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Shotshapeaholics

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

My name is Clark, and I am a shot-shapeahholic.

 

I used to think Johnny Miller was a 1st class d-bag when he talked about baby cuts and powerfades and going draws.  I used to think "who cares, he hit the green!"

 

Now, I care too much.  It has overcome me.  It's not enough to hit a green in reg, it needs to come in with the proper shape. I want to cut it off the bunker.  I need to draw it into the flag.

 

ok, I kid...I am not completely obsessed, but it has become something I think about so much more than I ever thought I would. I am not good enough to care, right?

 

 Is this good, bad or indifferent...in your opinion?

 

 

post #2 of 19

If you can shape shots reliably it gives you an extra tool in your arsenal.

 

If you're inconsistent with shot shaping it just causes more issues.

post #3 of 19

my opinon doesn't mean shit, but since you asked....................i thin its good to have spot specific expecttions, but don't kill yourself over it, not that its easy not to obsesss over, I would know, I have OCD

post #4 of 19

If you can do it with consistency it's great but imo most people can't consistently shape shots and they end up costing themselves shots. I think that it causes people to over think on shots that they can't actually hit. 

post #5 of 19

I got an unofficial free golf lesson from a scratch golfer today at the course where I played today. He helped me completely change my swing and I also discovered that my natural ball flight is not straight but a baby cut. He also helped me develop a baby draw. Immediately I envisioned me cutting balls in to green and drawing them over trees so I understand where your coming from. I guess we need a type of shot shaping AAd2_doh.gif

post #6 of 19

i prefer to hit 1 type of shape majority of the time, a draw, but i will shape it the other way if a hole really demands it. like if there is a dog leg right, were i know being on the right side will give me a good advantage. Or when i want to play away from water. Other than that, i just like to play a draw. I hit a high ball, so i really never get bothered by up front bunkers, were i might have to take it around one. 

post #7 of 19

I'm pretty happy when I hit it straight but have played a few courses where being able to shape your shot into the green would be helpful.   Shot shaping is a 2013 goal. 

post #8 of 19

I think working the ball makes the game EASIER...if you can start it at a certain point, it gives you a larger acceptable range of outcomes for the shot. If there's a bunker left and a pin to the right, I know if I start it at the left bunker towards the flag and I miss 10 yards left of where I wanted it...it's in the middle of the green. Conversely, that same shot that misses 10 yards left, if I'd played towards the middle of the green with a straight flight, might be in that bunker.

 

I draw the ball reliably, and will fight a double cross with a cut because a ball is my more natural ballflight. But, I am probably thinking about 'moving' 85% or more of my shots because, frankly, I feel like it makes the game EASIER for me.

post #9 of 19

Well for me, why make the game tougher. If a course has alot of fade shots, then i will fade more, but if i am given a draw shot, i will take it gladly. Take what the course gives you. Its helped my game. 

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by namkrats View Post

I got an unofficial free golf lesson from a scratch golfer today at the course where I played today.

He helped me completely change my swing and I also discovered that my natural ball flight is not straight but a baby cut.

He also helped me develop a baby draw. Immediately I envisioned me cutting balls in to green and drawing them over trees so I understand where your coming from. I guess we need a type of shot shaping AAd2_doh.gif


All in one day!!!!!! Wow!!!!!!

Ain't it great how the word slice has been replaced with "baby cut".

 

That's internet golf for you!!

post #11 of 19

Shaping the shot and trajectory are surely part of a refined game, and these shot qualities are part of the real difference in a great game versus just a good game.  The shape of the green and pin position dictate the shape and trajectory one should try to command, and the reason is your good shots will be really good and your misses will be pretty good and leave par a real chance. 

 

Consider a narrow green that is angled so the left front is closer and the right back is angled about 45 degrees deeper.  Then put a water hazard in front (think about 12 at Augusta, ) and a trap along the back.  Unless the pin is front left, the best approach is almost always a cut shot, moving left to right.  Aim a little left of the pin and if you hit it straight, you hit the green, if you hit a slight draw, you are not wet, and if you make the shot, you have a birdie possibility from pretty close.  A cut tends to track down the center line of the green.   A draw risks too much.  The distance must be perfect, push it and you are in the water or over draw it the ball goes in the trap.  Draws run out a little further in general.  So pick a club that will get the ball on the green with a normal cut and hit with confidence... a little miss will not hurt you.

 

The opposite situation can be in play just as easily, depending on angle of the green, taps and hazards, and preferred landing areas.  A deep left pin usually begs for a little draw back into the pin.

 

But the real reason you need to know both shot shapes is when you are choking or a little off your game.  You can hit a shot that moves away from the trouble that could make a big number. 

 

I love greens that are designed to make you consider your options and play the optimal shot to improve your chances.  To me that is the most enjoyable part of golf -- the chess match between the designer, the pin placement of the day, and the golfer.

post #12 of 19

I think if you can do it with consistency, great! I know im not good enough at this point to even think about that. Once I become a consistent golfer and can break into the high 70's then Ill look at refining that part of my game. But right now shotting in the 80's I still have other aspects of the game I need to improve upon before I start worrying about those kind of shots.

post #13 of 19

shaping shots is fun...its not something I'm thinking about the whole round but I do it often.  My favorite would probably be a high draw with my mid irons..I think it just looks pretty flying through the air.

post #14 of 19

Depends on your intentions.

 

Being able to the hit the ball different ways is, of course, a huge plus.

 

But falling in love with it may not be. Most shots call for an ideal ball flight - a fade into a back-right pin & so on. And as long as that's the shot you're trying to to execute, great. If you're trying to get cute or trying to score style points, knock it off. There's no Russian judges in this game. A par is a par no matter how you do it.

 

Remember what the goal of the game is - fewest strokes possible.

post #15 of 19

Master one shot.  Once you can consistently hit good shots with one shape then work on another.  But don't try to work everything if you aren't hitting solid shots in the first place.

post #16 of 19

Logic tells me that we (non tour pros) would shoot lower scores if we would just pick out the line that allows us to hit the shot we're most comfortable with, even if it means we can't go at the flag (or even at the green in some cases).

 

However, my family's well-being isn't dependent on my golf score.  I play golf in part because I want to do well at something that's pretty damn hard, and because it allows you to analyze, plan, and execute, and provides you with immediate feedback on your results.  It's that part of the game that pushes me to try to hit a perfect shot many times, when a good shot (or even an average one) aimed differently would likely produce better results.

 

I like hitting cuts and draws on purpose.  I like sliding a ball into a tucked pin.  I really like bending a ball 30 yards or so when my playing partners think I'm blocked out.  I used to try to do this on almost every shot.  I've started to get better about hitting a shot that I know I can execute when the "perfect" shot would be unnecessarily risky.

 

I'll use one of my success stories as an example.  A course I play regularly has a 460-yard par-4 that doglegs right and has a creek and trees that run the entire right side, and a wind hurting from the right.  The "perfect" tee shot is a driver that fades against the wind and carries the corner of the creek, but I have a hard time hitting a controlled cut against a hurting wind--more often than not I'll leave it right in the creek or hook it OB left.  The last two times I hit a draw 3-wood (a nearly automatic shot for me) instead to the fat part of the fairway, but further from the hole.  Both times I hit the fairway, and then hit the middle of the green with a solid long iron.  Par is nearly a full shot below my average score on that hole over 10 rounds.  That's an immediate, measurable improvement just from replacing one risky shot that I should be able to pull off (but seldom do) with one that I know I can easily execute.

post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by clarkgriswold View Post

My name is Clark, and I am a shot-shapeahholic.

 

I used to think Johnny Miller was a 1st class d-bag when he talked about baby cuts and powerfades and going draws.  I used to think "who cares, he hit the green!"

 

Now, I care too much.  It has overcome me.  It's not enough to hit a green in reg, it needs to come in with the proper shape. I want to cut it off the bunker.  I need to draw it into the flag.

 

ok, I kid...I am not completely obsessed, but it has become something I think about so much more than I ever thought I would. I am not good enough to care, right?

 

 Is this good, bad or indifferent...in your opinion?

 

 



I don't think that it's necessarily a bad thing to think about.  Certain shots call for a certain shape and if you are able to hit it then that is great.  Furthermore, I think that it's good to go up to each shot and have a plan.

 

I remember a while back I was playing with my wife and I was telling her each shot I was going to hit and how (i.e. cut it off the bunker or whatever) and honestly it was one of the best rounds I had.  The reason why, for me at least, was that it was making me think more about what I was going to do, and then telling her what I was doing made me realize some bad decisions as well.  My point is though, if you start thinking about things like this you'll be more aware of what you are doing and possibly make less mistakes and score better.  Also, if you shape your shots properly and make the right decisions you'll have an easier time getting up and down or otherwise recovering from mistakes when you do miss.

post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by tristanhilton85 View Post

I remember a while back I was playing with my wife and I was telling her each shot I was going to hit and how (i.e. cut it off the bunker or whatever) and honestly it was one of the best rounds I had.


This works.  When I'm really focused and playing well, I will whisper out loud right before I hit the shot:  "High draw, start at the Cook pine.  Hit it solid, not hard."  Or something like that.  It works.  It gets your mind focused and forces you to visualize the exact shot you want to hit.  I frequently get lazy and don't do this, but it's amazing how a little discipline can really produce results if it keeps you focused.

 

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