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Anchored Putters Rules Change (Effective January 1, 2016)


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Golfers are a sturdy lot........they will find a new method to use a longer putter. Just  won't anchor it against the body.

Still not sure WHY they ruled against the stroke, just because it looks bad? Or  isn't in the spirit of the game? Reminds me of the time when they outlawed Snead's croquet style putting method.

Joe Dye ( along with USGA) simply did not like Snead. He said ( from what I have read from many sources), he even considered to rule against the side saddle style, but decide against it.

Still not sure why an "amateur" group rules for "professional" ones? I say they should have their own rules committee.

Just my opinion.

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It seems equitable to me that way.  Otherwise it burdens/impacts some players in an inequitable fashion. Calm down, or at least do some Google research before you start with the ad homin

You gotta admit, Dave, the fact that a pencil hanging from a string is affected by gravity, indisputably settles whether anchored putting is consistent with the spirit of the game. If only the

Chas, you're right.  The tapestry reveals a lot about the long putter saga.    Here Harold, Earl of Wessex, and his foursome have just checked in with the starter.  Harold is picking which cart to use

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1) Golfers are a sturdy lot........they will find a new method to use a longer putter. Just  won't anchor it against the body.

2) Still not sure WHY they ruled against the stroke, just because it looks bad? Or  isn't in the spirit of the game? Reminds me of the time when they outlawed Snead's croquet style putting method.

3) Joe Dye ( along with USGA) simply did not like Snead. He said ( from what I have read from many sources), he even considered to rule against the side saddle style, but decide against it.

4) Still not sure why an "amateur" group rules for "professional" ones? I say they should have their own rules committee.

5) Just my opinion.

1) Correct

2) Anchored is not a "stroke"

3) Irrelevant speculation.

4) PGA Tour, et al voluntarily agree to play golf in accordance with the Rules of Golf.

5) Everybody has one.

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1) Correct

2) Anchored is not a "stroke"

3) Irrelevant speculation.

4) PGA Tour, et al voluntarily agree to play golf in accordance with the Rules of Golf.

5) Everybody has one.

#3
All I know, is that after I read "Sam: The One and Only Sam Snead", by Al Barkow;  and "American Triumvirate", (the story of Hogan,Snead and Nelson),by James Dodson, I have a slightly different view of Snead and his history.

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So I use a putter in a conventional fashion however i putt in a very upright stance with a long shaft with a split hand grip.... So if you imagine I bend forward a few degrees and the shaft on my putter is 39.5 inches long. I grip the club with a gap of about 0.5 inches between my right hand which is the lowest on the shaft and my left which is higest on the grip (I'm a righty). Now as I say I swing in a conventional manner however my left forearm is resting on my stomach (do have abit of a big stomach). As it is a split hand grip it does look like the left hand/arm does not move as much as the right and my left forearm is in contact with my body through the stroke. Does this mean I would be breaking the rules next year because the anchoring ban says: Note 2: An “anchor point” exists when the player intentionally holds a forearm in contact with any part of his body to establish a gripping hand as a stable point around which the other hand may swing the club. ?
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So I use a putter in a conventional fashion however i putt in a very upright stance with a long shaft with a split hand grip.... So if you imagine I bend forward a few degrees and the shaft on my putter is 39.5 inches long. I grip the club with a gap of about 0.5 inches between my right hand which is the lowest on the shaft and my left which is higest on the grip (I'm a righty). Now as I say I swing in a conventional manner however my left forearm is resting on my stomach (do have abit of a big stomach). As it is a split hand grip it does look like the left hand/arm does not move as much as the right and my left forearm is in contact with my body through the stroke. Does this mean I would be breaking the rules next year because the anchoring ban says:

Note 2: An “anchor point” exists when the player intentionally holds a forearm in contact with any part of his body to establish a gripping hand as a stable point around which the other hand may swing the club.

?

From what you're describing, I think you're all good. From the pic below, it seems as though your description fits the "forearms held against the body" example. Maybe post a pic to confirm.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by 21degreeloft

So I use a putter in a conventional fashion however i putt in a very upright stance with a long shaft with a split hand grip.... So if you imagine I bend forward a few degrees and the shaft on my putter is 39.5 inches long. I grip the club with a gap of about 0.5 inches between my right hand which is the lowest on the shaft and my left which is higest on the grip (I'm a righty). Now as I say I swing in a conventional manner however my left forearm is resting on my stomach (do have abit of a big stomach). As it is a split hand grip it does look like the left hand/arm does not move as much as the right and my left forearm is in contact with my body through the stroke. Does this mean I would be breaking the rules next year because the anchoring ban says:

Note 2: An “anchor point” exists when the player intentionally holds a forearm in contact with any part of his body to establish a gripping hand as a stable point around which the other hand may swing the club.

?

From what you're describing, I think you're all good. From the pic below, it seems as though your description fits the "forearms held against the body" example. Maybe post a pic to confirm.

Except that he says he uses the hand of that anchored forearm as a pivot point with the hands separated, which may get him into the prohibited side of that diagram.  The allowed version in the diagram has the forearms against the body, but they all move in unison with a rotating or rocking motion.

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Except that he says he uses the hand of that anchored forearm as a pivot point with the hands separated, which may get him into the prohibited side of that diagram.  The allowed version in the diagram has the forearms against the body, but they all move in unison with a rotating or rocking motion.

Thanks to both of you that illustration helps a lot. As far as I can see it will be ok because it can't be said my left arm is anchored as it does move albeit less than the right!

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Except that he says he uses the hand of that anchored forearm as a pivot point with the hands separated, which may get him into the prohibited side of that diagram.  The allowed version in the diagram has the forearms against the body, but they all move in unison with a rotating or rocking motion.

I would think for that one to be prohibited, the left hand and top of the grip would be in contact with the chest/stomach, creating the anchor point.  The way I read his post, only the forearm is contacting his stomach.  I don't think the left hand is really a "pivot point" because it seems like it's actually moving.  But I could be reading it wrong.

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Originally Posted by Fourputt

Except that he says he uses the hand of that anchored forearm as a pivot point with the hands separated, which may get him into the prohibited side of that diagram.  The allowed version in the diagram has the forearms against the body, but they all move in unison with a rotating or rocking motion.

I would think for that one to be prohibited, the left hand and top of the grip would be in contact with the chest/stomach, creating the anchor point.  The way I read his post, only the forearm is contacting his stomach.  I don't think the left hand is really a "pivot point" because it seems like it's actually moving.  But I could be reading it wrong.

Note the part of the diagram that shows an "anchor point created by forearm".  This is the dicey part of his stroke.  Without seeing exactly what he is doing, there is definitely room for doubt that his stroke is legal.

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  • 2 months later...

As a die-hard long putter user I'm not happy with this ruling. I'll probably putt facing forward in 2016 with my my long putter and left hand near my armpit.The problem I've had in the past with face-forward putting is that you can't see of far back you are taking the club.

I'm a pretty good putter and I'm already tired of people telling me I'm using an illegal club. I imagine if I continue to use a long putter in 2016 the number of comments will be brutal.

I use a sternum style putter (48 inches) and hold it in my right hand the same way Tim Clark does so I'm curious to see what he does.

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For me, I long ago adjusted to the arm lock style and sold the old broomstick while I could still get something for it.

But, playing with an older gentleman this past weekend, I really felt bad. Mind you this guy still works and only plays once a week with the group, but his transition has not been good.

He recently put away the broomstick so he will not be handcuffed and dragged off of the course come January 2016, had his broomstick cut down to short putter size and just can not putt the ball. Words can not describe his putting motion. Last tournament the guy had 8 3 putts and I am not sure how the ball ever went in.

I am really going to feel like an a-hole this weekend since he is my first round match play championship opponent and there is no way I can concede even a 2 foot putt to him unless I am out of the hole. I know the USGA will never miss my $35/year due to their decision, but they have to be kind of desperate to offer me the same membership for $10/year now.

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I've not gone through the 100+ pages of posts, because I'm only offering a personal opinion. The long putter has been in use for over 20 years and in my (again) opinion, if the ruling bodies had heartburn with it, it should have been banned at inception. Now remember, this is (again) opinion, but I think the manufactures had a hand in this from the beginning, as they now were able to offer something new at a fairly high price for what it was, a putter with nothing more than a longer length of metal. Why, at this stage of the game does the term illegal have to come into play. Me thinks that some of the better known players (think conspiracy) for whatever rational, brought forth an argument for banning, to the powers that be and under whatever pressure that was there, the powers ruled in favor of the collective Nay Sayers. I realize that what I've put forth has more than likely been echoed a few times, but it just pisses me off that something so blatantly political in nature, has to take center stage in the game we all love........... :pound:

We now will resume normal broadcasts...................

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I've not gone through the 100+ pages of posts, because I'm only offering a personal opinion. The long putter has been in use for over 20 years and in my (again) opinion, if the ruling bodies had heartburn with it, it should have been banned at inception. Now remember, this is (again) opinion, but I think the manufactures had a hand in this from the beginning, as they now were able to offer something new at a fairly high price for what it was, a putter with nothing more than a longer length of metal. Why, at this stage of the game does the term illegal have to come into play. Me thinks that some of the better known players (think conspiracy) for whatever rational, brought forth an argument for banning, to the powers that be and under whatever pressure that was there, the powers ruled in favor of the collective Nay Sayers. I realize that what I've put forth has more than likely been echoed a few times, but it just pisses me off that something so blatantly political in nature, has to take center stage in the game we all love...........

We now will resume normal broadcasts...................

Once again, if you had read some of the other posts you would have seen it stated several times that the long putter is not "illegal".  Using it with an anchor point is what is being prohibited - the stroke not the tool.  The stroke should be made with a free swing rather than pivoted around an anchor point.  What the ruling bodies are doing is trying to keep the traditional skills in the game.  Anchoring removed one variable from the putting stroke, thus reducing in some measure the skill required to make the stroke.  This is what the ruling bodies are legislating, nothing more.

You are seeing a conspiracy where none exists.  The USGA and the R&A; are not going to be swayed by a group of "better known players".  That's a ridiculous contention.

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Once again, if you had read some of the other posts you would have seen it stated several times that the long putter is not "illegal".  Using it with an anchor point is what is being prohibited - the stroke not the tool.  The stroke should be made with a free swing rather than pivoted around an anchor point.  What the ruling bodies are doing is trying to keep the traditional skills in the game.  Anchoring removed one variable from the putting stroke, thus reducing in some measure the skill required to make the stroke.  This is what the ruling bodies are legislating, nothing more.

You are seeing a conspiracy where none exists.  The USGA and the R&A; are not going to be swayed by a group of "better known players".  That's a ridiculous contention.

If I actually cared to debate the subject of being swayed by better known players, but in a nut shell the Ping groves come to mind and if memory serves, Jack, Palmer and the players association were very vocal to both ruling bodies. Only reason the USGA settled was because Ping had the balls to sue them. R&A; being not being under abiding U.S. law was not a player.

As far as the putter or the stroke, again, it was regardless of either contention, legal when first used 20+ years ago. To me and I'm sure other's, what the ruling bodies are now legislating is wrong. But as stated several times in my previous post................it's an opinion. :whistle:

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Fourputt

Once again, if you had read some of the other posts you would have seen it stated several times that the long putter is not "illegal".  Using it with an anchor point is what is being prohibited - the stroke not the tool.  The stroke should be made with a free swing rather than pivoted around an anchor point.  What the ruling bodies are doing is trying to keep the traditional skills in the game.  Anchoring removed one variable from the putting stroke, thus reducing in some measure the skill required to make the stroke.  This is what the ruling bodies are legislating, nothing more.

You are seeing a conspiracy where none exists.  The USGA and the R&A; are not going to be swayed by a group of "better known players".  That's a ridiculous contention.

If I actually cared to debate the subject of being swayed by better known players, but in a nut shell the Ping groves come to mind and if memory serves, Jack, Palmer and the players association were very vocal to both ruling bodies. Only reason the USGA settled was because Ping had the balls to sue them. R&A; being not being under abiding U.S. law was not a player.

As far as the putter or the stroke, again, it was regardless of either contention, legal when first used 20+ years ago. To me and I'm sure other's, what the ruling bodies are now legislating is wrong. But as stated several times in my previous post................it's an opinion.

You brought it up.  If you don't want to discuss it, then.... well, you know. :doh:

The ruling bodies will accept input from many sources, but they aren't going to take orders from anyone.  They also make decisions based on their view of what is best for the game as a whole, not to please a group of lobbyists - this isn't Congress.  Note too that the grooves were ultimately rolled back, and it hasn't destroyed the game as so many cried about.

The anchored putting simply wasn't a big enough deal 20 years ago when 2 or 3 players in the world were using it - other issues took priority.  It stayed under the radar for a long time.  It was only when it suddenly became more popular with the advent of the belly putter that the RB's took serious notice and felt that the issue needed to be addressed.

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The anchored putting simply wasn't a big enough deal 20 years ago when 2 or 3 players in the world were using it - other issues took priority.  It stayed under the radar for a long time.  It was only when it suddenly became more popular with the advent of the belly putter that the RB's took serious notice and felt that the issue needed to be addressed.

In essence, that statement proves the point. It was OK back when, but low and behold it became popular. Now in reality, wouldn't one think that someone or  some few voiced a protest and it only would have any weight if money was involved (ie; Pro Tour), otherwise why would it even come to the attention of the RB's

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