• Announcements

    • iacas

      GAME GOLF Ryder Cup Contest   09/22/2016

      Join our GAME GOLF Ryder Cup Challenge to win an autographed GAME GOLF, a Pebble Steel watch, and many more great prizes!
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
newtogolf

Amazingly bad shot - what do rules say?

12 posts in this topic

I hit a horrible drive today with my 3w, a hard worm burning hook that hit the far side of the cart path, flew high (and far) in the air, landed on the previous holes green, slowly rolled right up to the cup, hit the pin and dropped.  My buddies told me to play it as a lost ball (penalty) and hit another off the tee.  I thought I should get to hit the ball dropped just off the green without penalty, but they disagreed.   Were either of us right?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Want to get rid of this advertisement? Sign up (or log in) today! It's free!

You get free relief.

In fact its the only place on the golf course where you must take relief unless there is a local rule in place for sensitive areas.

Rule 25-1b Abnormal Ground Conditions

b. Relief

On the Putting Green : If the ball lies on the putting green , the player must lift the ball and place it, without penalty, at the nearest point of relief that is not in a hazard or, if complete relief is impossible, at the nearest position to where it lay that affords maximum available relief from the condition, but not nearer the hole and not in a hazard . The nearest point of relief or maximum available relief may be off the putting green .

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

The wrong rule has been quoted above but the basic answer is correct.

Wrong Putting Green

A “ wrong putting green ” is any putting green other than that of the hole being played. Unless otherwise prescribed by the Committee , this term includes a practice putting green or pitching green on the course .

25-3 . Wrong Putting Green

a . Interference

Interference by a wrong putting green occurs when a ball is on the wrong putting green .

Interference to a player’s stance or the area of his intended swing is not, of itself, interference under this Rule.

b . Relief

If a player’s ball lies on a wrong putting green , he must not play the ball as it lies. He must take relief, without penalty, as follows:

The player must lift the ball and drop it within one club-length of and not nearer the hole than the nearest point of relief . The nearest point of relief must not be in a hazard or on a putting green . When dropping the ball within one club-length of the nearest point of relief , the ball must first strike a part of the course at a spot that avoids interference by the wrong putting green and is not in a hazard and not on a putting green . The ball may be cleaned when lifted under this Rule.

PENALTY FOR BREACH OF RULE:

Match play – Loss of hole; Stroke play – Two strokes.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Abnormal Ground Condition rule would apply if you holed a shot on a "double green", (a large green that had pins for two holes) where your ball went into the wrong hole. Also, I believe the PGA Championship uses a course where one of the greens is shared as the practice green.  In these cases, if your ball goes into the wrong hole, the hole is classified as a hole made by a greens keeper and Rule 25 (AGC) applies.

The main distinction between the two rules in the above scenarios is with a wrong putting green, you must take relief off the green, with a wrong hole on the same green, your nearest point of relief is most likely still on the green.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Thanks, that's what I thought, but they argued that because it was in the cup it was treated like an out of bounds or lost ball and required me to re-tee and 1 stroke penalty.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Originally Posted by newtogolf

Thanks, that's what I thought, but they argued that because it was in the cup it was treated like an out of bounds or lost ball and required me to re-tee and 1 stroke penalty.

Where do people come up with this stuff?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Originally Posted by Dormie1360

Where do people come up with this stuff?

They just make it up as they go and since many people don't bother to check out what they are told (applies to more than golf) they in turn pass it along.  It has always amazed me just how gullible & trusting a lot of people seem to be.  Kudos to the OP for seeking information on what is real.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by Rulesman

The wrong rule has been quoted above but the basic answer is correct.

Wrong Putting Green

A “wrong putting green” is any putting green other than that of the hole being played. Unless otherwise prescribed by theCommittee, this term includes a practice putting green or pitching green on the course.

25-3. Wrong Putting Green

a. Interference

Interference by a wrong putting green occurs when a ball is on thewrong putting green.

Interference to a player’s stance or the area of his intended swing is not, of itself, interference under this Rule.

b. Relief

If a player’s ball lies on a wrong putting green, he must not play the ball as it lies. He must take relief, without penalty, as follows:

The player must lift the ball and drop it within one club-length of and not nearer the hole than the nearest point of relief. The nearest point of relief must not be in a hazard or on a putting green. When dropping the ball within one club-length of the nearest point of relief, the ball must first strike a part of the course at a spot that avoids interference by the wrong putting green and is not in a hazard and not on a putting green. The ball may be cleaned when lifted under this Rule.

PENALTY FOR BREACH OF RULE:

Match play – Loss of hole; Stroke play – Two strokes.

So if the ball is dropped and first strikes a point not in a hazard and not on a putting green but then rolls into a hazard, are you: -

a) in the hazard

b) entitled to redrop

c) in the hazard if it has rolled less than 2 club length, but entitled to redrop if it has rolled 2 club lengths or more

d) none of the above

My instincts say c, can anyone confirm?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to all that responded.  I'm not a rules expert by any means but being a member of TST has certainly improved my knowledge and understanding of the rules.  Not only did they steal a stroke from me, but they made me buy them a round for the hole in 1, some friends huh?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Originally Posted by newtogolf

Thanks, that's what I thought, but they argued that because it was in the cup it was treated like an out of bounds or lost ball and required me to re-tee and 1 stroke penalty.

Originally Posted by Dormie1360

Where do people come up with this stuff?

Learning the rules by word of mouth is perhaps the best way to receive and pass on bad information.  I can't count the number of times I've been told some rule by someone who was absolutely certain in his rightness, despite the fact that he was not even close to the rule book.  There are so many popular misconceptions about how to take relief from any and all relief situations (including some where relief is not even indicated ), that the odds are better that you will be told wrong than that you will be told right.  This is the best reason I know to carry that little book in my bag at all times.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I actually had my USGA rule book on me, but if you see my other thread on pace of play, you'll better understand why I was told that would take too long and be a waste of time since they knew the rule.

Originally Posted by Fourputt

Learning the rules by word of mouth is perhaps the best way to receive and pass on bad information.  I can't count the number of times I've been told some rule by someone who was absolutely certain in his rightness, despite the fact that he was not even close to the rule book.  There are so many popular misconceptions about how to take relief from any and all relief situations (including some where relief is not even indicated   ), that the odds are better that you will be told wrong than that you will be told right.  This is the best reason I know to carry that little book in my bag at all times.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0