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JYB

Drills to make swing inside out

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I really need to get my swing more inside out because no matter what i do, i cannot. Any drills to help?
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My golf instructor had me use the "inside approach" training tool to help me. Also he had me take my regular stance, then move my right foot back and swing normally, feels odd but it really does work.
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Inside approach isnt bad. Ive used it and actually have an extra if you are interested in it. But... what I have found is that it is only a temporary fix... it forces you to swing correctly without knowing what you are doing.

The best thing that I have found is draw an arrow towards your ball at an inside angle while you are at the range. Practice swinging to right field.
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I had an over the top swing that my brain just couldn't fix. Picked up an Inside Approach at Target for $25 and used it to ingrain an inside swing. It worked and I still use it whenever I practice. My only complaint is that the foam rubber padding tears up pretty quickly. But if you got a decent hardware store, you can buy Polyethylene pipe insulation (for 1" pipe, 1" walls) cheap to replace it.

Alternatively, if you have a grass range, shove a broken shaft or a driveway marker in the ground at an angle. That will force you to go under the shaft on an inside path.

Aside from that, check out MyTPI.com for drills:
http://www.mytpi.com/mytpi05/Swing/s...l.asp?SF_ID=10

You will have to register for the link to work, but its free and there is a lot of good advice on the site.

Hope this helps.
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This is what i used to do when i had a out to in swing and i wanted to change to a in to out:

Put two tees in the ground about 10cm apart. Try and make swings that either hit the tee on the right or dont hit any tees. So basically if you hit the tee on the left, your swing is out to in. Keep having practicing swings until you NEVER hit the tee on the left.

Thats what i did and now im hitting nice draws down the middle instead of slices into the righthand side rough.

Hope that helps
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put your feet together and swing the club with your elbows tucked to your body like you are holding a handkerchef under your arm pits. practice this motion for about 20 swings.

move you leg a foot apart and practice the above drill. This drill will force you to swing inside and around your body.

just my 2 cents
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I cured my fade/slice tendency by initiating the downswing with hips instead of hands. Causes right shoulder to drop onto a lower plane creating an inside-out club path.
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I also have an outside-to-in swing path that results in fades and some nasty slices from time to time. There's something about the inside-to-out approach that mystifies me, though. Perhaps you guys can help.

Someone suggested earlier that to ingrain an inside/out swing path, think about hitting the ball to right field; however, this past weekend, a buddy of mine suggested that to cure my fade/slice, I should try to hit snap hooks on the range - i.e., hitting it to *left* field.

In my mind, I can't seem to reconcile the "right field" approach with this "left field" approach. Am I talking apples & oranges here?

(Sorry JYB - don't have any drills, but perhaps responses to my query can help out...).
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Stand on an incline, facing up the incline and take swings. You must approach from the inside and swing "up" the hill, any over the top move and your club will probably slam into the hill or you will lose balance. Side of a tee box works well. I do this when I am waiting to tee off sometimes.

http://golf.about.com/od/golftips/ss/upthehilldrill.htm
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Stand on an incline, facing up the incline and take swings. You must approach from the inside and swing "up" the hill, any over the top move and your club will probably slam into the hill or you will lose balance. Side of a tee box works well. I do this when I am waiting to tee off sometimes.

^^^ Forgot about that one. That's a good one that my pro had me do when I was trying to get rid of my outside-in swing.

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Check out my new thread in this forum "Complete your backswing, but don't stop!" Might help you finally achieve hitting from the inside.
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I also have an outside-to-in swing path that results in fades and some nasty slices from time to time. There's something about the inside-to-out approach that mystifies me, though. Perhaps you guys can help.

If your buddy told you that you need to swing towards "left" field to hit a snap hook, then he gave you incorrect information.

The only way to hit a hook/draw is to swing from the inside towards "right" field (or down the right field foul line). Trying to hit snap hooks forces you to make a severe inside to out swing. This is often needed when someone has a severe outside to in swing. It is such a different feeling and move that the only way to feel it is to try and hit a "bad" snap hook. Then you try to find that spot somewhere in between, also known as the "slot" The uphill drill, or the right foot back drill is what I use on the course to try and get back in the slot if I start to leak them right.
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1 get a 7 iron.
2 stand with a 45* angle to the target line of the ball(angle between feet target and target line) keep your shoulders square to the target line
3 then when hitting the ball try to hit inside out as possible.

this may not work for you but it sure did work for me.
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I used a cardboard box.

Get a cardboard box a foot or so square. Picture an imaginary line going straight back from the ball. Place the cardboard box just outside this line. The front corner of the box should be just short of the ball by a couple of inches.

The idea is that if your club travels on a straight line or on an inside out path you will miss the box and still hit the ball cleanly. If your club travels outside-in you'll hit the box.

It doesn't take long for you to either develop and inside-out swing or start cursing.
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I think the tee idea is great. I will have to put down that extra tee to make sure I'm not hitting out to in.
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I have been fighting this as well. I have even used a 2x4 set up just like the box drill above. Didn't really work. What has worked the most is simply laying a club down the target line with the ball about an inch from it. This helps me get aligned better as well. Which is probably why I hit it pretty 5 yard fades with just the club on the ground. I believe the outside to in swing is caused by a bunch of things. Bad Alignment, bad pivot, hands not passive-especially the right hand, an Early release, Out of sequence down swing, "hitting at the ball" instead letting the ball get in the way of the swing. I'm fighting all of it at the same time.
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Pretend there is something in front of your ball a foot and a half out and too the right.As your swinging down send your hands towards that target and not too be to quick to pull your arms around your body.

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An outside to inside swing is an effect caused by something else. Identify the cause and you'll have an idea of what and how to practice. No matter what swing aid you use (outside your swing) if you use the wrong sequence of events, you will ALWAYS swing outside to inside.

Think about your right elbow. Most coaches will tell you to keep your right elbow close to your body to swing from the inside. However, if you are using your right side to swing (right hip moving toward the ball), you will FEEL like you are swinging the correct way, but your club head will always be outside of the correct line. The solution... from the top - shift the weight to the left side, then use the left side to rotate your hips away from the ball, NOW - keep your right elbow close and keep rotating your hips AND shoulders through. Let the rotation of your shoulders square the face and not the wrists and forearms.
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