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mattman86

Partners worry too much about threesome behind

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Hello world! New to the forum though I have been stalking it for at least a year now. For my inaugural thread I bring up an issue that bugs me often.

Pace of play is an issue we can talk about for days, months, and years. My issue isn't with the pace being too slow. I understand that municipal courses are going to play slow so I try to relax and at least enjoy the scenery. If I want to get a four hour game in I know I have to pay for it and am better off getting out early.

What bugs me is when I play with my brother, father, girlfriend, co-worker, etc. almost every one of them starts freaking out on the second fairway because they see a twosome or threesome getting onto the first green. They don't take the time to line up their shot or take a deep breath for fear of slowing down pace of play.

I appreciate their concern, but they get so stressed about it that they don't enjoy the round. I point out to them (especially at muni courses) that they can take their time as the threesome has only now pulled the pin. When we are walking up the next fairway I point out that the threesome just drove each of their balls into the woods only 40 yards from the tee, so we have nothing to worry about concerning pace of play. Still they fret and end up taking terrible shots because they want to move as quickly as possible.


What do any of you say to help them focus better and enjoy the game??

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I am glad you brought this up. I too have been guilty of fretting too much about the group behind my group. And too often, I will let this group play through when the situation really isn't called for yet. I did this more often when my game was not as good. Now, that I am improved and more experienced, I don't worry about it as much.

Tell them relax and enjoy and if the group behind you all continues to creep up on you all, then you will let them play through on a Par 3. People understand that we sometimes have to wait on the golf course. No one is bothered about being held up on 4 holes or less.

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Hello world! New to the forum though I have been stalking it for at least a year now. For my inaugural thread I bring up an issue that bugs me often.

Pace of play is an issue we can talk about for days, months, and years. My issue isn't with the pace being too slow. I understand that municipal courses are going to play slow so I try to relax and at least enjoy the scenery. If I want to get a four hour game in I know I have to pay for it and am better off getting out early.

What bugs me is when I play with my brother, father, girlfriend, co-worker, etc. almost every one of them starts freaking out on the second fairway because they see a twosome or threesome getting onto the first green. They don't take the time to line up their shot or take a deep breath for fear of slowing down pace of play.

I appreciate their concern, but they get so stressed about it that they don't enjoy the round. I point out to them (especially at muni courses) that they can take their time as the threesome has only now pulled the pin. When we are walking up the next fairway I point out that the threesome just drove each of their balls into the woods only 40 yards from the tee, so we have nothing to worry about concerning pace of play. Still they fret and end up taking terrible shots because they want to move as quickly as possible.

What do any of you say to help them focus better and enjoy the game??

It's a valid question.  I hate being pushed too, so I understand.  But being pushed means that there has to be someplace to go.  As long as your group is maintaining it's position directly behind the group in front of you, you there's not much more to be done.

But, on the other hand.....

...... if the group in front of you is pulling away, (you'll know that because you're seldom waiting for them to hit their shots or clear the green) it's time to heed the other players in your group and pick up the pace.  That doesn't mean you have to rush.....it means playing ready golf, preparing to play while someone else is already playing, and moving with a sense of urgency.  Most people who feel rushed are simply unaware of how inefficient they are on the course.  They spend more time watching other members of their group hit than they do moving to and preparing for their own shot.  As a result, they feel rushed to hit their own shot.  Learn to move with an efficient sense of purpose. By the time it's your time to putt, you should have read your putt, replaced your ball, and be ready to pull the trigger.  Ditto on an approach shot.  Unless you're going to be moving directly into the path of another player, move forward to your ball and get ready for your shot.  When the green clears, all 4 members of a group shouldn't take much more than a minute for them ALL to have hit their approach shot and be moving on. Remember......your proper position on the course is directly behind the group in front of you.  Not directly in front of the group behind you. ;-)

Finally, if you do have a fast 2-some breathing down your neck, consider letting them through even if there's really not anyplace to go.  They may not move any faster, but you'll feel better with them in front of you, rather than on your butt all day.

Tell them relax and enjoy and if the group behind you all continues to creep up on you all, then you will let them play through on a Par 3. People understand that we sometimes have to wait on the golf course. No one is bothered about being held up on 4 holes or less.

It's often easier to let someone play through on a par-5......especially a good 2-some or 3-some if you're playing with slower or less skilled players.  Hit your tee shots, then wait and allow them to catch up and hit theirs....then you all move out together.  The better players will be GONE before you even know it.  You won't lose more than a minute or two and will have plenty of breathing room behind you.

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The rule of thumb on this is pretty clear, if you are directly behind the group in front of you, you are in the right position and there is nothing to worry about with the group behind.

Now, if the group in front is a problem, call the clubhouse and ask a marshal to roll through.

Edit: What David said

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Agreed with everyone regarding pace. When walking I always stress to my group to always be moving forward (stop to watch a partners shot so as to have multiple eyes on the ball so we can find it faster) but that we don't need to walk together to eachothers ball. Also agree to let people play through if they do eventually catch up (so long as there is somewhere to go). My trouble is convincing my playing partners that we are keeping pace and they have time to line up their shot and take a breath. I suppose I just need to play with them more and point out how effectively we're keeping pace.... or throw them another beer to calm down :)

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What bugs me is when I play with my brother, father, girlfriend, co-worker, etc. almost every one of them starts freaking out on the second fairway because they see a twosome or threesome getting onto the first green. They don't take the time to line up their shot or take a deep breath for fear of slowing down pace of play.

I appreciate their concern, but they get so stressed about it that they don't enjoy the round. I point out to them (especially at muni courses) that they can take their time as the threesome has only now pulled the pin. When we are walking up the next fairway I point out that the threesome just drove each of their balls into the woods only 40 yards from the tee, so we have nothing to worry about concerning pace of play. Still they fret and end up taking terrible shots because they want to move as quickly as possible.

What do any of you say to help them focus better and enjoy the game??

I'm replying because your playing partners remind me a lot of me. I do exactly the same thing to speed up play. I am very happy to see someone actually cares about our enjoyment level when we play the game with them.  So I will tell you the words I'd love to hear and maybe they would too.

"I found a good golf course that we don't have to rush our shots or hurry up on, and maybe let a couple of faster groups play through so that we can have a good time."

That will help put our minds at ease and we can better enjoy our round too.

Thanks for the thread.

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Quote:
if the group in front of you is pulling away, (you'll know that because you're seldom waiting for them to hit their shots or clear the green) it's time to heed the other players in your group and pick up the pace.  That doesn't mean you have to rush.....it means playing ready golf, preparing to play while someone else is already playing, and moving with a sense of urgency.  Most people who feel rushed are simply unaware of how inefficient they are on the course.  They spend more time watching other members of their group hit than they do moving to and preparing for their own shot.  As a result, they feel rushed to hit their own shot.  Learn to move with an efficient sense of purpose. By the time it's your time to putt, you should have read your putt, replaced your ball, and be ready to pull the trigger.  Ditto on an approach shot.  Unless you're going to be moving directly into the path of another player, move forward to your ball and get ready for your shot.  When the green clears, all 4 members of a group shouldn't take much more than a minute for them ALL to have hit their approach shot and be moving on. Remember......your proper position on the course is directly behind the group in front of you.  Not directly in front of the group behind you. ;-)

Love your posts, Dave, but I'm going to totally disagree with you here.

We've had this argument before, so it could be yelling into the wind, but I (and I seem to be the only one) think its silly to base your pace of play on the group in front of you.  Of course, you should be efficient and do the things you suggest here - that is obviously preferred.  However, I'm not going to get out of my game simply because I happen to be put behind some speed demons that day.  Similarly, I don't feel rushed if I happen to be put in front of some speed demons.

I know that most here prefer to judge pace of play based on keeping up with the group in front.  That's silly.  5 hours is slow, unless the group in front is playing on a 5 1/2 hour pace.  3 1/2 hours is slow if the group in front is playing a 3 hour pace.  Those are subjective standards that will get you out of the rhythem of your game.

You need to play fast enough to keep up with the posted round time at the course.  If the course doesn't have a posted time, then 4 hours is appropriate in my mind.  If you finish the round in 3 hours and 45 minutes, your fine.  It doesn't matter, IMO, that the group in front of you might have played it in 3 hours.  The total, objective time is important, not your speed relative to the other groups.

If the group in front of me is playing in 3 hours, I feel no need to rush my game to "keep up".  Similarly, if the group in front of me is on a 5 hour pace, I'm going to be put out of my game.  I'm not "fast" because I'm "keeping up".  The total round time is what matters.

OP, I'd ask in the pro shop what the round time is and stay within it.  As long as you are abiding my the posted pace of play, ignore everyone else.  If there is no posted pace of play, pick one you think is reasonable (4 hours, 3 3/4 hours, tc...) and play to it.

It is just as jarring / silly to get out of your game playing fast to keep up with the group in front as it is to play fast to keep ahead of the group behind you.  Basing your speed on other people doesn't make sense to me.  Basing it on an objective, posted standard does.

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Johnclayton,

Thinking about it that way I totally agree with you and I think that is what I need to stress to my partners. Play your game within the limits of etiquette. As long as you aren't hitting two balls or taking a ridiculous amount of practice swings tune out the group behind and in front. If the group behind catches up because they are scratch golfers who never lose a ball it doesn't matter what you do, your pace is going to be "slow". I think thats where the problem comes up - where partners think we are going too slow even though we are keeping a very good pace, the group behind is just playing faster than average.

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I agree with john here, keeping up with the group in front of you isn't necessarily what you need to do. Especially if they have fewer players and/or are playing exceptionally fast. If you had 3 or 4 people who typically play at the pace I play you'd be hard pressed to keep up *even though I'm not a great player*. As long as you are keeping with whatever standard of "acceptable" pace is for that course then who cares if you fall behind the group in front of you. If people behind you start pressing you, let them through if there's room, if not then let them know there's no room to play through. Truthfully, they should know if there's room to play through or not.

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My wife will fret at times about the group behind us.  I try to tell her to not worry about it, especially if we really have no where to go.  If it is a two some or fast three some we sometimes let them play through.  But if we are waiting, then no.

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When in playing alone I never worry about it because I'm a pretty fast pace player, but when I'm with partners who can't seem to get through their heads that you can't stand next to the green (or sit in your cart) while tallying up your score for the hole I get a little antsy.
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Quote:
If people behind you start pressing you, let them through if there's room

Excellent point.  I maintain that playing to the posted time is whats important, but that said if you are holding up a single or a double or someone fast, and you can let them through, you should.  Not only does it help them, it helps you.  Golf is hard enough without trying to focus on stuff other than hitting your shot.  Even though I'm a "good" player, I'm a slow player, especially around the greens.

Another thing I've noticed is that those who don't play by the rules tend to play much faster than everyone else.  If you don't re-tee/re-hit after you find a ball OB, you concede "gimmie" putts, etc... your going to play a whole lot faster than someone who doesn't do those things.  When I have a 3-4 footer, I go through my entire routine, reading the ball from both sides, just like I would on any other putt.  I would prefer to play a round in 4 1/2 to 5 hours, but if a course has a POP that's shorter, I fit into the POP.  Its extremely annoying to be accused of being "slow" by a group that takes putts inside the leather, drops on OB, drops where they are when they can't find a ball, takes foot wedges to save layup strokes, etc...

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