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ryohazuki222

Health Issues with Carrying while walking?

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Have to agree with the push cart crowd. I've had shoulder problems and a pull cart, with the twisting to drag the cart behind me, seemed to aggravate my shoulders. I can carry a lighter bag without too much trouble but might be leaving out some gear. For me a Sun Mountain push cart solved both of these problems.

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Haha.... jeez.... all these super differing opinions is the reason im confused in the first place :/

So far, it seems like a pretty evenly divided topic.... hopefully some more can chime in one way or the other...

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I used to carry when I played the walking only course I went to yesterday. Having to carry it on my back, while doable, just put an unnecessary added strain in me. My feet hurt more by the end, I felt a lot more tired. Lets face it, no matter how fit you are lugging 30 lbs on you back for 4 hours is going to make you more tired than not lugging 30 lbs on your back for 4 hours.

I went out this past weekend and got a Clicgear 2.0 and don't regret a penny of it. I was less tired throughout the round, my feet hurt less, and I was even better hydrated cause of the water bottle I was able to put in the cup holder (yes I used to carry them in my bag, but out of sight out of mind and I usually forgot about them).

I say get the cart. Even with the health issue aside, I think a less-tired body is one more easily focused on making shots.

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If you do it enough, it wont hurt your feet anmore, and will improve your conditioning.

Soldiers March for hours with rucksacks. After while its perfectly normal. While you do get soldiers with foot problems (from years in old combat boots, which are horrible for your bones), but rarely with any back problems.

Good Shoes, good posture, no problem.

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I have considered getting a push cart. My shoulders are sore after a round, even more so after many days in a row. I'm physically in shape, I doubt carrying will have any positive effect, probably more negative. There is also lifting and shifting of weight when you carry it around. I love to carry my bag around, but to protect my back and knees I just might get a push cart.

Statistics is one thing, but it does not matter to the individual. I have played with many in their 30's that have gone from carrying to pushing and never regretted it. Some because of back problems. Any excess strain on the back will wear the body more than no strain. We are supposed to have this body for 80-90 years, taking care of it is important.

I've played 18 holes with a cart and it definately felt better to swing the club without being stiff from carrying a bag.

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I'm just curious, I can't see how you would carry a bag without changing your C of G. By doing this you would have to alter your posture to keep balance.

I can't see how carrying your golf bag would affect your posture. You're only carrying it for limited amount of time, the hours you spend without your bag on your back far outweigh the hours you do have it on. If you were walking around 24/7 with your golf bag on your back then you might have a case but It's not going to happen if you just play golf a couple of times per week.

If you do it enough, it wont hurt your feet anmore, and will improve your conditioning.

That's a great point about the soldiers and they have to carry a whole lot more weight than the average golfer does and have to do it for a whole lot longer. I've always been a firm believer that if you carry your clubs all the time your body gets used to it and you won't have any problems.

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I carry. Always have; (hopefully) always will. I hate the backpack style dual straps as well. People have carried over one shoulder for years and years with no problems what-so-ever. Your back is like any other part of your body i.e. use it/train it/exercise it and you'll have no problems.

I can understand that ride-on carts are maybe needed some places for speed if a course is spread over a big area but other than that I can't see that carrying will be anything but beneficial to overall health.

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I can't see how carrying your golf bag would affect your posture. You're only carrying it for limited amount of time, the hours you spend without your bag on your back far outweigh the hours you do have it on. If you were walking around 24/7 with your golf bag on your back then you might have a case but It's not going to happen if you just play golf a couple of times per week.

I'm talking about both long term and short term posture.

A long term change would happen over time, and would depend on how often you played. If this isn't frequent enough the change will be less noticeable. You wouldn't need to be carrying the bag 24/7 for this to happen, in the same way people get crossed pelvic syndrome without sitting in a chair 24/7. The short term change would be that you are putting your spine and hips in a position they are not designed to be in to accomodate the bag. This would be causing more damage and wear than normal.
That's a great point about the soldiers and they have to carry a whole lot more weight than the average golfer does and have to do it for a whole lot longer. I've always been a firm believer that if you carry your clubs all the time your body gets used to it and you won't have any problems.

A soldier definately isn't a fair comparison.

a) The soldiers keep the pack on for a longer period. They don't keep picking it up putting it down and performing a rotational motion inbetween. b) Look at how a soldiers back pack sits compared to a golf bag. Completely different positon. c) Do soldiers have good posture? I don't know the answer to this, but posture isn't necessarily as important to soldiering as it is to golf. Maybe they have lordotic or kyphotic posture, which causes them no problem but wouldn't be optimal for a golf swing.

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I suggest if you don't believe that carrying a bag "properly" is not hazardous to your health, find a good sports orthopedic doctor, and take his advice, not anyone on this, or any site. Get it straight from a professional whose credentials can be verified.

Frankly, the two strap bags, properly carried, are very comfortable. I would be astonished to have an expert weigh in with a negative on carrying.

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A soldier definately isn't a fair comparison.

Very valid point! Just hauling the bag isn't so bad, it's the repetitive up, down, twist, up down, twist motions that are eliminated by the carts that are also very key. As I said before, I carried for years, I paid over $200 years ago for the first IZZO dual strap bag. If you're gonna carry, the dual strap backpack styles are the absolute best. But, even the best carry bags have nothing on the pushcart. Plus, with wheels, it's so much easier dealing with the scorecard, beverage, club wiping, club pulling, rangefinding, etc, etc., etc. Carrying, been there, done that. Not going back anytime soon. (But I sure don't hate anyone that still carries)

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I am in a very similar situation. I love to walk, carried my bag for the first 8 years I played. I recently had knee surgery and they cut away alot of my meniscus (this is spelled totally wrong). But when I went to PT for it I asked. They said that it would be better on my knees so I bought a push cart. I got a bag boy sc-500. It is very easy to open and close. Only about 15 seconds. I got it barely used off of ebay for 70 dollars. I have used it and I like it. I don't know if it was easier to use and less excercise but it was really handy to have everything right there and don't have to put my bag down and can clean my club while I walking and it just seems a little more handy. I still definitely felt like I got excercise which is good. Hope this helps.

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Depends on your body type. If you have a thicker, more muscular torso you will not even feel the weight of a carry bag.

thats not the case at all. an extra 20 punds is an extra 20 pounds. by the end of the round you will feel it in fatigue.

im not a big fan of carrying, i have a sun mtn speed cart and while i can see that carrying has a macho manly look to it, i always remember that the pros dont carry their bags. someone else does. and while im not a pro and never will be, im not going to do anything that puts extra strain on me. i work out in other ways.

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I've been carrying for years - no problemo.

Some people really pack their bags and put way too much stuff in there. I have a 4 pound bag, 13 clubs, 6 balls, and assorted paraphernalia and that's it, plus water.

Don't they hike 20 miles with a 40 pound backpack in the army?

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I am in a very similar situation. I love to walk, carried my bag for the first 8 years I played. I recently had knee surgery and they cut away alot of my meniscus (this is spelled totally wrong). But when I went to PT for it I asked. They said that it would be better on my knees so I bought a push cart. I got a bag boy sc-500. It is very easy to open and close. Only about 15 seconds. I got it barely used off of ebay for 70 dollars. I have used it and I like it. I don't know if it was easier to use and less excercise but it was really handy to have everything right there and don't have to put my bag down and can clean my club while I walking and it just seems a little more handy. I still definitely felt like I got excercise which is good. Hope this helps.

You're saying pushing as opposed to carrying the bag alleviated some knee strain for you?

I'm actually a tennis player that only started golf not to long ago because I'd pushed my knee too hard from hours and hours of high level tennis on a hard court. I need SOMETHING to do so I took up golf and ended up really liking it. It seems you asked a professional and they said pushing would be better on your knees? If that's the case, i'd say its a good argument for a push cart for me.

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Why is it an argument that soldiers carry heavy backpacks? I'm sure they put excess strain on the back and shoulders by doing so. I agree with someone above here that it would be interesting to hear the opinion from a sports orthopedic doctor.

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Note: This thread is 4013 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

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