or Connect
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Tour Talk › Americans and Brits Shouting!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Americans and Brits Shouting!

post #1 of 364
Thread Starter 

So what does everyone think of Americans shouting utterly stupid remarks when someone tees off. 550 yds par 5 and wait for it "Get in the hole" or "Mashed potato". Doesn't seem to happen in European events or other tours around the world.

post #2 of 364

It's just the fans having fun...no harm no foul.

post #3 of 364

Personally, I would not be the one yelling something like that, but I'm a little more subdued and conservative.  As golf has gone a little more mainstream and attracted a little different crowd this has become more frequent, people looking to attract attention to themselves.  It gets old, listening to that on every hole, but it also means there are people watching the tournament, which is good.

post #4 of 364

I wish they would not allow shout outs from the crowd. There are plenty of other rules. Make that a rule. Yell after a swing and you are asked to leave.

post #5 of 364
Quote:
Originally Posted by rustyredcab View Post

I wish they would not allow shout outs from the crowd. There are plenty of other rules. Make that a rule. Yell after a swing and you are asked to leave.

 

I agree completely with this.  A roar for a great shot is fine.  Yelling something stupid to be heard on television is the same distraction as a camera or a cellphone, especially when the jackasses jump the gun and yell it before impact.

post #6 of 364
There was shouting at the British.
post #7 of 364

I don't watch enough Euro events, but they mostly seem sparsely attended. Harder to muster up a shout when there's a dozen spectators. And the Euro unemployment rate for those in their 20s is so high, they can't afford to go to tournaments.

post #8 of 364

From my novel. The setup - Billy is a fictitous touring pro who is trying to get his life and game back together. His caddy is Shakes:

 

 

Billy liked playing the John Deere Classic anyway. “Great event for the meat and potatoes guys on the tour. Most of the big names skip it to head over for the British Open. That leaves a nice purse for the rest of us.” And the crowds at the John Deere liked Billy. He was ‘one of them,’ as a result of his reputation of being a bit of a partier, his salty language, and, of course, his brashness. Billy definitely was not a cookie-cutter Robo-Pro. And in the first round, his gallery was larger, and more vocal, than what normally follows him.

An example was when Billy was on the tee of the third hole, a brutally difficult dogleg-left 470-yard par four. Going through his usual mental checklist, he visualized a hard-drawing drive that would get on the ground quickly and roll. He swung confidently, and the ball flew off the clubface exactly as intended.

“GET IN THE HOLE!” came the yell from a member of the accompanying gallery.

Billy winced.

“You know something Shakes? I think I’ve had just about enough of that,” Billy said as he handed him the driver.

“Enough of what, B.E.?”

Billy took a brand new golf glove from his bag and the Sharpie from his back pocket that he used to mark his golf ball, and walked over to the group of spectators from where the yell came from.

“Yo B.E., what are you doing?”

“I got this, Shakes.”

Shakes was half tempted to literally grab Billy by the arm and to yank him back, physically and mentally, inside the ropes. ‘Oh God B.E., don’t do it,’ thought Shakes, but it was too late.

Billy addressed the gallery. “Hey everyone thanks for coming out and supporting the tour. I got a question. Who yelled out ‘Get in the hole’ after I hit my drive?”

Shakes was damn near hyperventilating now with visions of a suspension coming Billy’s way.

A couple of members of the gallery pointed out the young man who was wearing a blue Nike cap just like Billy’s. Billy approached the lad and said, “Hey. What’s your name?”

The young man was shaking, both with fear and excitement, “John…Johnny. You’re the best, Billy.”

“Nice to meet you Johnny,” as Billy started writing on his golf glove with the Sharpie. “You know, Johnny,” Billy continued, “That this is a 470-yard par four, right?”

“Yeah I know,” Johnny replied. “You’re the man, Billy…you’re my favorite player…”

“Thank you, Johnny. Now, you know it is physically impossible for me to reach the green from the tee, right?”

“Yes sir.”

“So it is, therefore, impossible for me to put the ball in the hole from this tee, right?”

“Yes sir.”

“So Johnny, you really don’t have to yell for the ball to get in the hole when I hit my tee shot, do you?” By this time the one hundred or so people surrounding Billy and Johnny started laughing. “Here,” Billy said, smiling, as he handed Johnny the personally autographed golf glove, “I appreciate you rooting for me and being part of my gallery. Keep it up. Shit, bring your friends. But Johnny, you can’t change the laws of physics by yelling for something to occur that is impossible to happen. So you might want to stop doing that.”

Billy smiled and gave Johnny a pat on the shoulder, and received an ovation from the gallery. He then walked back to a stunned Shakes, and they started walking down the fairway.

“That,” said Shakes, “Was about the coolest thing I’ve ever seen someone do on the golf course, B.E. Those idiots yelling shit out, someone had to do something about it.”

“Kill ‘em with kindness, Shakes.”

“Well shit, B.E., six months ago you would have just killed him.”

Billy slapped Shakes on the back and let out a loud belly laugh.

post #9 of 364

People elsewhere in the world do it too. Maybe not as often, but then again, a regular PGA Tour event draws a lot more people than a regular European Tour event.

post #10 of 364

And boorish behavior in European sports events - see football. Actually, we're tamer in comparison.

post #11 of 364

I'm old enough to recall fans only applauding winners in tennis and sitting quietly when someone hit a ball out -- except at the Italian Open where they cheered everything; even double faults. The cheering then moved to the US events and British events were the last where fans applauded every point.

 

But shouting out has not become common in the tennis events I watch on TV. And it is amazing that fans are quiet during points in tennis and pre-shot stuff in golf. 

post #12 of 364

I think it's silly. I've never done it and dont ever plan on doing it.

post #13 of 364
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamo View Post

There was shouting at the British.

 

Was it just me or did anyone else hear them yelling, "Bangers and Mash!"? 

post #14 of 364

Crazed fans.  Must be all the meth and bath salts people are using?

post #15 of 364
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamo View Post

There was shouting at the British.

Actually it is called "The Open".

post #16 of 364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimmy3putts View Post

Actually it is called "The Open".

 

What is? The British Open? a3_biggrin.gif

post #17 of 364
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

What is? The British Open? a3_biggrin.gif

 

There is a Welsh Open, a Scottish Open and an Irish Open but alas, no British Open. The so called British Open is often mistakenly called so by ignorant Americans (Nevets88) who are not bright enough to differentiate between the US Open and the one held across "The pond" in Britain, The Open Championship. We gave you this wonderful game and look what you are doing to it. You know, the same sort of people who shout "get in the hole" while standing with their super-sized coke resting on their even bigger waist lines at the tee of a par 5. Invading greens in The Ryder Cup, giving us The circus (JD), War on the Shore..... need I go on? No, I won't.

 

Incidently Netvets88, check out the attendance figures for this years Open Championship.

post #18 of 364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimmy3putts View Post

There is a Welsh Open, a Scottish Open and an Irish Open but alas, no British Open. The so called British Open is often mistakenly called so by ignorant Americans (Nevets88) who are not bright enough to differentiate between the US Open and the one held across "The pond" in Britain, The Open Championship.

 

I figured you'd bite. Didn't figure you'd be rude about it though.

 

Guess what? My "Open" says "Open Championship" right on the trophy.

 

The recent push to rename the British Open as the snooty "Open Championship" as if it's the "open" for the entire world is just that - recent. You guys needed some Americans (namely Arnie) to liven your event back up a bit.

 

Now for some common sense: your "Open Championship" is the national open of wherever you live. The PGA Championship is called that here, while overseas, it's often called the US PGA Championship. Just as your "open tournament" is called the British Open. I know Canadians who call the thing after the British Open "the Open" because, to them, it is their national open.

 

But none of that's the topic here, and being an admin has its privileges: I get the last word in this thread on the name of the British Open. a3_biggrin.gif (Find one of the existing threads where people argue about that and revive it if you'd like.)

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tour Talk
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Tour Talk › Americans and Brits Shouting!