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Expensive putters, are they worth it

post #1 of 58
Thread Starter 

Just a question I wanted to ask to everyone. Looking at putters at Golf Galaxy the other day and everyone was over $100, most over $150 and some were $250. I see the price and technolgy involved in other clubs such as drivers irons wedges etc were full swing come  into place shft flex, head deflection etc, Alot takes place during a normal golf swing and I see and understand why quality drivers and irons cost so much; but putters just basicly tap or guide the ball there is no or very minimal shaft flex, the head does no compress to propel the ball. Just basically asking everyone if they think an expensive putter and or putter technology is worth it, or is it just the person an there abilities that make them a good putter and not the actual putter itself. That said I understand that many putters and putter companies have there own sight alignment systems and I understand those are important, but I am basically asking about the materials used and so on not alignment tools.

post #2 of 58

I use a Ping Anser iWi and I love it.

 

Last month I bought my best man (only been playing a month and only using my old irons) a putter as a wedding thank you gift. It was £30 UKP and I'd be more than happy to use it myself if I didn't have my Anser.

 

If it feels balanced and good and it gives you confidence putting I don't think materials, technology or being blessed by a leprechaun makes any difference at all. :)

post #3 of 58

I think out of all the clubs in your bag, individual wise. the putter is the 1 club you should not worry about how expensive it is or how cheap it is.

 

You use it the most out of any club you will own. Average 2 putts per hole it puts you on 36 putts a round, no other club comes close.

 

If you find one you really like buy it!!  It could be worth getting fitted up for a putter and maybe getting a putting lesson or allignment lessons where they video you and point out any problems etc, I had one and the putter i ended up with I love.

 

I was previously usng a scotty newport.

 

Good luck :)

post #4 of 58

I think it's worth it if 1) you can comfortably afford it and 2) it feels good to you.

 

I sometimes come across a putter than is old and cheap, but feels great to me.  Sometimes I come across a 200-300 dollar putter that also feels great.  I think it's perfectly fine to spend a couple hundred on a putter if you're not taking anything away from your family.

post #5 of 58

I have putters from one end to the other. It all comes down to which one feels right, gives you confidence, and puts the ball in the hole. My favorite two putters are on oppisite ends of the price spectrum.

post #6 of 58

I have had a smug feeling about high dollar putters for a long time, but lately I have realized my smuggness so is not totally justified. My main putter for over 30 years has been a forged, heel shafted, flanged blade.  It was given to me by a golfing buddy, but at the time cost around $40.  Using the same inflation as other clubs, my $40 putter would now retail for  150-200, so I am not so smug anymore!  My old putter though, has great feel and really does the job if I do mine.

 

Putters are very personal and one with the right feel( and sight markings, weighting) etc will help your game, but just going and buying a $300 putter won't make you a scratch golfer.  If every other aspect of your game is in good shape and all you need is better putting, get a putting lesson and fitting.  Find a putter that you can hole the putts with whether it is a $50 used Anser II, or a custom $400 Scotty.  If you are not hitting a lot of greens or at least getting close, I'd fix that first before investing in an expensive putter.

 

Your question was though, are they worth it?  Well in terms of craftsmanship and materials, I think some are a bit inflated due to marketing hype and so forth. But only you can decide if you like one enough to separate you from your money.  For me, if I had the discretionary funds, I might find a used Scotty I liked, and then send it back to the custom shop.  For slightly more that the price of an off the shelf new Scotty, I'd have one customized to my likes. I'd just like to. But I am not sure I could putt any better than I can with old George.

post #7 of 58

I can definitely speak for someone who really didn't try a ton of putters before I bought my Whitehot XG (Oddysey). I had about $100 to spend. Tried about 3-4 putters, and really loved the feel of my putter, and didn't look back, because I didn't want to confuse myself, plus, I knew I would've spent hours trying to pick while comparing. Good luck!! And pick the one that feels the best, don't worry what the name is or what color it is.

post #8 of 58

Got my scotty in mint condition for 150.  A 300 dollar putter for a reasonable price...

post #9 of 58

Have a low-tech scotty in the basement, and a high-tech Rife in the bag.  Right now the Rife makes more putts.  

 

Spend enough on a putter to have confidence in it, but not enough to expect it to make your putts for you.

post #10 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by delav View Post

Spend enough on a putter to have confidence in it, but not enough to expect it to make your putts for you.

 

Truer words have never been spoken or (in this case) posted.

 

post #11 of 58

Putter is important no doubt, but I don't buy the argument that it's the most important club because you use is so often (whether that be 30, 34, 38, or 42 times a round).  It's the nature of golf that whatever is used on the green will technically take up the most strokes.  But I'm betting lots of guys here could switch to putting with their 3 wood or hybrid and still keep it down to 36 putts per round.  And any putter, any putter would be easier to use than that.  Obviously putting is personal, and the choice is personal, so get what you like.  I usually play my Circa 62 'cause I like it, but I'll putt nearly the same with any putter.

post #12 of 58

If you think it's worth it, it's worth it.  If I ever convince myself to buy a $300 putter, I'll think it's worth it, (it's not far-fetched that I'd become convinced, I've spent dumber money).

post #13 of 58

Absolutely............

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

...... says the guy who's soon going to be picking up an $800 putter, and selling them ($375 to $800). You'll hear more from me later, but for now, edelgolf.comFWIW, $800 for a putter I'll have for the rest of my lifetime, or 20+ years at a minimum, absolute bargain.

post #14 of 58

Having confidence is the most important factor in a putter. My dad used a 5 buck putter for years and could putt "lights out".  I also have a buddy who has a room full of expensive putters - and switches more often than he changes his socks.   I have a Ping that I love and use with confidence - but have number of other on hand "just in case"!

post #15 of 58

Whatever helps your confidence in putting, then go with it. I have a $30 putter I bought 6 years ago and I wouldn't trade it for any other putter because I know it so well. If you find one you like, go with it, it can only help you.

post #16 of 58
There are a lot of subtleties between putters. Buy the one that's the best trade-off between price and feel. Don't buy one just because it's more expensive, because you're right, primarily it is the indian and not the arrow. That said, those subtleties can make a stroke or so of difference. You will likely have a lot of putts that miss within an inch of the hole. The correct putter helps you fix that last inch.
post #17 of 58

Whether or not an expensive putter is, "worth it" is really a personal decision.  If a putter inspires you and give you more confidence to sink putts, then its worth it.

post #18 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

Absolutely............

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

...... says the guy who's soon going to be picking up an $800 putter, and selling them ($375 to $800). You'll hear more from me later, but for now, edelgolf.comFWIW, $800 for a putter I'll have for the rest of my lifetime, or 20+ years at a minimum, absolute bargain.


This may redefine 'expensive putter' in the eyes of the OP.

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