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iacas

Help Me Design a Basement Putting Green

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3 minutes ago, 14ledo81 said:

I don't think you would even need to block when using the trailer jacks.  I think they would easily hold the weight.

I agree, the one shown is rated at 2000 pounds so X4 = 8000 pounds total,  How much does @iacas weigh???

 

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Okay, it sounds like you've decided to build some sort of box to elevate your putting surface and give yourself enough height for a cup.  But why don't you just cut a hole in the floor for the cup?  It really wouldn't be that big of a deal to cut down into the concrete (I presume there's concrete underneath that wood).  Having your putting surface the same level as your floor would make it more like usable space, rather than space dedicated solely to putting.  If you ever sold the house it would be easy to repair.  Just wondering...   :-P

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To keep it Simple i would just build the box out of wood then plywood and cover. Put a drawer between to of the joists and in that drawer keep (2ea) wooden blocks painted different colors to indicate sizes 1-5" .

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I've thought about making one of these using one of these in each corner:  http://www.amazon.com/uxcell-Furniture-Leveling-Adjuster-6mmx18mmx15mm/dp/B00BM2BRJ8

 

I've also considered just having a set of shims.  You'd only need 2, and you could place them on the same side to get left/right or even uphill/downhill.  You'd need 2 more to get both.  The nice part is that you'd only have to measure once--put the shims in until you get 1%, 2%, etc. and mark it.  Or a slight notch so that the edge sits into it without slipping. 

 

Sorry if this is a repeat, I haven't read every suggestion on here.

 

 

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Floor_panel.png

Here's a design possibility. . .

Use four 6 (up to 8 feet wide) foot by 4 foot panels cut from 3/4" thick plywood. The 4 foot edges are routed and reinforced with 2"x4" which are mitre cut 45 degrees. For wider panels a reinforcement bar or two made from 2"x4" down the middle along the width will likely be necessary. Two spread out the length possibly if there is a lot of use by heavy people.

Plates that are 4.5" from hole to hole centers are used to attach them. This will allow tilt between plates for multiple break simulation. The lengths need to be tuned so the carpet does not stretch and cause little "bumps" in the material from repeated movement up and down and side tilt configurations. Possibly just return the thing back to a straight putting configuration after use. You can also attach little mounted levels on every panel to aide in setting up configurations.

You can use 6 or 10 Trailer jacks to hold between the panels mounting them directly onto the connecting plates and the corners of the (which can be modified with the appropriate holes mounts for the jacks).

The parts would probably add up to about $200 without the trailer jacks. I like the ones that @bmartin461 presented, and these are $29 a piece http://www.lonewolftrailerco.com/Ram-Top-Wind-Swivel-Jack-2k/

http://www.amazon.com/Dean-Premium-Outdoor-Artificial-Putting/dp/B00FN589SC/ref=sr_1_6/183-5197771-4757465?ie=UTF8&qid=1460568759&sr=8-6&keywords=putting+green+carpet

 

Putting carpet is about $144 per 8 foot and this model would use 2 of them for $288.

Carpet glue is probably another $50.

Total project cost not including the carpet would be 290 + 200 + 288 + 50 + 50 (assorted HW) less than $1000.

The cost could be scaled down using your 12 foot x 7 foot carpet and knock off one panel for a project cost of $500 or so using only 8 trailer jacks. You would also cut the panels down to 4 by 7 feet for a 7 foot wide putting surface. :-)

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I dunno why y'all are talking about trailer jacks and shit. It's a plywood box, not a concrete slab. Should be able to lift the thing with one hand and slide a block underneath, no problem. 

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4 minutes ago, Ernest Jones said:

I dunno why y'all are talking about trailer jacks and shit. It's a plywood box, not a concrete slab. Should be able to lift the thing with one hand and slide a block underneath, no problem. 

I was just following the concept of adjustable tilt and break simulation. I can picture just turning the cranks to get the desired breaks.

A multiple break system would be nice, but I think at least 16 feet is desirable for that. Possibly 20 feet long?

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15 minutes ago, Ernest Jones said:

I dunno why y'all are talking about trailer jacks and shit. It's a plywood box, not a concrete slab. Should be able to lift the thing with one hand and slide a block underneath, no problem. 

Ernest - when dealing with OPM (other people's money) the sky is the limit.  Erik's old, we are looking out for his back.  :-O

 

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Actually, more panels would be nice so the breaks can be smoother. The sand box concept from @pumaAttack is great, but not really repeatable. I wonder if a simple and cheap method can be employed to do this?

 

2 minutes ago, bmartin461 said:

Ernest - when dealing with OPM (other people's money) the sky is the limit.  Erik's old, we are looking out for his back.  :-O

 

He's not that old. :-D

 

 

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Just now, bmartin461 said:

Ernest - when dealing with OPM (other people's money) the sky is the limit.  Erik's old, we are looking out for his back.  :-O

 

Well then, gold plated car jacks it is, with an attending retinue of eunuchs to do the cranking!

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4 minutes ago, bmartin461 said:

Ernest - when dealing with OPM (other people's money) the sky is the limit.  Erik's old, we are looking out for his back.  :-O

 

At what point does it become cheaper to just build a natural grass putting green....

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5 minutes ago, pumaAttack said:

At what point does it become cheaper to just build a natural grass putting green....

It wouldn't fit very well in a basement. In any case, you'd need lighting, proper irrigation and heaters for the long winter months up in Erie PA. I suppose building a greenhouse for such a purpose is possible, but might cost a little bit more than he is wanting to spend. . .

 

In retrospect, it might be possible to stack a whole bunch of 2"x6" pieces and sandwich them together so the transitions will be smoother. Leaf springs could be used to maintain the continuity while still using only 6 to 8 trailer jacks. (That's a lot of lumber, though).

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2 hours ago, 14ledo81 said:

I don't think you would even need to block when using the trailer jacks.  I think they would easily hold the weight.

No doubt.

But I'm thinking that depending on the length of the platform, it might sag under the weight of a person if it's only supported on the corners. And while you could use more jacks, having permanent jacks attached anywhere might not look good, would add cost to the project, etc. I'm thinking with ONE jack, you could lift the platform wherever you wanted to, then you block it and you're done.

I think jacks are a better way to go than leveling feet. The leveling feet work and are easy to obtain, but to actually physically alter the height with these would be a pain.  You'd still have to lift up the platform, then put your hand on the foot and turn it, etc.

I think what the OP wants is something simple and easy to do. He mentioned a child using it. Turning a crank on a jack is extremely easy to do. Whether it's permanently affixed jacks as you suggest, or a combination of a jack and other types of support, this is the easiest way to go I think.

36 minutes ago, Ernest Jones said:

I dunno why y'all are talking about trailer jacks and shit. It's a plywood box, not a concrete slab. Should be able to lift the thing with one hand and slide a block underneath, no problem. 

Yes and no. If he makes it sturdy enough that it supports the weight of people without any sagging, it might be heavier than you think, and not really "easy" to lift. And it might not be possible for a young child to lift it at all.

If it's flat on the floor, and you are just going to lift it, you have to bend down, grab it with your fingers....etc., There is the opportunity to drop it on your fingers or toes.

A jack is a great idea I think not because the power or leverage is needed so much, but because it simplifies the process. You fashion a very simple attachment for a trailer jack on each side of the platform. When you want to raise it, you go get the jack, slip it on, crank it a few times, and put the blocks underneath. Stow the jack away and you're done. No crushed fingers, no kneeling down to twist leveling feet, etc.

Ok I've spent WAY too much time on this.

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Guys, I'm not using jacks. They have leveling feet and if the screw is 5-6" long that may work beautifully. One in each corner and maybe one in the middle of the long side. Put a sheet of wood down beneath the feet to protect the floor.

That's the way I'm thinking right now. KISS. No car jacks. Not even any blocks.

12x7 wood or steel frames that need to support 250 pounds are heavy.

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21 minutes ago, Big Lex said:

Right. Which is why I think it would be a good idea to use a jack! :-)

Not as the permanent way of supporting the platform at slope, but to make it simpler (and more kid-friendly) to adjust the slope.

If you use those threaded leveling feet, you will have to get down on knees and somehow turn them to change the height.

Totally agree, this will become a pain and you will end up not doing it as often because of the time it takes.

Jacks are a good option and could look very clean, not sure why you don't want to consider them.  

I would look to crowd source this baby, make something we can all drool over.

Something that  you could mount "inside" you frame, most of it becomes hidden under the plywood then, super simple adjusting.

image_26340.jpg

 

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16 minutes ago, iacas said:

I'm not THAT weak and I'm not using a jack. The 8x8 solid wood one wasn't that heavy.

It's not a matter of begin weak, it comes down to function.  Put level down, crank three times, boom, 3 degree slant.

I could take the wheels off my pull cart and drag my bag around the course, I'm physically strong enough, but would I every day?

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