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Mattplusness

Longest lasting grips

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I will be getting my clubs lengthened within two weeks and I am wondering what grips are the most long lasting (quality) brand? I have a friend who had his re-gripped with golf pride because he heard they had lasting qualities, but what are your opinions?
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I have some Lamkin PermaWraps on mine and they seem to last no problem... also are very cheap. I've also heard great things about PURE grips, I believe they have a 1 yr warranty on theirs.
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When getting grips, don't just get the longest lasting. If you play in the rain from time to time, you want grips that don't lose grip when wet. Feel is important as well, some grips are too soft or too hard. Go to a shop and check them out. Can't really go wrong with GolfPride Tour Velvets.
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When getting grips, don't just get the longest lasting. If you play in the rain from time to time, you want grips that don't lose grip when wet. Feel is important as well, some grips are too soft or too hard. Go to a shop and check them out. Can't really go wrong with GolfPride Tour Velvets.

On a note of grip wetness...here in Western Washington, our clubs (and grips) get wet regularly. I'm a firm believer in corded (or half corded) grips. I've got Golf Pride new decade multi-compound grips on all my wedges (clubs that get set down in the grass) and I use the hell out of them and haven't seen any notable degradation after almost a year. I like the GP tour velvet, but they get slick when they are wet. I've heard lamkin makes a nice grip as well.

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Pure grips review

Source: The review
Golf grips with a one-year guarantee and no tape or solvent required? Sound like hocum? It's not.

Suffice to say I think PURE is safe in guaranteeing their year-long playability. With my normal grips (Lamkin Crosslines or Golf Pride New Decade Multicompounds), a single heavy practice session could show appreciable wear on my grips. I saw none with the PURE Pro. I've worked with a student who has the PURE Smooth Wraps installed. He hit about 300 golf balls per day in all sorts of weather for two months and his grips look virtually new.

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On a note of grip wetness...here in Western Washington, our clubs (and grips) get wet regularly. I'm a firm believer in corded (or half corded) grips. I've got Golf Pride new decade multi-compound grips on all my wedges (clubs that get set down in the grass) and I use the hell out of them and haven't seen any notable degradation after almost a year. I like the GP tour velvet, but they get slick when they are wet. I've heard lamkin makes a nice grip as well.

I have no problem with my tour velvets in the rain. The NDMC grips are a bit harsh if you don't have a soft grip so I usually don't recommend them to most people.

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I have no problem with my tour velvets in the rain. The NDMC grips are a bit harsh if you don't have a soft grip so I usually don't recommend them to most people.

I go to Lampkin full cord..this year I got GP NDMC's and here in FLA with the humidity I think they are slippery. My son on the other hand agrees with u, he hates the Lampkins as they tear up his hands.

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Try the Golf pride Tour Wrap 2G...............I have slight arthritis with my Cadet medium fingers so i switched from the standard GP new Decade to the Midsize Tour Wrap 2G.....they are just slightly larger so I don't have to squeeze as hard and they also absorb more ground shock.

They are 1/2 price as compared to the GP new Decades.
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I use Lamkin Torsion Control grips. I love them they seem to be holding up very well and have played a few rounds in light rain have never had an issue.
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On a note of grip wetness...here in Western Washington, our clubs (and grips) get wet regularly. I'm a firm believer in corded (or half corded) grips. I've got Golf Pride new decade multi-compound grips on all my wedges (clubs that get set down in the grass) and I use the hell out of them and haven't seen any notable degradation after almost a year. I like the GP tour velvet, but they get slick when they are wet. I've heard lamkin makes a nice grip as well.

western washington here as well. i switched all my clubs to NDMCs this year and still loving them but I have started noticing some wear on the bottom half (noncorded) part of the grip. I'm not erally a big fan of standard tour velvets, but previously I used full cord with great success as well.

As for durability and long lasting goes, I don't think anyone can argue that full corded grips WILL last the longest...but they are also harsh on your hands. Grips such as the tour wrap 2G's, while nice and tacky, one season of using those and they'll probably shred apart. I have a friend who switched all his grips over to the 2G's and he loves them but when his hands start to sweat, they can get a bit slipper, thus having to towell off his grips after each shot. for now, I'm sticking with the NDMC's. I've found that even when my hands get sweaty, they still provide the grip I need, better so than tour velvets.
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the wraps always last the longest with the winns or tour velvets wearing quickly. Try tacki mac wraps or lamkin wraps...last forever. Have some that are 10 years old.
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I tend to disagree with the lamkin grips. I just regripped three of my clubs with the standard model and after a week the tackiness is gone in all three grips. Keep having to wipe them down with the grip cleaner to bring back some of the tackiness back. I thought the first one was defective but it happened to each of the ones that were regripped.

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I've never had a problem with Golf Pride Tour Velvet and Lamkin Crossline. I currently have Crosslines on my irons and they have lasted over 60 rounds and many practice sessions. Just maintain them and they last a long time.

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I have almost 2 years, about 150 rounds of golf plus another 75 or so range trips on my Lamkin Crosslines.  They are just now beginning to show any wear on them.   I've played in rain, and temps ranging from 100* down to the mid-30's.   I haven't had any problem keeping a good grip on the club under any of those conditions.   I like the looks of the NDMC's but am not sure whether it would be wise to mess with what I know works.....

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LongEST? I don't know. Long? My Iomic Sticky 2.3's are 2.5 seasons old and look and feel new. Over 100 rounds and many many sessions on the range. I don't wear a glove and would notice any changes in feel. So far, none. If you buy Iomic Sticky 2.3's, pick your color carefully because you'll have them for a long time. :)

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Any grip with cord in it will not slip in the rain, although the rough texture will not appeal to some. If I don't have cord and know that the conditions will be wet, I always use my rain gloves - a good compromise.

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The original Tour Wraps from Golf Pride were fantastic. I heard that the formula had changed because they were too durable and you could easily get 2 years out of them. I switched to the 2Gs and noticed that they wore so much quicker. Since then I went to the Lamkin REL 3Gen after they sent me a set to review. After 25 rounds they had minimal wear. I switched to the Golf Pride New Decade for another review and quickly went back to the 3Gens. I found the 3Gen to be the best blend of performance, playability, and affordability.

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