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TimG3394

Draw vs push draw

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Why would one elect to play a push draw instead of aiming right of target and play a straight draw?
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Originally Posted by TimG3394

Why would one elect to play a push draw instead of aiming right of target and play a straight draw?

I don't know that there is an answer to that.  Both are acceptable.  Heck, if you really wanted you could go even further left and play a pull draw. :)  I've learned (on this website, no less) that two of the greatest players of all time (Jack Nicklaus and Lee Trevino) both played push-fades.  They just aimed further left to account for it. :)

The only important part is being able to repeatedly stay within your shot-cone. http://thesandtrap.com/t/39974/shot-cones/0_30

How you line your feet up to said cone is up to you.

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as soon as I can actually choose to push or pull or draw or fade on purpose and consistently, I promise to post and opinion

hell - I'd be THRILLED to post an opinion

I can do it, on a good day, if the rest of my swing isn't gunked up, and the stars are aligned.....those are good days.

I'd just be happy to have one of those in the books - I'd hit it all the time.

(I assume the advantage to any swing is that it's the one the individual can do most consistently and effortlessly)

having more than one of those in your repertoire is a huge bonus and likely separates the exceptional from the decent....

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Why would one elect to play a push draw instead of aiming right of target and play a straight draw?

Because a slight pull on a push draw is a straight draw and a slight pull on a straight draw is a big hook.

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IMO it is just personal preference on what they have more control over and can do more consistantly.
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Originally Posted by cipher

Because a slight pull on a push draw is a straight draw and a slight pull on a straight draw is a big hook.

If you are playing for a push draw and you hit a straight draw, you are left of your target.  If you are playing for a straight draw and hit a pull draw, you are left of your target.  If the "slight" is the same amount on both shots, then you are exactly the same amount left of the target on both shots.  There is no difference.

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Originally Posted by Golfingdad

If you are playing for a push draw and you hit a straight draw, you are left of your target.  If you are playing for a straight draw and hit a pull draw, you are left of your target.  If the "slight" is the same amount on both shots, then you are exactly the same amount left of the target on both shots.  There is no difference.

I am obviously no expert.   However, for me if I align my body to the right I have a tendency to come over the top. Slight pull was the wrong way for me to describe it.  I would tend to hit an over the top pull hook, or as ssssshhhhaaank.  For me the miss left is worse if aiming the body to the right.

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I personally prefer a push draw because when I set up square to the target line, I can see the target better.  If I have to set up to the right of the target, the target is a bit behind me and I just don't feel like I'm as well connected to the target, if that makes sense.

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Originally Posted by cipher

I am obviously no expert.   However, for me if I align my body to the right I have a tendency to come over the top. Slight pull was the wrong way for me to describe it.  I would tend to hit an over the top pull hook, or as ssssshhhhaaank.  For me the miss left is worse if aiming the body to the right.

Originally Posted by David in FL

I personally prefer a push draw because when I set up square to the target line, I can see the target better.  If I have to set up to the right of the target, the target is a bit behind me and I just don't feel like I'm as well connected to the target, if that makes sense.

I bolded what I think is important.  Physics-wise, (please somebody correct me if I'm wrong :)) there is no difference.  Whatever is easiest, or most comfortable to each person is what matters.

For the record, I think the push-draw is more appealing to me for basically the same reason as David ... plus one more:

If I'm playing a push draw, I don't have to worry about screwing myself up before I hit the ball.  I align myself to the target and as long as the amount of push and draw match each other, I'm ending up at my target.  But I don't really need to know exactly how much draw that will be, could be 1 yard, could be 10.  If I'm playing a straight draw or a pull draw, then I need to know EXACTLY how much I intend to draw it to pick my start line.

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Everything else being equal, wouldnt the push draw have a bit higher ball flight?

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A push draw is a draw, just maybe a more specific way of defining the shot.  Like saying pull draw, meaning the shot start left of your start line or your body lines and curves further left (for a RHG).  "Push" just means the face was aimed right of the target at impact with the body alignments pretty square to the target at address.  That's how most pros draw the ball, aim the body at the target and aim the face right of the target.  Hitting down create some "out" and let's say the swing direction was 2 degrees to the right, so swing path will be about 4-5 degrees out with a face 2 degrees right at impact, push draw.  Aiming more right at address would just add more of a rightward path, so take the same exact swing but aim the body a little more right, now the swing direction has gone from 2 to 5, now the ball will curve more.  Could be a good way for someone who tends to swing a little left, works on it but still struggles with Key#2 and 3, to help them draw the ball.  Or even something beginners can do as long as they don't get into a bad habit of aiming right and trying to pull the ball to the target.  Like GD said Fred Couples and Jack Nicklaus just do the opposite, they aimed their body left which pre-sets the path left but you can still hit "out" at the ball.

This is why if you want to draw the ball with a driver we recommend you aim the body a little right.  Because hitting up means you're path will be "in" or left somewhat.

Good image to check out

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Basically, "push" and "pull" relate to body lines. ALL successful draws start right of the target (for a RHG), but they can be pull draws, straight draws, or push draws. It just helps someone understand more specifically what kind of draw it was, the height they'd expect to see, the mechanics one might be likely to use, etc.

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