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hoselpalooza

Who Pushes Off With Their Trail Leg?

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45 minutes ago, mvmac said:

Great post @iacas

Just filmed this to show what a "push" would be.

 

I'm afraid we're gonna get a response from @hoselpalooza that will disappoint. So just to prepare for it I'll take a gander at what he'll write:

That video doesn't prove anything. I've shown multiple videos and cited experts that you've yet  been able to disprove. You're clearly wrong on this matter.

BTW, great video Mike.

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9 hours ago, mvmac said:

Just filmed this to show what a "push" would be.

Great video! Thanks for going into more detail about what is going on in a golf swing.

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At the end of the day:

  • The trail leg and ankle (and foot) aren't shown to be doing anything actively. The trail knee, hip, and ankle all gain flexion, which is the opposite of "pushing."
  • What small push "forces" are seen at the trail foot are simply a matter of the trail foot being the point of contact with the ground. The forces originate from other parts of the body, and are transmitted via that contact point. Magically replacing the trail leg with a pole at the end of the backswing would produce similar forces (actually higher forces since the pole wouldn't re-gain flexion, but if the pole had a joint structure like a human but didn't actually use the muscles to push, then it would be similar. 😄)
  • If there was any actual pushing it would show up as a spike in the pressure or force under that foot, when in reality the trail pressure trace is seen decreasing only throughout the late backswing and into the early follow-through.
  • When our trail foot does slip, it slips out behind us because the foot is actually mostly unweighted and because the mild shearing force opposite the direction of rotation (trail hip rotates toward the golf ball, trail foot will often slip out the other direction, force of friction is in the direction of the hip's rotation). It doesn't slip out backward, even if we are standing on a dolly with wheels or a bit of ice. We're still able to get our weight forward - it's rotation that's hampered.
  • Feel ain't real, but don't try to tell that to the OP.

It's not that complicated.

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