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Conditioning Exercises


bones75
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I walk about 20-25 miles a week. Every morning at 5am I get in 2-3 miles of brisk walking over various elevation changes. 

2-3 times a week I will walk 18 holes,  that's about 3.6 miles each. I don't carry my bag, preferring to trolley it. So now I'm up to maybe 32 miles a week.  

Add in another 10 miles or so of golf practicing walks Now I am up to 40+ miles a week. 

There's also  bike rides with my younger Granddaughters.

After every 18 hole round , I am tired. Not worn out tired, just tired. Maybe my knees hurt a little. Maybe my ankle are a little sore. Being tired like this is normal in my book, as long as my recovery time is minimal. As long as I get up the next morning, ready to go again.

I'm married to a retired orthopaedic surgeon, who keeps track of my various aches, and pains. Being tired after a round of golf is pretty normal in her book too. She'd probably recommend to the OP to invest in a trolley if he wants to extend his golf journey. Older age, and golf bag carrying don't go to well with each other.  

Edited by Patch
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3 minutes ago, Vinsk said:

In general maybe. But your stated problem of legs in particular feeling tired and your rotating declines...I wouldn’t favor carrying over a push cart. I think the Docs and the physio are ok with carrying as you seem to really want to do that but I won’t agree it’s doing you better than than the injury/fatigue it’s causing you. Also, there’s a damn good chance your cardiologist isn’t aware of the studies done on the effects of carrying a golf bag. These kids out there aren’t being lazy. It’s what’s recommended now. Just sayin....

I did go over this w/ my sports therapist (pt). I just didn't want to get into it in this thread. Here's all the details:

- If I golf once a week (4hrs) and keep my golfbag under 10% bodyweight, it will ONLY be a healthy exercise for my back. Additional weight on the back for not too long or too often is actually healthy for it. It adds compression as is good for the bones. 

- backpacks are bad for daily use or being overweight

- He agrees that anyone who golfs a lot, like an athlete, should not carry as default.

- He agrees it will fatigue my back for worse performance in golf.

- He treats Stanford's athletes

- He's 100% in favor of increasing my bpm by 10+ for 4 hours at a time, so long as I don't mind the drawbacks (having to watch my posture all the time.. which I admit is tiring)

 

 

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25 minutes ago, bones75 said:

He agrees that anyone who golfs a lot, like an athlete, should not carry as default.

- He agrees it will fatigue my back for worse performance in golf.

And here we still are...

25 minutes ago, bones75 said:

He's 100% in favor of increasing my bpm by 10+ for 4 hours at a time, so long as I don't mind the drawbacks (having to watch my posture all the time.. which I admit is tiring)

Ok, so get a pushcart and walk faster...

 

26 minutes ago, bones75 said:

Additional weight on the back for not too long or too often is actually healthy for it. It adds compression as is good for the bones. 

Your squats and deadlifts should take care of this; no need to carry a bag.

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@ncates00 said it best. Look, you’re doing more than sufficient exercising which I’m sure your cardiologist appreciates. It’s not like you’re a couch potato and you need to elevate your HR while playing golf, your only form of exercise. 
Use a push cart. You’re doing plenty for your general health already. You can spend four hours with 11bpm less and spare your back and hip joints.

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21 minutes ago, Vinsk said:

@ncates00 said it best. Look, you’re doing more than sufficient exercising which I’m sure your cardiologist appreciates. It’s not like you’re a couch potato and you need to elevate your HR while playing golf, your only form of exercise. 
Use a push cart. You’re doing plenty for your general health already. You can spend four hours with 11bpm less and spare your back and hip joints.

Sorry to disappoint!

I'm just gonna do what my medical professionals encourage me to do. It's wild. It's crazy. But I'm a wild and crazy guy...

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58 minutes ago, bones75 said:

Sorry to disappoint!

I'm just gonna do what my medical professionals encourage me to do. It's wild. It's crazy. But I'm a wild and crazy guy...

No disappointment at all. I’m a physician too and wouldn’t encourage you to carry a golf bag especially in light of your issues. Cheers.

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(edited)
2 hours ago, Vinsk said:

No disappointment at all. I’m a physician too and wouldn’t encourage you to carry a golf bag especially in light of your issues. Cheers.

I think I heard that you were a physician before, but forgot. I now better understand your concern and well intentions. Appreciate it.

I have a heart issue and my doctors have given me a (lofty) goal of 300 minutes of 70%+ max HR (high-moderate) exercise per week. I pretty much never hit that because of my work, family etc.. So i'm trying to squeeze in as much as I can. I could give up my golf rounds to do spinning or something and help get there. Instead, I prefer to play golf and just try to max my heart rate while playing.

Independently of the above, when carrying a golf bag as the doctors prescribed (for me: 18lbs, both straps, keep good posture, once a week), I was told it is better for my back health and for my general long term health (and likely help my posture), not vice versa as seems to be your concern.

I don't know what medical literature and studies there are on backpacks and backhealth, but I feel confident that my doctor's recommendations are consistent with it (walking with a golf bag was discussed specifically). If you wish to share any research that is contrary to this, I'd welcome it.

Thanks again for any of your concern.

 

Edited by bones75
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10 hours ago, bones75 said:

I'm just gonna do what my medical professionals encourage me to do. 

So then why not just ask them for "golf conditioning" exercises?

Edited by klineka
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(edited)
5 hours ago, klineka said:

So then why not just ask them for "golf conditioning" exercises?

My statement was addressing the question of whether I should stop carrying. This was not my topic or OP, but it was challenged (understandably*) and consequently took over most of the contents of this thread.

This Feb I got to a place where I could walk/carry 18 holes and feel great. And I loved it (and I even posted on TST about it). I got there after about 14 months of carrying once a week and other fitness stuff. Since then, I took a few months off golf and regressed.

I was seeking advice on how to get back to that physical state faster than it took me the first time (14 months), knowing I only have time to golf once a week, etc.. My OP was poorly written, and regardless, to your point, I'm now thinking about seeing a TPI type guy to make adjustments in my fitness routine w/ more of a focus on golf.

*I do appreciate in particular @Vinsk, who as a physician, with the best of his understanding, simply tried to give me good health guidance. It's wonderful. The fact that his advice is contrary to my doctor is noteworthy, but I don't think differing 2nd opinions from doctors is anything new. In this instance, I trust my doctors more, as I'm sure his patients do likewise with him. (however, if he feels I'm being given unsound or incorrect medical advice to a level approaching malpractice.. then I'm still all ears!)

edit: @klineka: i just realized now I misread your question! which is why the above may seem misdirected. although I eventually did answer your question.

Edited by bones75
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  • 2 weeks later...

This may seem like an obvious suggestion, but why not try going to the golf range every other week instead of playing?

I used to practice at the range alternating clubs like you would on a course (dr, 7, pw, dr, 9, sw, dr, 5, pw etc...), although obviously you wont have the benefit of of walking the distance of a course.

I found that when I used to go through 100 balls at a fair pace my body felt similar to after a round, albeit I was 25ish and pretty fit anyway so the walking was never really an issue due to playing football/soccer twice a week minimum for the 15 years prior but I digress...

 

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4 hours ago, rebelrob said:

This may seem like an obvious suggestion, but why not try going to the golf range every other week instead of playing?

I like the idea, thanks!  Im often oblivious to the obvious.

There are some Saturdays i know i dont have time to even finish 18. Hitting the range sounds like a good option considering. And will leave me time for other golf practice/exercise too.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night so I feel qualified to comment.
@bones75 you stated You’ve talked to a physician and PT about all of this but what about finding a person who specializes in training athletes. A strength coach, particularly one who works with athletes and holds a CSCS, might be able to provide some insight on what you are missing in your training. IMHO, it sounds like you need some more anaerobic training, high intensity training. Someone mentioned kettlebell work.... might be a good place to start. 
But again, I might not have any idea what I am talking about since I haven’t ever trained a recreational golfer. 

Edited by tap2284
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  • 2 months later...

I do three days a week of golf fitness workouts. Here is my program

30 mins of indoor spinning  intervals. 30 secs on / 90 secs off

Dumbbell power clean and press, 5x5. Last two sets at 70-85% of 1rpm.

3 sets of  30 crunches, followed by back extensions. I superset these exercises.

10 mins of stretching.

Edited by kenhockey2
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7 hours ago, kenhockey2 said:

I do three days a week of golf fitness workouts. Here is my program

30 mins of indoor spinning  intervals. 30 secs on / 90 secs off

Dumbbell power clean and press, 5x5. Last two sets at 70-85% of 1rpm.

3 sets of  30 crunches, followed by back extensions. I superset these exercises.

10 mins of stretching.

 

Not a bad start. Do you ever change the conditioning? Strength exercises?

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Hey bones, do core exercises for your lower back, abdominals, and obliques.  If you can manage it, also do proper squats <--does not have to be heavy.  These guys are in just about everything, but particularly so in a golf swing. When these muscles are not pulling their weight (very literally), you tax the auxiliary muscle groups to pick up the slack.  This in turn, tires those muscles out faster.

Good luck.

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