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dave s

Do you place the ball on the tee a specific way each time you tee it up?

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  1. 1. Do you tee up the ball a certain way every time?

    • Yes
      14
    • No
      19

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27 posts in this topic

I have to place the ball on the tee with the directional arrow pointing forward toward the target and at approximately a 45 degree up angle.  Gives me the mental thought of launching the ball properly with the driver.

As this may sound strange, MOST of us place the ball on the tee in a consistent manner each time we tee the ball.  Some like to smack it right where it says Titleist.  Others point the logo toward them and hit only the 'clean side' of the ball.

You know you do this.  Explain your weirdness and let's hear some funny stuff.

dave

ps:  spring and golf season can't come soon enough!

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I mark my balls with a red dot so I always tee up with the red dot facing straight up. It's more of a visual cue than anything.

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I used to tee the ball up where I couldn't see any logos or anything, just the plain white of the ball. However, I think I've gotten out of that the last couple of years. Last season I don't remember consciously lining it up any particular way.

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Heck no. I only know one person who aligns his ball on the tee. He's slow as death and admits to having so many different voices yelling at him inside his head that he can't stand it. I put the ball on the tee and hit it.
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Heck no.

I only know one person who aligns his ball on the tee. He's slow as death and admits to having so many different voices yelling at him inside his head that he can't stand it.

I put the ball on the tee and hit it.

I think I know that guy. :loco:

He drove us nuts all last summer and gets picked last in every choose up game (and doesn't even know it).

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I think I know that guy. :loco: He drove us nuts all last summer and gets picked last in every choose up game (and doesn't even know it).

We've actually timed him on the tee box. Over one full minute from put the peg in the ground to pulling the trigger. Ugh....!

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I just avoid having the line on top.  I pay more attention to the height vs. my club head.

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I hit the ball right on the Titleist logo. When I was a little kid, some old guy said the ball was meant to be hit on the logo because it would cause less side spin. I was a stupid little kid and believed him, but I still do it to this day.

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I always place the ball on the tee such that there are no line, logos,marks, etc. showing.  I like to just see the ball.

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I voted no. I generally like to see mostly white, but I'm not that picky about it, and don't really care if I forget now and then.

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For the most part, I just put it on the tee and hit it. But every once in a while, the logo or line will distract me and I'll move the ball to where I can't see it anymore. I do make sure that if I've marked the ball with a marker, the mark isn't facing towards the club. I don't want to transfer red permanent ink onto the face of my driver.

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Anyone who does should be checked for OCD. :-P
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Anyone who does should be checked for OCD.

Or CDO, which is basically the same thing, just with the letters listed alphabetically, as they should be. :-D

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For the most part, I just put it on the tee and hit it. But every once in a while, the logo or line will distract me and I'll move the ball to where I can't see it anymore. I do make sure that if I've marked the ball with a marker, the mark isn't facing towards the club. I don't want to transfer red permanent ink onto the face of my driver.

I'm the same, it's not that I'm too concerned about getting ink of the club face, it's where exactly it goes on the club-face that would bother me :-D

The sweat spot would be ink free :8)

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I personally dont but I do know some people who are diehard Titleist guys and always tee up their ball with the Pro V1 logo up because they claim it makes them feel more confident knowing they are playing what they claim is the best ball in golf.  I always kind of laugh and roll my eyes at that but hey, whatever works.

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Specific not like I have an aiming line or set of dots that need to be exactly somewhere.  I just always tee up the ball so it's just white showing on top.  I do that on the putting green too.  Though it's pretty much just superstition, cause I've never found any distraction from being able to see logo or numbers or whatever on the ball between the tee and the green.

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I'm the same, it's not that I'm too concerned about getting ink of the club face, it's where exactly it goes on the club-face that would bother me

The sweat spot would be ink free


^^^There it is. One day I was playing with my son and toward the end of the day he showed me the face of his driver. All of the marks were right on top of each other and right on the sweet spot.

I looked at mine (and I had actually played fairly well that day) and the marks were everywhere on the face except the sweet spot. I told him my club would have more resale value because it has rarely been hit on the sweet spot.

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