that you've barely been playing for the past 10 years, so with treating it as a full time gig, your handicap should drop quite a bit to where you ARE shooting in the upper 60's I would think. GO FOR IT!
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Go for it! Somebody has to fill those spots on the tour, it might as well be you. One thing that concerns me is that you're asking a bunch of strangers whether you should do it or not. I would think an endeavor like this would have to be a drive, a mission, a focused goal, and the opinions of a bunch golfers on the internet should be irrelevant to you.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Agreed on it having to be a mission that consumes my life. I suppose my real question is whether my natural ability as evidenced by scratch play without practice gives me a shot at making it given my competition: accomplished college and foreign players who have been winning in competitive settings their entire lives.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


So, you have financial backing to supplement your current occupation, correct? What about the additional costs for greens fees, tournament entries, travel, swing coach(s), equipment, etc…?

Your chances are slim to none that you will ever make a dime playing professionally………but, to quote the classic Dumb and Dumber:

Lloyd : What do you think the chances are of a guy like you and a girl like me... ending up together?
Mary : Well, Lloyd, that's difficult to say. I mean, we don't really...
Lloyd : Hit me with it! Just give it to me straight! I came a long way just to see you, Mary. The least you can do is level with me. What are my chances?
Mary : Not good.
Lloyd : You mean, not good like one out of a hundred?
Mary : I'd say more like one out of a million.
[pause]
Lloyd : So you're telling me there's a chance... *YEAH!*



So what do you have to lose (except 3 years in corporate America and a jumpstart on retirement and possibly a job being available to a 29 yr old lawyer with no experience)?
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Man, look at it this way, if you try and can't make it as a pro but the "fall back" plan is truly secure, what's the worst that can happen, you walk into a room after going back into law and a guy looks down at ya and says, "Hmmp, that guy tried to play pro golf for a few years!" Yeah, most will think wow, he gave it a shot. I think the key here is you ALREADY have your law degree. If this was pre-college, most wil tell ya you're crazy. Given the limited information, I'd say you'd be crazy not to do it. As a final vote of conficence. Go find the BEST pro teacher within 100 miles of ya and set up a lesson. While there, give him the run down and just see what a more educated opinion is!!
Link to comment
Share on other sites


I have financial backing and a job (fiance's family connections) waiting for me if I fail. I completely understand for an ordinary person it is less than a one in a million chance. But don't you think that it is one out of a million that can play scratch golf without practice?
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Agreed on it having to be a mission that consumes my life. I suppose my real question is whether my natural ability as evidenced by scratch play without practice gives me a shot at making it given my competition: accomplished college and foreign players who have been winning in competitive settings their entire lives.

I hear ya. Like my boss used to say, "you can't polish a turd". So, that fact that you're a scratch from the get-go is a good sign. But I think there are a lot of very good athletes involved in the golf biz that are working the trenches, teaching or working in the clubhouse, so that by itself is not the determining factor.

Ian Poulter is an example. At one time he was a assistant pro and shop manager. Look at him now. The fact he was pumping hacks through the course and now he's a champ and contending for majors speaks a lot to the amount of talent that's out there. So, to answer your question, no, it's not just natural ability. IMO, it's also just as important to have the mental part and some luck. But again, I'm just some schmuck sitting at a computer waiting for the sun to come out so I can go pound balls, so what the hell do I know. Like I said, it has to be someone, why not you .
Link to comment
Share on other sites


But don't you think that it is one out of a million that can play scratch golf without practice?

No. I think it is very unusual, but there are folks like yourself with natural athletic talent that can learn how to make a nice golf swing and have the confidence to make pretty good shots when necessary w/o seizing up (again, natural athletic talent). Couple that with good course management and you have a scratch golfer.

That is still a world away from the kind of play at the pro level.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Note: This thread is 4177 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • Support TST Affiliates

    TourStriker PlaneMate
    Golfer's Journal
    Whoop
    SuperSpeed
    FlightScope Mevo
    Use the code "iacas" for 10% off Mevo and the code "iacasjun21" for 10% off SuperSpeed.
  • Posts

    • Trip to Oregon was no good, hit the driver terrible so I was basically scrambling every hole. Slowly working my way through my left misses off the tee. Mostly mechanics but also part mental with trusting it on the course. Can't reproduce the miss on the range. Finished one shot out of playoff for US Mid Am and US FourBall qualifiers.  Got a decent lead in our points race. Noticed that as I've been trying to improve rib cage and hip depth that the right ankle and foot would get unstable. Asked my trainer/pt about it and this is what he recommended. He just got certified in a foot program. Fingers crossed but for the first time I can really feel myself winding up the upper torso over a solid lower body. But doing it athletically not just faking it by not moving stuff around. It's the most rib cage rotation I've had going back without trying to force it. I like that I’m doing more work at the joint and that the joint is inside my right ankle at 4. I think the key for me with this foot tripod thing is to keep the right knee over the foot, not letting it rotate towards the middle of my stance. I can feel the "spiraling" effect. I have high arches and when I go into my backswing the foot supinates incorrectly losing the big toe joint contact. Ideally you would want to "build" more of an arch of the foot on the backswing and use that "ramp" on the downswing. This would be another way of explaining it. If the arch of the foot collapses then you basically lose access to the deep front line.  
    • Day 211.  Played 18 today, and really came to life in the second nine.  3 pars, bogey, 3 pars, closed out with two bogeys.   Shot a 39 for the second nine, something I'm not sure I've done at that course before (Hansen Dam).  I've had days where I hit a bunch of GIRs on that second nine, one day it was 7 GIR + 2 near, but I think I shot 40 or 41 on the second nine that day. 
    • And Chamblee said Poulter is the worst ball striker "By a lot" of all the players and Poulter won his singles match by 3 holes LOL...   Best result of the European players and most of the USA players, guess that's what you call an anomaly. Unbelievable how stupid that statement was, the Postman did himself proud....
    • “So who talks first? You talk first? I talk first?” The Force Awakens  
    • I think I’m playing my wedges too far forward in my stance. That could explain the occasional fat shots and why I tend to hit the ball high off the face out of the rough.
  • Today's Birthdays

    1. bandstan
      bandstan
      (51 years old)
    2. boobiemiles
      boobiemiles
      (30 years old)
    3. ButterCuts1372
      ButterCuts1372
      (36 years old)
    4. Dombaker
      Dombaker
      (25 years old)

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...