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British Open vs. The Open Championship?

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 

What do you call it and why? Is it a Europe vs. North America thing?

 

Although I know its official name is The Open Championship, most people I know refer to it as the British Open. Must be to differentiate it from the US Open. 

post #2 of 37
The Open, because I'm British, and no one here calls it the British Open.

This may become more confusing for those that call it the British Open later this year if the Scottish decide to jump ship from the Union. Are you going to call it different things if it's in Britain to when it's in Scotland? Can't use Scottish Open as that's already the week before the Open.

As the R&A is in Scotland maybe the English venues will get kicked off the rota? More likely nowt will change.
post #3 of 37
I call it the British the Open and the US the US Open.
post #4 of 37
I use the two interchangeably.
post #5 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wansteadimp View Post

The Open, because I'm British, and no one here calls it the British Open.

This may become more confusing for those that call it the British Open later this year if the Scottish decide to jump ship from the Union. Are you going to call it different things if it's in Britain to when it's in Scotland? Can't use Scottish Open as that's already the week before the Open.

As the R&A is in Scotland maybe the English venues will get kicked off the rota? More likely nowt will change.

It should still be the British open, because even if the Scots get independence, they're on the island called Britain. They wouldn't be in the UK and they were never English though. If it's in England, Scotland, or Wales it will still be in Britain even if all 3 are independent. 

 

Personally I often refer to it as the British Open but I generally refer to champions as having X claret jugs, same as those with several green jackets. In the US it's referred to as the British Open because lots of people would get confused with the US Open if they don't know golf. I would refer to it as The Open if I'm talking to someone who knows golf though.

post #6 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foursum Golf View Post
 

What do you call it and why? Is it a Europe vs. North America thing?

 

Although I know its official name is The Open Championship, most people I know refer to it as the British Open. Must be to differentiate it from the US Open. 

 

It depends on the company I'm in.  Around sophisticated golfers, The Open is all that needs be said.  When I'm with the average golfers that I play with on my home course, just calling it The Open puts them in mind of the US Open.  That is the THE Open to them.  

 

Many would say that someone's insistence on calling the British Open "The" Open is a bit stuffy of them.  Just because it came first, it is no longer the only one, nor is it necessarily the most prestigious.  Considering that here are now quite a few high level national "Open" tournaments (including the Scottish Open, also held in Britain), I don't have any issue with calling the big one in the UK the British Open.

post #7 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

 

It depends on the company I'm in.  Around sophisticated golfers, The Open is all that needs be said.  When I'm with the average golfers that I play with on my home course, just calling it The Open puts them in mind of the US Open.  That is the THE Open to them.  

 

Many would say that someone's insistence on calling the British Open "The" Open is a bit stuffy of them.  Just because it came first, it is no longer the only one, nor is it necessarily the most prestigious.  Considering that here are now quite a few high level national "Open" tournaments, I don't have any issue with calling the big one in the UK the British Open.

Whilst the high ups in the R&A are undoubtedly stuffy (very), I imagine their insistence on "The Open" is for maximising marketing cash.

 

Interestingly the women's open is officially the Women's British Open.

post #8 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuciusWooding View Post
 

In the US it's referred to as the British Open because lots of people would get confused with the US Open if they don't know golf. I would refer to it as The Open if I'm talking to someone who knows golf though.

I almost** always say British Open for two reasons:

 

Because it's one of the four majors and another of them is also an open ... duh.  I don't need to invite an unnecessary follow up question of "Which one?"

 

And, almost more importantly at this point, because its fun and easy to annoy people who are perturbed by us obnoxious Americans calling it the British Open. :beer:

 

Maybe we should start INSISTING that the PGA Championship be called "The Championship." :-P

 

**Just like I almost always say US Open.  The exceptions for both would be during or immediately before or after they occur.  Or, basically, anytime its OBVIOUS which I'm referring to so I don't confuse anybody.

post #9 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post


And, almost more importantly at this point, because its fun and easy to annoy people who are perturbed by us obnoxious Americans calling it the British Open. c2_beer.gif
.

Bloody Yanks :)
Only messing guess, I love "y'all"

Could you guys not just call it the World Series Open??? ;)

Personally, I call The Open, The Open... But if you want to call your Open, The Open too, then I'm Open to that :)
post #10 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by hopefulhacker View Post


Could you guys not just call it the World Series Open??? ;)

Actually, since you mention it ... I have a problem with our major team sports (football, basketball, baseball) calling their championships "World" championships.  There are no NFL teams outside of the US, and there are no NBA or MLB teams outside of North America.  None of them are "World champions."

post #11 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

Actually, since you mention it ... I have a problem with our major team sports (football, basketball, baseball) calling their championships "World" championships.  There are no NFL teams outside of the US, and there are no NBA or MLB teams outside of North America.  None of them are "World champions."
Lol. The rest of the planet is annoyed that you call a game that is almost entirely played with your hands "football", and that's setting aside the fact that "football" already exists and it's played almost entirely with your feet.
a2_wink.gif
post #12 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post


Lol. The rest of the planet is annoyed that you call a game that is almost entirely played with your hands "football", and that's setting aside the fact that "football" already exists and it's played almost entirely with your feet.
a2_wink.gif

Actually, thats kind of silly to me too.  I would be all for a name change if somebody could think of a good one. :)

 

I like that soccer (sorry) is becoming so much more popular here these days, and that its not at all uncommon to hear somebody without an accent say football, and not be talking about American football.

 

By the way ... I'm so excited for the World Cup!!!  (shhh, don't tell wisguy ;))

post #13 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

Actually, since you mention it ... I have a problem with our major team sports (football, basketball, baseball) calling their championships "World" championships.  There are no NFL teams outside of the US, and there are no NBA or MLB teams outside of North America.  None of them are "World champions."

If I may speak for the rest of the world for a moment.... :) We also find this "strange" to put it nicely.

Don't get me started on the fact that you call that thing with the Super Bowl the F word.
Football is the worlds most popular sport, it is called Football everywhere apart from.....
It is played with your feet 99% of the time and 1% with your hands (goalkeeper) ... Not the reverse as you do in that game with the Super Bowl.
That game should be called Rugby with lots of protection :)

All said in jest, I do find it funny and I don't get hung up on what you call anything really ;)
post #14 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

Actually, thats kind of silly to me too.  I would be all for a name change if somebody could think of a good one. :)

I like that soccer (sorry) is becoming so much more popular here these days, and that its not at all uncommon to hear somebody without an accent say football, and not be talking about American football.

By the way ... I'm so excited for the World Cup!!!  (shhh, don't tell wisguy ;))

American Football is much closer to Rugby... I'm pretty sure it would have evolved from Rugby.
Rugby doesn't have helmets or the big padding though so what about "SoftRugby" :)

Here's a sample of some Rugby. Ironically it's got a very American soundtrack to the the video
http://youtu.be/FWILREWptvs
Edited by hopefulhacker - 2/13/14 at 8:08pm
post #15 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

(shhh, don't tell wisguy ;))
Christ no!!!
post #16 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by hopefulhacker View Post


American Football is much closer to Rugby... I'm pretty sure it would have evolved from Rugby.
Rugby doesn't have helmets or the big padding though so what about "SoftRugby" :)

Here's a sample of some Rugby. Ironically it's got a very American soundtrack to the the video
http://youtu.be/FWILREWptvs


In case you don't realize it: The "protection" is a weapon and you can hit much harder with that weapon. Back in my dad's day when all they had were small (pretty much worthless) shoulder pads and helmets (that were no more than a leather cap) they would have all been dead if they hit the way they can, and do, hit now.

 

Oh, and I call them The British Open and The US Open.

post #17 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post


Lol. The rest of the planet is annoyed that you call a game that is almost entirely played with your hands "football", and that's setting aside the fact that "football" already exists and it's played almost entirely with your feet.
a2_wink.gif

Actually, thats kind of silly to me too.  I would be all for a name change if somebody could think of a good one. :)

 

I like that soccer (sorry) is becoming so much more popular here these days, and that its not at all uncommon to hear somebody without an accent say football, and not be talking about American football.

 

By the way ... I'm so excited for the World Cup!!!  (shhh, don't tell wisguy ;))

 

At the time that Americans first started playing their form of football in the late 1800's, I doubt that soccer (or futbol) had ever been heard of in the US.  Quite frankly, despite what GD is saying, I don't see the popularity of soccer in the US.  I don't know a single sports fan who has any interest in it at all.  I find it incredibly boring to watch.  I know a number of young adults who grew up playing in school and recreational leagues while growing up (I even played a little bit of goaltender in junior high), and they don't even like the game as a spectator sport.  

 

I don't think I've ever met a person who had been to a Colorado Rapids game, yet I know many who are avid Broncos, Rockies, Nuggets, or Avalanche fans.

post #18 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

At the time that Americans first started playing their form of football in the late 1800's, I doubt that soccer (or futbol) had ever been heard of in the US.  Quite frankly, despite what GD is saying, I don't see the popularity of soccer in the US.  I don't know a single sports fan who has any interest in it at all.  I find it incredibly boring to watch.  I know a number of young adults who grew up playing in school and recreational leagues while growing up (I even played a little bit of goaltender in junior high), and they don't even like the game as a spectator sport.  

 

I don't think I've ever met a person who had been to a Colorado Rapids game, yet I know many who are avid Broncos, Rockies, Nuggets, or Avalanche fans.

I follow the English Premier League assiduously.  I am a Liverpool man.  I always liked soccer (started watching in college many yars ago as my school had a top division 2 team).  I went to Cosmos games at Giants Stadium in their heyday when they had Pele and then Franz Beckenbauer, Giorgio Chinaglia, and Carlos Alberto.   But now since the NBCSportsnetwork started covering the Premier League seriously I've gotten more hooked.  At a time where the 30 minutes of actual action in an NFL game are stretched out to 3-1/2 or even 4 hours, it is refreshing to watch a 90+ minute sports event in 2 hours with time for a halftime and pre and post game wraps.

 

As to the topic, Bobby Jones, Walter Hagen, Jack Nicklaus, and Arnold Palmer all called it the British Open in print, so that is good enough for me.  Because without those guys, and what they did there, I have doubts as to whether it would be considered a major at all, today.  Other than by courtesy, it certainly was NOT a true major from about 1930 to about 1960.

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