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ram22592

"GOLFING" - is it a word?

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This has been something that bothers me for quite some time. I say NOT because:

-"Golf" is a noun, not a verb (you can't go baseballing or basketballing, you PLAY baseball and PLAY basketball)
-I have noticed that most people that actually play golf say they "play golf", those who do not say: "are you going golfing?" or "Did you go golfing today?" or "Do you like to golf?"
***
-Things that confuse me are things like: Golfing Magazine, which has very knowledgeable writers, who have to have picked up on the title of their magazine.

Let me know what you think...

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I have played golf for 17 years, and I say I am going golfing. Just like I go Bowling, or Fishing.

To golf, to bowl, to fish...

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This has been something that bothers me for quite some time. I say

1. Where did you get the idea "golf" is NOT a verb?

2. I checked three different dictionaries and all three list "golf" as being an intransitive verb. So, yes, "golfing" is a word whether you like it or not.

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I have checked some sources as well, and some say "golfing" is the verb form and others say "to play golf" is the verb form. see this link for reference:

I love arcane trash like this. OK, here's the deciding factor, in my humble ( well, maybe not so ) opinion: my 4 year old asked me on Monday, December 31st, if we could go golfing. Knowing the temp would be abot 60 degrees, and knowing I had a tiny TaylorMade set of clubs for her, I said, "Yes," and in doing so, acknowledging that the word " golfing" was a verb. Tonight, I checked on the Websters II children's Dictionary Website, and discovered that they list the word"golfing" as a verb. Well, even though I am not a fan of Webster's, I must, in this instance, agree with them.

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I love arcane trash like this. OK, here's the deciding factor, in my humble ( well, maybe not so ) opinion: my 4 year old asked me on Monday, December 31st, if we could go golfing. Knowing the temp would be abot 60 degrees, and knowing I had a tiny TaylorMade set of clubs for her, I said, "Yes," and in doing so, acknowledging that the word " golfing" was a verb. Tonight,

as the husband of a teacher, congrats on being a good parent.

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This has been something that bothers me for quite some time. I say

I have to disagree with you. the word "GOLF" is NOT a noun, it is a verb. A noun is an object, something you can touch, or see, etc. "APPLE" is a noun. "BALL" is a noun. "GOLF" is not an object, it is something you do. "I like to golf." "Do you golf?" Those sentances make perfect sense to me, and that is the way I speak when I refer to the game. And that's all I have to say about that......

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Is snowboarding a word? Or was it originally "play snowboard"? I think I've never heard people say, "Hey, let's go play snowboard!" Similar thing for golf, it's just that golfing needs more time to be accepted as a word.

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golf stands for gentelmen only ladies forbidden

Wrong.

I have to disagree with you. the word "GOLF" is NOT a noun, it is a verb. A noun is an object, something you can touch, or see, etc. "APPLE" is a noun. "BALL" is a noun. "GOLF" is not an object, it is something you do.

"idea" is a noun. Nouns aren't just objects. "famine" is a noun too. Nouns are simply things that can be the subject or recipient of an action (I think that's one of the ways to define them).

So, no, it's not just an object. It's an object, an emotion, a concept, and a few other things. Golf is noun or verb. Golfing can also be a gerund: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerund - and when it's a gerund it acts like a noun, too. So to be clear: "Golf is a great sport. I like watching golf." (noun) "Golfing is fun. I like golfing" (gerund/noun) "He golfs his ball really well. He golfed at Pine Woods yesterday." (verb) "His golf swing is really fluid." ("golf swing" is a compound noun here, but some might also consider "golf" an adjective - it answers the question "what kind of swing?)

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As a person from the country that spawned the language, I have to say that this thread is giving me a headache so I’m going golfing

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