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mooseontheloose

Time for First Fitted Irons - Am I on target based on my skill level?

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Started in July 2017 with some used Burner 1.0s (stock everything as far as I can tell). Don't have a handicap, but shooting in the 90s mostly near end of last season, with a bunch in the low 90s near the end (including a 90). Courses are usually around 120-125 slope. Excited to break into the 80s.

This winter I invested in an off-season practice/lesson plan that includes a handful of lessons and unlimited supervised practice (not GOLFTEC). About 6 weeks in and already I'm making measurable progress. Swing is consistently in-out now rather than out-in and although my swing speed is roughly the same as before (but perhaps more consistent), I've added ~10 yards to be 7i carry. For reference, my SS with a 7 averages about 87 but can push it to 90 at times. Club is I believe 31 loft, new carry is just over 170 yards average. Might even add a few more yards when I'm more consistent with my launch (used to launch it too high because of poor impact position). Anyway sorry for the ramble, but thought I'd provide context.

Even before this winter my irons were the better (consistent) part of my game. I'm really confident that that will be even truer come spring. I'd plan to get fit for new irons around March, since I assume my current ones are limiting me at least a bit (regular shafts for example). 

I've hit a few at a big box store (different shafts too) and really like the JPX 919 Forged. Also looking at P790s. My fitter will be a Titleist guy so I'll get the hit AP3s again (and AP1/2) but I'm put off by the strong lofts in the shorter clubs. 

Given what I've described above regarding my game/progress, is it reasonable to be looking at these irons? I like the smaller head size and softer feel, and figure I can get more out of them as my game continues to improve. But I also don't want to move too quick if I'd be better served by strict GI irons. I'm making good progress regarding hitting out of the middle more often right now, but obviously I'm far from perfect. 

Like I said, my fitter will be a Titleist guy (part of my winter program) so he'll help me nail down my actual specs (and an idea about shaft hopefully) but if I choose not to go with Titleist I'll have to go hit a few elsewhere to decide. Basically trying to get an idea of a proper shortlist.

Am I on the right track with 919F/P790s? Any others in that same category to recommend? Or am I off-base?

Sorry for long post. Thanks!

Edited by mooseontheloose

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8 hours ago, mooseontheloose said:

Started in July 2017 with some used Burner 1.0s (stock everything as far as I can tell). Don't have a handicap, but shooting in the 90s mostly near end of last season, with a bunch in the low 90s near the end (including a 90). Courses are usually around 120-125 slope. Excited to break into the 80s.

This winter I invested in an off-season practice/lesson plan that includes a handful of lessons and unlimited supervised practice (not GOLFTEC). About 6 weeks in and already I'm making measurable progress. Swing is consistently in-out now rather than out-in and although my swing speed is roughly the same as before (but perhaps more consistent), I've added ~10 yards to be 7i carry. For reference, my SS with a 7 averages about 87 but can push it to 90 at times. Club is I believe 31 loft, new carry is just over 170 yards average. Might even add a few more yards when I'm more consistent with my launch (used to launch it too high because of poor impact position). Anyway sorry for the ramble, but thought I'd provide context.

Even before this winter my irons were the better (consistent) part of my game. I'm really confident that that will be even truer come spring. I'd plan to get fit for new irons around March, since I assume my current ones are limiting me at least a bit (regular shafts for example). 

I've hit a few at a big box store (different shafts too) and really like the JPX 919 Forged. Also looking at P790s. My fitter will be a Titleist guy so I'll get the hit AP3s again (and AP1/2) but I'm put off by the strong lofts in the shorter clubs. 

Given what I've described above regarding my game/progress, is it reasonable to be looking at these irons? I like the smaller head size and softer feel, and figure I can get more out of them as my game continues to improve. But I also don't want to move too quick if I'd be better served by strict GI irons. I'm making good progress regarding hitting out of the middle more often right now, but obviously I'm far from perfect. 

Like I said, my fitter will be a Titleist guy (part of my winter program) so he'll help me nail down my actual specs (and an idea about shaft hopefully) but if I choose not to go with Titleist I'll have to go hit a few elsewhere to decide. Basically trying to get an idea of a proper shortlist.

Am I on the right track with 919F/P790s? Any others in that same category to recommend? Or am I off-base?

Sorry for long post. Thanks!

Keep gathering information. Titleist is a good brand, as is Mizuno, but there are others. I would recommend hitting other irons to get a feel for them and how they look to you at address. The JPX line will feel different than Mizuno's MP line. Titleist AP3 feels different than AP1 and AP2 and look different at address. Callaway, Taylormade etc all have a variety of looks and feels in both their Game Improvement line and Players level irons.

Take your time in other words. You don't want buyer's remorse. 

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If you are getting fit go to a location that does not have a brand bias. You want to be able to hit multiple brands and focus on the numbers. A club that looks great but doesn't function well is a vanity item. How the club looks to you can be a final factor but you will learn to love a club with a fat topline and weird offset if you hit it  consistently and score well. It will "feel right" if the ball goes where you want.

If that club is Mizuno, Titleist, Srixon.... OK if PGX is out of your budget then let the fitter know. If your fitting is about anything other than performance then it is about Vanity and you should just buy what fits your image and move on.

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Depends on what you are looking for. If you want a more traditional looking club, I would go with Srixon or Mizuno. If you want to sacrifice a bit of feel for forgiveness then the blade looking Pings or the JPX series from Mizuno are really good. You could look into the Cobra line.

 

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11 hours ago, mooseontheloose said:

My fitter will be a Titleist guy so I'll get the hit AP3s again (and AP1/2) but I'm put off by the strong lofts in the shorter clubs. 

FWIW, there is only a 1-2 degree difference between the AP3 lofts in the 9 (39 degrees and PW (43 degrees) and the P790 9 iron (40 degrees) and PW (45 degrees)

IMO, you should be looking at the club range that is a step up from the GI clubs, but not quite the full on blade clubs. Now that you are getting better and making progress, distance control will become important to you, and some of the GI clubs are known for being hard to control distance on, with random hits that send the ball an extra 10 yards, something you dont really need when your current 7 iron goes 170, which is a very respectable 7 iron distance.

I think the P790 might be ok for you, but you also might find it a bit too hot, consider the P760 as well, you might have a little better distance control with the P760s.

Like others have said, even though the fitter is a titleist guy, please try out as many brands as possible and dont limit yourself to just 1-2 models or brands.

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I bought a new set of irons last year and my approach was hitting literally every set that was in my price range. I then narrowed to a few options and compared those head to head. Overall I am pretty satisfied with my purchase and plan to keep with that approach for any new clubs I buy.

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Unless you are in a real hurry, I would try as many irons as possible.  When I went through the process, it was winter in NJ - no golf being played - I must have gone to one of the big golf stores 15 times and hit well over 10 different clubs before deciding which was best for me.  All of the clubs you mentioned are going to be good clubs - I would make sure that you also try some GI clubs as I am a big fan of more over less forgiveness.  When I went through the process I was about a 10 handicap and thought I wanted irons closer to players' irons (but not players irons) than GI, but the results of the GI were just too good to ignore.  Just one person's experience.

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I was/am in the exact situation as you. I decided to get fit for a new set of irons, and it was absolutely the right decision. I tried AP1, AP3, Srixon 585, Ping i210, i500, G400, P790, and Callaway Rogue and Rogue Pro. When I went in I was pretty set on AP3 or P790. When the fitting was complete, I walked out with Ping G400s and I couldn't be happier. 

 

My recommendation is to definitely get fit and pick the clubs which give the best result regardless of make/model.

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