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Grip Installation Gurus - Need Help…

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I've recently installed 7 or 8 grips on everything from a drivers, to irons to hybrids.      I've viewed all the youtube vid's about how to do it (have a vice with the rubber inserts, grip tape & mineral spirits / acetone ... only two of them have gone on easy.     The others have been rediculously brutal - the fit is so tight it gets to a point that I just cant get the grips on no matter what I do (I'm not a weak guy).     The only way I could complete the grip install was to fill up my wife's spagetti pot with water, wait a half hour for it to boil and then heat the grip to a high temperature to soften them up.

It's really a PIA.     I've installed Winn, Golf Pride & Lamkin grips - nothing unusual ... seems it shouldn't be this hard to do.

Just curious if there's any trade secrets to getting the grips to just slide right on like you see in the video's ?      I've got a dozen oversize Lamskin's (LOVE that grip) to install & I'm dreading it... thx

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My quick thought is that you are not using enough grip solvent. I know some people use Mineral Spirits, but have always had better luck with true grip solvent. They slip right on without issue.

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As Wet Doggg mentioned, it's probably solvent related.     In addition to pouring solvent onto the shaft & grip tape, do you also put some in the grip?    I've found best results if I hold my finger over the little vent hole at the butt end of the grip, pour a little solvent into the grip, cap the other end with a finger and then shake it around to get the inside of the grip nice and coated.    I then pour out the solvent from inside the grip onto the shaft to wet the tape, and slide it right on.

One other thing that will make it tough is if you don't fold the grip tape into the butt end of the shaft a little.   Most instruction say to leave a 1/2 inch or so of tape past the butt end and then fold it into the end of the shaft.   Once wetted this helps the grip slide on more easily as the rough metal edge of the shaft isn't trying to cut into the inside of the grip rubber as you slide it on.

By the way, you mention that you've tried acetone.   I wouldn't recommend it as a grip solvent as it will actually eat into many rubber compounds a bit, and also if you spill some on the ferrules on the club it will attack the plastic.

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Try the Golfsmith professional grip solvent.  I think it is great, and it is totally non-offensive to use.  And the tips you received above seem spot on.  I am a novice home gripper, but so far have not had problems using plenty of this Golfsmith solvent inside the grip, then let out over the double sided tape (from Golfsmith also), and my grips have slid right on.

http://www.golfsmith.com/products/9158/Clubmaker/Professional_Grip_Solvent-Qt

Use code JXT012CVN for 15% off and free shipping.

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I use mineral spirits with no problems whatsoever.  I think the trick is to be generous with whatever solvent you're using.  I use a tin painter's tray to catch the excess solvent for re-use.  As has been mentioned, I pour the solvent into the grip first and then shake it so the inside of the grip is coated.  I then dribble the solvent that's in the grip onto the grip tape that's on the shaft.  I do this through the hole at the butt end of the grip as I find it's easier to control the flow here.  Then, I pinch the "bottom" of the grip so it forms an oval shape and slide it right onto the shaft.  The painter's tray catches any additional excess solvent that the grip pushes off the tape.

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Thanks guys - I think I may not have used enough solvent .... I'll be sure to really flood it on next time !

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Originally Posted by nevets88

Just wondering, Pure Grip folks, how big a compressor do you have at home?


Just a small 2 gallon one, I think. Was something like $80 (normally $110) on sale at Home Depot or Lowe's.

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If you don't want to buy a compressor you can probably use one at a gas station, friend's place or something like that. Once you've done the big job with removing the old grips, tape and glue, installing the new ones is done in a couple of minutes.

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1gallonaircompressor.jpg

I've blown on a bunch of different brands of grips using air.  Just put a set of Golf Pride Tour Velvets on my new irons this weekend.  Takes more time to set the iron up in the vice than it does to install them!  I have a tiny little 1 gallon compressor that is setup inside my bench cabinet and plumbed to the outside.  I got it at a yard sale for $10 (new they are about $50) and it's identical to this one:

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what is this air compressor method ?      Is if for getting old grips off or putting new grips on ?      What kind of fitting do you need ?    Thx

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what is this air compressor method ?      Is if for getting old grips off or putting new grips on ?      What kind of fitting do you need ?    Thx

You can use air pressure to remove old grips, but it may not come loose if the glue is strong enough. The concept is to install new grips with air compressor. I think you can install both new grips with double sided tape on the shaft and without any tape. PURE Grips can be installed without using any tape on the shaft, the grip sticks right to the metal without any glue needed. Here is a demonstration video: http://vimeo.com/12407977 I love the Pure grips and got them on all my clubs. The installation is done in 10 seconds. Once you've installed tapeless grips, removing and installing new ones is done in 12 seconds. Pure sells an installation gun with a tube in the end to keep the grip in place. You can use a normal gun too if you want, I've installed with both, but the Pure gun is easier to use. The longest process if you are changing from taped grips to tapeless is removing the old grip, tape and glue.

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I got an air nozzle from Harbor Freight for $4 (they are on sale right for for $1.17!).  I cut the tip down to about 1" and ground a point back on it, makes it easier to slip into the hole in the grip.  Then I took a 2" PCV pipe cap and drilled a hole that would let the cap fit snuggly onto the tip of the nozzle.  I also cut a piece of 2" PVC pipe that will slip into the cap to use when removing old ones (just in case it is stuck real good and wants to rapidly expand when it does release from the shaft.  Cheap insurance.).

image_1018.jpg

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Originally Posted by Clambake

As Wet Doggg mentioned, it's probably solvent related.     In addition to pouring solvent onto the shaft & grip tape, do you also put some in the grip?    I've found best results if I hold my finger over the little vent hole at the butt end of the grip, pour a little solvent into the grip, cap the other end with a finger and then shake it around to get the inside of the grip nice and coated.    I then pour out the solvent from inside the grip onto the shaft to wet the tape, and slide it right on.

One other thing that will make it tough is if you don't fold the grip tape into the butt end of the shaft a little.   Most instruction say to leave a 1/2 inch or so of tape past the butt end and then fold it into the end of the shaft.   Once wetted this helps the grip slide on more easily as the rough metal edge of the shaft isn't trying to cut into the inside of the grip rubber as you slide it on.

By the way, you mention that you've tried acetone.   I wouldn't recommend it as a grip solvent as it will actually eat into many rubber compounds a bit, and also if you spill some on the ferrules on the club it will attack the plastic.

+1 - exactly how I do it, this was from watching a video and article on Golfsmith website, I think.  I use their solvent, but have used gasoline in a pinch.  It needs to be wet, not just 'moist'.

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Originally Posted by Zeph

Quote:

Originally Posted by inthehole

what is this air compressor method ?      Is if for getting old grips off or putting new grips on ?      What kind of fitting do you need ?    Thx

You can use air pressure to remove old grips, but it may not come loose if the glue is strong enough.

The concept is to install new grips with air compressor. I think you can install both new grips with double sided tape on the shaft and without any tape. PURE Grips can be installed without using any tape on the shaft, the grip sticks right to the metal without any glue needed. Here is a demonstration video: http://vimeo.com/12407977

I love the Pure grips and got them on all my clubs. The installation is done in 10 seconds. Once you've installed tapeless grips, removing and installing new ones is done in 12 seconds. Pure sells an installation gun with a tube in the end to keep the grip in place. You can use a normal gun too if you want, I've installed with both, but the Pure gun is easier to use.

The longest process if you are changing from taped grips to tapeless is removing the old grip, tape and glue.


wow - would never have thought of that.      I have a compressor, and will definitely try that - thx !

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I had the same issue with Golf Galaxy solvent.  I used the compressor method and it went on really fast.  You can use a ball inflator nozzle to screw on the most air guns as Glock showed.

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When you guys use the compressor method do you still put a little grip tape on the end to help seal the end of the shaft or is this unnecessary?

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