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MattyMFC

Putting advice

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Can anyone provide any putting tips and/or videos?! I literally need everything here; correct grip, correct stance, correct ball position. I've been playing since last July and I've always overlooked putting practice in with the putter in favour of practicing with other clubs. I played my round yesterday and I could of easily got a PB and maybe broken 100 for the first time, but for the amount of 3-putts I made. It's suddenly dawned on me, this will be the only club I'll ever use on EVERY hole. I would greatly appreciate any information. Cheers.
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I literally need everything here; correct grip, correct stance, correct ball position.

First, the bad news: you aren't going to find these, because there isn't even consensus among the top golfers in the world on [i]which hand goes on top[/i], even among players of the same dexterity. But that's also the good news: if there isn't consensus among the best players in the world on this, then it can't really be that fundamental. [quote name="MattyMFC" url="/t/73237/putting-advice#post_963530"]It's suddenly dawned on me, this will be the only club I'll ever use on EVERY hole. I would greatly appreciate any information. [/quote] I've had holes where I didn't use my putter; I think Mike Weir once went something like 14 consecutive holes (at a major even) without using a putter. Of course, that's because he broke his. And my lack of putter usage was the occasional chip-in (or a concession in match play). So... don't take the above to mean not to practice your putting. If you played well enough that your three-putts kept you from a personal best, then maybe your putting is a weakness you need to address. Just don't fall into the trap of thinking that putting needs to be a majority of your practice time -- especially after you get rid of this weakness. There are many ways to get a lot of three putts. Were you missing short ones (three feet and in)? If so, I'd suggest practicing those. It's best if you can find some straight three-footers on your course's practice green. If you can make a lot of those, then it's a sign that your stroke isn't the issue. Which brings me to the longer putts: are you mis-reading them or hitting them the wrong speed? That is, if you [i]aren't[/i] leaving yourself 3-5 feet for your second putt, is it because you leave it very short (or send it very far past), or because you hit it about the right speed, but it takes off in a direction other than you anticipated?

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Great reply Shindig, thank you. My 3-foot putts aren't really an issue. I holed 90% or so yesterday, the only one I can think of which I didn't hole is when I rushed & I was trying not to stand on someone else's line. It's certainly my long putts. I don't get them close enough to knock it in on the second attempt. I have no consistency, I was hitting them too firmly and running way past the hole early in my round, then I over compensated and I was far too short every time. That being said my line wasn't always that great.
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Okay. First, don't rush a putt -- if it isn't literally a tap-in, there's no shame in marking and waiting. Rushing a shot usually adds to the time for the round anyway. And on other than a tap-in, try to not hit it if you can't take your stance. Second... well, this seems like a good thing to practice. Start with speed -- find a relatively flat part of your green, and put markers at 10, 15, 20 feet. Try to hit some consistent putts of about that distance. Then repeat with uphill / downhill. As for green reading... see if there's an AimPoint class near you. Even just approximating their technique helped me get better, and I'm going to spend some time in the near future trying to follow their teachings more closely.
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Okay. First, don't rush a putt -- if it isn't literally a tap-in, there's no shame in marking and waiting. Rushing a shot usually adds to the time for the round anyway. And on other than a tap-in, try to not hit it if you can't take your stance.

Second... well, this seems like a good thing to practice. Start with speed -- find a relatively flat part of your green, and put markers at 10, 15, 20 feet. Try to hit some consistent putts of about that distance. Then repeat with uphill / downhill.

As for green reading... see if there's an AimPoint class near you. Even just approximating their technique helped me get better, and I'm going to spend some time in the near future trying to follow their teachings more closely.

Yeah, this is a great way to practice. Also work on getting your tempo/rhythm the same for every putt, regardless of distance. I saw a tip on GC (forget which teacher) where he said to say "one thousand one" as you putt. Definitely helps to putt consistently and also helps you to relax a little. Good lag putting from longer distances just takes practice.

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I'd say get fitted for a putter (unless you already have). Its by far the best $ I've ever spent on golf. I had no idea why some people use mallet some use blades ect..... Its the most important club in your bag and its good to know you are using the proper one. I was a terrible putter before I got fitted and now I'm looking to make everything inside of 20 ft.
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Can anyone provide any putting tips and/or videos?!

I literally need everything here; correct grip, correct stance, correct ball position.

I've been playing since last July and I've always overlooked putting practice in with the putter in favour of practicing with other clubs.

I played my round yesterday and I could of easily got a PB and maybe broken 100 for the first time, but for the amount of 3-putts I made.

It's suddenly dawned on me, this will be the only club I'll ever use on EVERY hole. I would greatly appreciate any information.

Cheers.

Hard to say with out seeing your putting stroke. I prefer the ball slightly forward than most so your hitting up a tad on the ball. This helps for a more consistent strike and roll. As for stance, I like a pretty neutral set up. Not too wide stance. Not too bent over or too upright. I like to feel comfortable. I would say make sure your eyes are line up either on the line of the putt, or just inside the ball. You don't want to be past the ball or have your eyes over your toes. Easy way is to carry a 2nd ball. Set up to the putt, and then hold the ball under your eye and let it drop. Were it lands can tell you were your eyes are set up.

As for some putting help. All great putters do 3 things.

They read putts well, they start putts on the line they want, and they have distance control. First two can be learned. Last one takes practice and proper fitting.

If you want to start your ball online. I would find a straight putt on a practice green. Lay down an alignment stick or a 3-4 foot long dowel on the ground. At the one end set up a gate using two golf balls, or two tees. I would make the gate slightly larger than the golf ball your putting with.

---------------------------------------------------------

O

O

O

----------------------------------------------------------

So basically this set up. The dashed line is the alignment stick. The two "O" are the gate, and the one "O", is the golf ball. Now hit putts so the ball doesn't strike the gate. You basically want to learn how to start your line down a straight line. You can lay down another dowel on the bottom side to help line up to.

Just putt till you can start the ball where you want it to go.

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@MattyMFC ,

I would recommend these books.  They really helped me.  They are easy reads.

by Stan Utley

by Dave Stockton

And finally AimPoint for reading putts.  There is no better method to read putts than AimPoint.

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My putting advice would be to simply try to get the ball close. People are too obsessed over trying to make everything. When you have a 3 footer obviously you would want to make it, but don't make a big deal out of it if you miss. Make your bogey and move on. The technique is simple as well. you take it back, and hit it. If you give it some thought its actually quite silly to think about how to roll a ball on the ground with a stick from a technical mindset. Your stroke is fine if you can hit the ball. My putting method is simple, get it close, if you miss tap in.

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Your stroke is fine if you can hit the ball.

I probably couldn't disagree more. My kid could "hit the ball" when she was three… but her putting stroke was not "fine." And we've seen (and fixed) all manner of putting strokes.

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My putting advice would be to simply try to get the ball close. People are too obsessed over trying to make everything. When you have a 3 footer obviously you would want to make it, but don't make a big deal out of it if you miss. Make your bogey and move on. The technique is simple as well. you take it back, and hit it. If you give it some thought its actually quite silly to think about how to roll a ball on the ground with a stick from a technical mindset. Your stroke is fine if you can hit the ball. My putting method is simple, get it close, if you miss tap in.

Well there is one phrase in that paragraph that I would agree with. Nothing you can do about it then.

The rest is a head scratcher to me.

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@MattyMFC , I would recommend these books.  They really helped me.  They are easy reads.  [CONTENTEMBED=/products/the-art-of-putting layout=inline]​[/CONTENTEMBED]  by Stan Utley  [CONTENTEMBED=/products/unconscious-putting-dave-stocktons-guide-to-unlocking-your-signature-stroke layout=inline]​[/CONTENTEMBED]  by Dave Stockton And finally AimPoint for reading putts.  There is no better method to read putts than AimPoint.

I've just googled AimPoint & I don't think there is anywhere nearby in the NE of England to learn. How reliable is this theory? From what I've just read online it just leads to slow play on greens and many people disagree with the use of it .

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I've just googled AimPoint & I don't think there is anywhere nearby in the NE of England to learn.

How reliable is this theory? From what I've just read online it just leads to slow play on greens and many people disagree with the use of it .


I wish some of my friends would learn it so I could see first hand how much they improved.

I consider myself a better than average putter when it comes to mechanics and when I miss a "makeable" putt it's almost always due to a misread (so I wouldn't mind at all having a more foolproof method of reading a green).

I don't like math (especially today, after just completing my income tax returns) so if it's very complicated I probably wouldn't like it.

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I've just googled AimPoint & I don't think there is anywhere nearby in the NE of England to learn.

How reliable is this theory? From what I've just read online it just leads to slow play on greens and many people disagree with the use of it .

Search more on this forum and you will learn that it doesn't slow down play. What slows down play is people who are not willing to put in the time to learn it and then try to relearn it on the course. Like any resource you can become efficient with it. I've seen @iacas use it on the course before and he takes less time than a most golfers putting who will read a normal putt.

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My putting advice would be to simply try to get the ball close. People are too obsessed over trying to make everything. When you have a 3 footer obviously you would want to make it, but don't make a big deal out of it if you miss. Make your bogey and move on. The technique is simple as well. you take it back, and hit it. If you give it some thought its actually quite silly to think about how to roll a ball on the ground with a stick from a technical mindset. Your stroke is fine if you can hit the ball. My putting method is simple, get it close, if you miss tap in.

Really?  My daughter could "hit" the ball at 3 years old....

Damn.  Edited to add that Erik already posted the same point, almost verbatim.

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I've just googled AimPoint & I don't think there is anywhere nearby in the NE of England to learn.

How reliable is this theory? From what I've just read online it just leads to slow play on greens and many people disagree with the use of it .

@MattyMFC ,

What makes slower play is three putts and the guy who has to walk on all sides to read his putt because they see the Pros do it that way.  AimPoint is faster IMO than the traditional way to read putts.  I don't go behind to hole to read, then behind the ball to read.  My whole read takes 10 to 15 seconds.  Most putts I get the read before my partners are even near their ball.  I get the read, mark my ball and wait for them if they are away.  I stand behind my ball when they are putting and pick my line.  When its my turn, I walk up, align my putter, take my stance, then putt.  I don't take practice strokes near the ball.

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First, the bad news: you aren't going to find these, because there isn't even consensus among the top golfers in the world on [i]which hand goes on top[/i], even among players of the same dexterity. But that's also the good news: if there isn't consensus among the best players in the world on this, then it can't really be that fundamental. I've had holes where I didn't use my putter; I think Mike Weir once went something like 14 consecutive holes (at a major even) without using a putter. Of course, that's because he broke his. And my lack of putter usage was the occasional chip-in (or a concession in match play). So... don't take the above to mean not to practice your putting. If you played well enough that your three-putts kept you from a personal best, then maybe your putting is a weakness you need to address. Just don't fall into the trap of thinking that putting needs to be a majority of your practice time -- especially after you get rid of this weakness. There are many ways to get a lot of three putts. Were you missing short ones (three feet and in)? If so, I'd suggest practicing those. It's best if you can find some straight three-footers on your course's practice green. If you can make a lot of those, then it's a sign that your stroke isn't the issue. Which brings me to the longer putts: are you mis-reading them or hitting them the wrong speed? That is, if you [i]aren't[/i] leaving yourself 3-5 feet for your second putt, is it because you leave it very short (or send it very far past), or because you hit it about the right speed, but it takes off in a direction other than you anticipated?

Yes agree Sometimes what I do if the putting gets to complicated is to start putting with those bullseye putter without any funny neck and straight shaft down the middle. After a few stroke it may clarify how to putt again.

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Can anyone provide any putting tips and/or videos?!

I literally need everything here; correct grip, correct stance, correct ball position.

I've been playing since last July and I've always overlooked putting practice in with the putter in favour of practicing with other clubs.

I played my round yesterday and I could of easily got a PB and maybe broken 100 for the first time, but for the amount of 3-putts I made.

It's suddenly dawned on me, this will be the only club I'll ever use on EVERY hole. I would greatly appreciate any information.

Cheers.

I know golfers who spend hours and hours practising putting and still look silly on the greens and I know others who think putting doesn't need to be practised and they have amazing putting stats.

I'm one of the silly ones. I have overanalysied the putt and believe my head is full of too many details (break, grain, speed, technique, positive thoughts, negative thoughts, visualisation, Zanzo, holding my breath, etc) and I could use someone who could brainwash all these things out of my mind when I putt.

I would definitely have a handicap of 2 if I could putt like my partner who just walks up to the ball takes his position and lets go. Oh if I could have that freedom!

My advice: Just enjoy putting, its the easiest dynamic in the game and apart from the pros, it really isn't going to change your life if you miss. My partner always says,

"Your friends, family and pets don't care how good or bad you putt."

I should really take a bit of my own advice but there's just too much interference clanging around in my head. I'm really just a lost cause.

On a happier note, The rest of my game is top notch and I love it. I'm with Hogan, or was it Snead, a putt should count as half a stroke.

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