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miura vs. mizuno


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I'm saving up for a set or Witch-forged irons. The set I have now was forged by trolls and I can only use them at night.

I feel I'm as unbiased as I can be in the golf world. I build clubs for a living and dont get payed to walk to course yet so I meerely play what works for me. My current set up is Titleist 910

Witch forged iron is better? Which has a better forging process? Price? Any info, please post. Thanks

I was recently considering a new set of irons (before I got my 68's) and i was put onto JDM (Japanese Domestic Market irons).

Miuras will be slightly more expensive than Mizunos. I was looking at Miura's and someone who was more knowledgeable advised that Miura had plans to expand and they ended up moving their forgings to China and were essentially trying to turn into a bigger player in the golf club market (thereby implying a decrease in their quality). Many people who I spoke to spoke very highly of Epons which are forged by Endo... supposedly Endo forges some of the highest quality irons around. Epon just came out with some new irons as well. I've also heard that Epon is trying to expand their market share. A set of Epons or Miuras custom built (swingweight, length, loft, shaft, lie, etc.) will run you around 1500-2000. At the end of it all, I really couldn't tell the difference between the three after demoing them extensively and I ended up going with the Mizunos because of their fitting system and also because I didn't want to fork over about 200 bucks an iron for a difference i could not even notice.
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You can't really compare the two. They are in different price ranges. Its like comparing a bmw m5 to a bmw 535i. They are both really awesome, but the higher priced one is better quality and more exclusive. It's golf though, so murias dont mean you will shoot lower scores than mizuno...so it the extra cash really worth it?
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Miuras are much more expensive, but they're much more satisfying to have in your bag. I mean, any Mizuno iron is satisfying and looks awesome in your bag, let alone a Miura!!
Of course that's amongst golfers who actually have an idea about golf clubs and manufacturers. The average Joe might think Miura is some knock-off brand.
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You arent going to notice much difference in feel from Mizunos to Miuras. With Miuras you are paying more money for a name and for a club that is more exclusive.
There is no difference in the forgings process or in the quality of materials used.
If Miuras truly are now forged in China, that would be one reason why Id go with Mizunos. Mizunos are still forged in Japan and the factory which forges Mizunos irons makes irons ONLY for Mizuno.
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  • 2 years later...
I have played Mizuno for the past 25 yrs and still have a set of mp63's, I Also have a set of miura cb202 irons. When it comes to feel, they are very different. The forging process is completely different as the steel is treated in differently plus the hosel on the Miura is forged as a different component and spin welded to the rest of the face making the fitting of the shaft more precise. I have weighted the heads without shafts of bothie sets and the variation in miura is less than 1% with the mizuno more than 6% . This indicates quality!! Further to claim that Mizuno have a better fitting system is also not correct as all miura clubs are custom fitted by a filly qualified and accredited fitter approved by Miura. Mizuno make great clubs but is a commercial brand. Miura is a specialist manufacturer and does not produce mass products. In short you pay for a much higher level of craftsmanship. Both my sets are fitted with KBS tour S flex shafts, same grips and same lofts, lies and swing weight, custom build by the same fitter. The feel of the miura is soft but solid, the mizuno is more firm. To me the difference is in the ball flight and consistancy. As a low handicap who plays competitive tournament golf, the money is worth the spend for the clubs. I am not sure if a higher handicap will see the difference
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Witch forged iron is better? Which has a better forging process? Price? Any info, please post. Thanks

The better is the one you prefer. There is no major difference in the quality of the clubs. They may feel different, but between the two brands, you are good either way. As others have mentioned, Miura are more expensive.

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Originally Posted by Jamesdw

I have played Mizuno for the past 25 yrs and still have a set of mp63's, I

Also have a set of miura cb202 irons. When it comes to feel, they are very different. The forging process is completely different as the steel is treated in differently plus the hosel on the Miura is forged as a different component and spin welded to the rest of the face making the fitting of the shaft more precise. I have weighted the heads without shafts of bothie sets and the variation in miura is less than 1% with the mizuno more than 6% . This indicates quality!! Further to claim that Mizuno have a better fitting system is also not correct as all miura clubs are custom fitted by a filly qualified and accredited fitter approved by Miura. Mizuno make great clubs but is a commercial brand. Miura is a specialist manufacturer and does not produce mass products. In short you pay for a much higher level of craftsmanship. Both my sets are fitted with KBS tour S flex shafts, same grips and same lofts, lies and swing weight, custom build by the same fitter.

The feel of the miura is soft but solid, the mizuno is more firm. To me the difference is in the ball flight and consistancy. As a low handicap who plays competitive tournament golf, the money is worth the spend for the clubs. I am not sure if a higher handicap will see the difference


Considering that all Miura does is put his own grind on the clubs and just assemble them (Endo does their forging for them), its a bit of a myth for anyone could call them a, "specialty" manufacturer.  Miura makes millions of clubheads every year, for various manufacturers.

If you want to drink the Kool-Aid and tell yourself that Miura is of such better quality, well, Im sure Miura-san thanks you.

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Originally Posted by Jamesdw

I have played Mizuno for the past 25 yrs and still have a set of mp63's, I

Also have a set of miura cb202 irons. When it comes to feel, they are very different. The forging process is completely different as the steel is treated in differently plus the hosel on the Miura is forged as a different component and spin welded to the rest of the face making the fitting of the shaft more precise. I have weighted the heads without shafts of bothie sets and the variation in miura is less than 1% with the mizuno more than 6% . This indicates quality!! Further to claim that Mizuno have a better fitting system is also not correct as all miura clubs are custom fitted by a filly qualified and accredited fitter approved by Miura. Mizuno make great clubs but is a commercial brand. Miura is a specialist manufacturer and does not produce mass products. In short you pay for a much higher level of craftsmanship. Both my sets are fitted with KBS tour S flex shafts, same grips and same lofts, lies and swing weight, custom build by the same fitter.

The feel of the miura is soft but solid, the mizuno is more firm. To me the difference is in the ball flight and consistancy. As a low handicap who plays competitive tournament golf, the money is worth the spend for the clubs. I am not sure if a higher handicap will see the difference

Thanks James for your 100% credible assessment of the awesome power of Miura cavity backs in the hands of a low handicap competitive tournament golfer.

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Originally Posted by maraca2020

Witch forged iron is better? Which has a better forging process? Price? Any info, please post. Thanks

Witch forged irons are probably a bit better than grain flow forged irons, but it'll cost you . . .

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Quote:
Originally Posted by verse214 View Post
None

I was looking at Miura's and someone who was more knowledgeable advised that Miura had plans to expand and they ended up moving their forgings to China and were essentially trying to turn into a bigger player in the golf club market (thereby implying a decrease in their quality). Many people who I spoke to spoke very highly of Epons which are forged by Endo. .. supposedly Endo forges some of the highest quality irons around. Epon just came out with some new irons as well. I've also heard that Epon is trying to expand their market share.

Not so it would seem:-

######## Miura makes its forged clubs -- irons, wedges and putters -- in the company's one factory and one forge, both in the city of Himeji, which was for centuries the seat of the ancient Japanese art of samurai sword making. While demand for those weapons has diminished, the generations of steelmaking skill and passion have not -- and these are the attributes that the Miura family brings to the creation of the world's best golf weapons.

Katsuhiro Miura, who began making golf clubs in 1957, hand-grinds clubs in his factory every day alongside Yoshitaka Miura, while Shinei Miura supervises the forging. Miura clubs are made one by one, using many handcrafting processes, and will never be mass produced. Special forging techniques assure that the grain of the steel in each club will be fine and uniform, with no voids or tiny bubbles that could interfere with the famous Miura purity of the strike. This grain, more comparable to a jar of sand than a jar of marbles, is the result of careful and patient forging and finishing, and it sets Miura apart from other clubs.#########

Source - Miura web site.

http://www.miuragolf.com/about.asp

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Of course everything on a corporate website is 100% accurate and factual....

Originally Posted by burner

Not so it would seem:-

######## Miura makes its forged clubs -- irons, wedges and putters -- in the company's one factory and one forge, both in the city of Himeji, which was for centuries the seat of the ancient Japanese art of samurai sword making. While demand for those weapons has diminished, the generations of steelmaking skill and passion have not -- and these are the attributes that the Miura family brings to the creation of the world's best golf weapons.

Katsuhiro Miura, who began making golf clubs in 1957, hand-grinds clubs in his factory every day alongside Yoshitaka Miura, while Shinei Miura supervises the forging. Miura clubs are made one by one, using many handcrafting processes, and will never be mass produced. Special forging techniques assure that the grain of the steel in each club will be fine and uniform, with no voids or tiny bubbles that could interfere with the famous Miura purity of the strike. This grain, more comparable to a jar of sand than a jar of marbles, is the result of careful and patient forging and finishing, and it sets Miura apart from other clubs.#########

Source - Miura web site.

http://www.miuragolf.com/about.asp

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I have spoken some really credible club builders and they say that it always amazes them how some clubheads are passed through quality assurance and released from most OEM's.  Case in point he had a set of brand new irons from Titleist that he had just finished switching shafts on and he told me to look at them and see if I noticed anything odd about them......As I glanced at the clubheads I couldn't believe that none of the hosels were the same length.  Then he moved my attention to the Mizuno irons on the shelf and he showed me that they had tip weights in some of them which meant that the clubheads weren't the correct weights and so tip weights were installed in them to bring them up to the stock swingweight.  He said that he sees it all the the time from OEM's and that it makes it difficult for him to work on the clubs because what if he needed to add weighting then he would have a problem.

Believe it or not he said that Miura was always within one gram of the stated weight and he actually praised Cleveland also which surprised me.  I hit many a Mizuno iron before I hit one ball with a Miura and I will say that the feel of the two are not even close to each other.  Miura irons are also remarkably durable also which was a welcome finding also.  Even my friend who swears by blades and thought that he had hit everything was shocked when he hit the baby blades this past weekend while he was in town. he said that he had never hit a club that felt like that through impact.

Miura and Mizuno are not the same class of iron....no way....Mizuno's are nice but I would be willing to bet that anyone who has played Miura for an extended period of time will say that there is definately a difference in the sensation through impact.

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Miura and Mizuno are not the same class of iron....no way....Mizuno's are nice but I would be willing to bet that anyone who has played Miura for an extended period of time will say that there is definately a difference in the sensation through impact.

Makes you wonder why players who earn tens of millions per year, or those without contracts don't use them doesn't it? Emperor's new clothes? If something was so obviously superior, it would be the choice of every player who could afford it, and many who couldn't. And, BTW,who are these "really credible" club builders who don't realise that Titleist irons have different hosel lengths as part of their design? :-)

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Both are great irons. To any but the best ball strikers, the difference will be miniscule at most. Save the money and go with the Mizunos unless you demo the Miuras and happen to like them significantly better. Keep us posted with what you decide on.

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Originally Posted by Shorty

Makes you wonder why players who earn tens of millions per year, or those without contracts don't use them doesn't it?

Emperor's new clothes?

If something was so obviously superior, it would be the choice of every player who could afford it, and many who couldn't.

And, BTW,who are these "really credible" club builders who don't realise that Titleist irons have different hosel lengths as part of their design?

Are you seriously bringing up the fact that player's are paid to play Mizuno clubs...if so then bring up the fact that Miura forges many tour pros clubs and then puts and OEM badges on them. Alot of player's play Miura irons, they just have someone else's logo on them....I bet you think that a Bugatti Veyron is the same as a Volkwagon because that is the group that owns them.  Golf clubs like cars are not created equal because if they were then why would people even play Mizuno when they could play a knock off clone golf clubs for less than a hundred bucks probably.

Everyone also brings up the price of the Miura and the fact that they are about 200 bucks a club....well my 5-PW set cost $1200 which isn't any more expensive than a set of 3-PW Mizuno irons especially since most don't even use the 3 and 4 iron.  My clubs were fitted, and custom weighted to my request and then checked again to ensure the proper fit and distance spacing on Trackman in two 1 hour sessions.  Call Mizuno and tell them to hook you up with a E1 swingweight and see how far you get. You betta have a tour card !!

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