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mrprovisional

How often do you change your grips?

17 posts in this topic

Im in the market to change my grips on my G5s. Im not sure how much play these irons got since I bought them used but I did notice its time to change them simply from the wear. My question is, how often does everyone here change their grips and what is recommended in finding the right one for someone of my handicap.
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There is no "right" grip, and there is no set time to change grips. The grips you use and the amount you use them determine when to change them. I use Lamkin Crosslines, and hit about 700 balls a week, but the Lamkins are so durable, they only need to be changed once every year and a half. Golf Pride grips last a little less, maybe 9 months to a year. Winns don't last at all, maybe a few months at best.

Cord grips wear out very fast compared to solid rubber grips, as the little cords seem to get slippery fast. Wrapped grips don't last as long either, because they get smooth. The grips with little indentions like Tour Velvet and Crossline last the longest. I would recommend you change your grips when you feel like you need to hold the club firmly to keep control. Before you change them, though, try washing them in soapy water, and if that fails, take some sandpaper to them (rubber grips only).
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Agree, there is no set time. I just go by feel and when they get "slippery." I like the rubber Golf Pride DD2 series, they seem to last long and have good tackiness for me.
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I change them once a year whether they really need it or not. I do it early in the season so they can be fresh all year. If I notice a certain club is wearing more than others I will change it a second time. There is a big difference in new grips and old grips, and I much prefer the feel of the new. Once you learn how to do it yourself, it is cheap and easy to do.
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Just a little tip I have learned over the years when your grips get slippery.......If you will scrub them with 409 or almost any kitchen cleaning product it will bring back the tackiness. Works great and will help get more life out of your grips.
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Just a little tip I have learned over the years when your grips get slippery.......If you will scrub them with 409 or almost any kitchen cleaning product it will bring back the tackiness. Works great and will help get more life out of your grips.

Great advice. Dish soap & warm water...scrub 'em down good and let them dry without rinsing off the soap. Tackiness is enhanced. I prefer cords due to the ever present moisture from either damp winter air (2 short months) or the unreal humidity most of the year. They seem to last longer, too. I regrip every year....every stick but the most important...my putter. It's grip has hardened and worn slick....but I just can't bring myself to change anything about it right now...it's rolling too well.
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My friends swears by using sand paper on corded grips to replenish them.
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Another trick that i have used recently is to take rubbing alcohol, and scrub them with that.... I usually pour a bunch on a microfiber cloth, then rub it down! It really adds a lot of tack to a grip, It may decrease the life so only do it when they are almost dead to get a little longer out of them... Warm soapy water works great as a "maintenance solution", but if they are at the end of their life, try the rubbing alcohol.
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No where near as often as I should. I find that my grips don't wear all that quick, it's more of an issue with them losing their tack...+1 for the soap/sand paper. Works ALMOST everytime.
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Being in Portland, does the rain really effect them, here in colorado we don't get much of that in the summer, our moisture comes in flake form in the winter... I am considering a move to the NW and I would appreciate the info, oh and try the rubbing alcohol trick for extra tack, maybe if they aren't on their last legs, just a quick once over, instead of the tough rub down.
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Just a note about cleaning Winn grips from their web site (if you have Winns):
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Cleaning a Winn Grip
Because Winn grips have absorbent properties, they may eventually soil from dirt and perspiration from your golf glove and hands. This does not affect the performance of the grip.
To clean a Winn grip, apply a small amount of water or rubbing alcohol to a soft towel, and gently rub the grips. Do not saturate the towel. Never use a brush and soapy water to clean a Winn grip because it may damage the top surface and destroy the tackiness and slip-resistance of the grip.
DO NOT immerse Winn grips in a bucket of water to clean them. This will saturate the underlying layer of the grip and may ruin the grip.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
I have had my Winn grips for about a year and follow the above advice, seems to work well. Just FYI...
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Oops, I washed my Winn PCi's with a brush and soap several times already. Looks like their ontrack on lasting about a year and a half to two years.
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Being in Portland, does the rain really effect them, here in colorado we don't get much of that in the summer, our moisture comes in flake form in the winter... I am considering a move to the NW and I would appreciate the info, oh and try the rubbing alcohol trick for extra tack, maybe if they aren't on their last legs, just a quick once over, instead of the tough rub down.

Ya know, I don't notice the rain effecting them that much. I play golf pride multi compound grips and after about 1.5 - 2 years they tend to glaze over a bit (my experience). I lived in Sacramento for 6 years where the temps can get into the upper 90's and occasional 100's and thought my grips wore faster in that climate than the PNW. All in all, I probably play about 30% of my rounds in "wet" conditions

I hope this helps a little.
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I play 4 - 5 times a week during the spring & summer....I think as long as you keep cleaning them with soap and water....you keep the tackiness of the grip and can go an entire season without changing the grip.
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