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Royster1984

The Flat-Stick And You

27 posts in this topic

I have been looking at alternative putting grips and techniques in a bid to improve my putting. I am averaging around 3-4 three putts per round, as well as this I am not really making many 6-10 ft putts.

I am using a standard right hand putter 35" long blade type. my grip is fairly standard with my index finger on each side of the putter grip pointing down the shaft. My misses are mostly pulls.

I was wondering if some of you more experienced players could shed some light on whats help your putting over the years and what changes/experiments you have tried to come to your current technique??

I am toying with the idea of going cack-handed for putting to help keep the line more often but I am open to other options.

Thanks

Anth

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Which of the "three keys" to great putting are you not doing?
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Which of the "three keys" to great putting are you not doing?

With regard to the link below, I guess it would be my stroke.

http://thesandtrap.com/b/playing_tips/three_keys_to_better_putting

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As someone who struggled with putting a lot during the beginning of my golf career, I have fiddled around with many putting techniques over the years. I have tried the Sergio Garcia "claw" grip, I have experimented with looking at the hole (as opposed to the ball) as I begin my stroke. I even played a half dozen rounds putting with one hand behind my back! At the end of the day, I have worked my way back to a traditional "palms inward" putting style, and I would classify my putting as satisfactory over the last few years.

I don't have a lot of specific advice for you, other than that it is my opinion that putting is such a personalized "feel" based part of the game that you should try and experiment as much as possible if you are dissatisfied with your putting stroke. If it looks strange but gives you confidence standing over the ball then have at it! You may find something that works well for you, only to change your technique 6 months later. That's ok. Eventually you will find something that you can stick with and you'll probably be more consistent than ever.

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With regard to the link below, I guess it would be my stroke.

http://thesandtrap.com/b/playing_tips/three_keys_to_better_putting

No, sorry, that's an old article written by who-knows-who.

Three keys that all great putters have:

  1. Read greens well (read)
  2. Start putts on intended line (bead)
  3. Control speed/distance (speed)
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No, sorry, that's an old article written by who-knows-who.

Three keys that all great putters have:

Read greens well (read)

Start putts on intended line (bead)

Control speed/distance (speed)

ah right sorry with regards to those 3 keys would say my weakest point is 2. start putts on intended line.

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Try a normal reverse overlap grip first. Assuming you are right handed, the four fingers of the right hand are on the club, and the left forefinger overlaps between your pinky and the next finger of your right hand. Just like a Vardon full swing grip except the left overlaps the right. Don't extend either forefinger down the shaft. The grip should be firm enough to hold a tube of toothpaste without dropping it, but not enough to squeeze any out. Don't slump too much, the knees lightly flexed and chest and knees squared parallel to the intended line. Outside of your feet about even with the outside of your shoulders or slightly more. Bend forward at the waist until your eyes are directly over the line. The above assumes the putter is about the correct length; your arms should hang comfortably neither bunched up nor stretched. Try all this first. There are as many variations from this as there are successful putters, but try the standard easy way first. Analyze your misses. On a level 10-12 ft putt, are you wide, long, or short? If you are wide, first check your eye position over the ball. You can't roll the ball on the line if you can't see it. If your eyes are not over the ball, your angle is distorted. There are basically 2 standard ways of swinging a putter; straight back and straight through, and back with the toe opening, then forward with the toe closing. Either way, the putter should be traveling square along the line when it strike the ball. Put down 3 tees in the practice green, one at the ball, one behind, and one ahead about an inch or 2 apart. Put three directly across just slightly wider than your putter head. place the ball between the middle tees off the sweet spot of your putter. Swing the putter back and through between the tees. You are making a little training trough. This helps you start the ball on line. I don't know any way to learn distance other than by practice. It is important that your stroke be consistent and rhythmic to have procuctive practice for distance, and the above excercise helps with that. Then put 3 balls at 15 feet and practice a rhythmic stroke that puts them six inches past the cup on a level putt. Then do the same at 20 feet, then move up to 10. Then put one ball at 10, then 20, then 15. Practice short 3-4 foot putts to a tee or dime instead of the hole. Next step, know the physics of green reading, but this post is already too long, LOL.
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I have been looking at alternative putting grips and techniques in a bid to improve my putting. I am averaging around 3-4 three putts per round, as well as this I am not really making many 6-10 ft putts.

I am using a standard right hand putter 35" long blade type. my grip is fairly standard with my index finger on each side of the putter grip pointing down the shaft. My misses are mostly pulls.

I was wondering if some of you more experienced players could shed some light on whats help your putting over the years and what changes/experiments you have tried to come to your current technique??

I am toying with the idea of going cack-handed for putting to help keep the line more often but I am open to other options.

Thanks

Anth

Long have you been playing, and how often do you play?   There is no substitute for repetition and learning to develop feel and touch on and around the greens.  Once you become a respectable putter, then you can fine tune with fat grips, different style putters or whatever......

What you need can't be bought in a store...IMO

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Try a normal reverse overlap grip first. Assuming you are right handed, the four fingers of the right hand are on the club, and the left forefinger overlaps between your pinky and the next finger of your right hand. Just like a Vardon full swing grip except the left overlaps the right. Don't extend either forefinger down the shaft. The grip should be firm enough to hold a tube of toothpaste without dropping it, but not enough to squeeze any out.

Don't slump too much, the knees lightly flexed and chest and knees squared parallel to the intended line. Outside of your feet about even with the outside of your shoulders or slightly more. Bend forward at the waist until your eyes are directly over the line.

The above assumes the putter is about the correct length; your arms should hang comfortably neither bunched up nor stretched.

Try all this first. There are as many variations from this as there are successful putters, but try the standard easy way first.

Analyze your misses. On a level 10-12 ft putt, are you wide, long, or short? If you are wide, first check your eye position over the ball. You can't roll the ball on the line if you can't see it. If your eyes are not over the ball, your angle is distorted.

There are basically 2 standard ways of swinging a putter; straight back and straight through, and back with the toe opening, then forward with the toe closing. Either way, the putter should be traveling square along the line when it strike the ball. Put down 3 tees in the practice green, one at the ball, one behind, and one ahead about an inch or 2 apart. Put three directly across just slightly wider than your putter head. place the ball between the middle tees off the sweet spot of your putter. Swing the putter back and through between the tees. You are making a little training trough. This helps you start the ball on line.

I don't know any way to learn distance other than by practice. It is important that your stroke be consistent and rhythmic to have procuctive practice for distance, and the above excercise helps with that. Then put 3 balls at 15 feet and practice a rhythmic stroke that puts them six inches past the cup on a level putt. Then do the same at 20 feet, then move up to 10. Then put one ball at 10, then 20, then 15. Practice short 3-4 foot putts to a tee or dime instead of the hole.

Next step, know the physics of green reading, but this post is already too long, LOL.

Will give the method you mention a try. As I mention in my other post my misses are normally left.

Long have you been playing, and how often do you play?   There is no substitute for repetition and learning to develop feel and touch on and around the greens.  Once you become a respectable putter, then you can fine tune with fat grips, different style putters or whatever......

What you need can't be bought in a store...IMO

I've been playing 14 months (bought first clubs April 2013), I normally play around 5-6 times a week at the minute.

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I've been playing 14 months (bought first clubs April 2013), I normally play around 5-6 times a week at the minute.

You are a golfing noob, so you are only experience what every golfer has early on......

The best thing you can do is play A LOT....and you are.  Your putting will definitely improve in leaps in bounds by the end of this year if you keep it up!!   I wish I can play that often!! LOL  Very nice!!

I'm an old working stiff, and I still manage to get out close to 4 times weekly on average.

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Try a normal reverse overlap grip first. Assuming you are right handed, the four fingers of the right hand are on the club, and the left forefinger overlaps between your pinky and the next finger of your right hand. Just like a Vardon full swing grip except the left overlaps the right.

Yeah, I've always wondered how many people never try this before they go on to all the goofy stuff you see the pros trying.  Of all of the "traditional" golf styles out there, I think the reverse overlap putting grip gets the least amount of press.  They never really talk about it, but they spend a lot of time highlighting the claw and braced forearm and the belly anchorer and the broomstick and the cross handed, etc, etc.  Maybe enough people just haven't tried, or perhaps don't even know about, the simple (and traditional) reverse overlap yet?

I am an oddball, though, and do extend the right forefinger down the shaft.  It works for me so I haven't found a reason to change it yet. :)

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You are a golfing noob, so you are only experience what every golfer has early on......

The best thing you can do is play A LOT....and you are.  Your putting will definitely improve in leaps in bounds by the end of this year if you keep it up!!   I wish I can play that often!! LOL  Very nice!!

I'm an old working stiff, and I still manage to get out close to 4 times weekly on average.

I've been very lucky with work, the project I am on contracted too have had me on standby with full pay for 11 months so I can play pretty much everyday unless wife wants me do something during the day.

Originally Posted by Golfingdad

I am an oddball, though, and do extend the right forefinger down the shaft.  It works for me so I haven't found a reason to change it yet. :)

I extend both forefingers down either side of the shaft as it feels natural to me :loco:

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Yeah, I've always wondered how many people never try this before they go on to all the goofy stuff you see the pros trying.  Of all of the "traditional" golf styles out there, I think the reverse overlap putting grip gets the least amount of press.  They never really talk about it, but they spend a lot of time highlighting the claw and braced forearm and the belly anchorer and the broomstick and the cross handed, etc, etc.  Maybe enough people just haven't tried, or perhaps don't even know about, the simple (and traditional) reverse overlap yet?

I am an oddball, though, and do extend the right forefinger down the shaft.  It works for me so I haven't found a reason to change it yet. :)

I use the reverse overlap. I find it's even better if you overlap the first AND second finger, unfortunately my ring gets in the way so I'm limited to one finger.

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Nice contract! Lucky guy for sure!

Yup :dance:

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Okay so let's not overthink this too much. You're having trouble starting putts on-line. Get two knitting needles and some elastic string. Make a line over your ball on the putting green. Hit balls that start straight up under the string. If you notice that you're pushing the ball try to hit them up the string. If you notice that you're pulling the ball, try to hit them up the string.
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Okay so let's not overthink this too much.

You're having trouble starting putts on-line. Get two knitting needles and some elastic string. Make a line over your ball on the putting green. Hit balls that start straight up under the string. If you notice that you're pushing the ball try to hit them up the string. If you notice that you're pulling the ball, try to hit them up the string.

What do you do if you find that you're hitting them backwards? :-P

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What do you do if you find that you're hitting them backwards? :-P

Quit.

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