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mvmac

Odyssey Reacts to Proposed Anchor Ban with Metal-X Arm Lock Putters

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Odyssey is getting creative with the recent announcement about the proposed anchoring ban.  I would assume the putters have more loft on then your standard putter.  Basically what I said here

ODYSSEY GOLF ANNOUNCES ARM LOCK PUTTERS IN WAKE OF PROPOSED ANCHORING BAN

The #1 Putter in Golf Set to Debut Two Metal-X Arm Lock Putters, Alternatives that Promote Stable and Consistent Putting

CARLSBAD, Calif., November 30, 2012-- Odyssey®, the #1 Putter in Golf®, today announced the upcoming release of the new Metal-X™ Arm Lock Putters. Just days after the sports’ ruling bodies - the USGA and the R&A; - proposed a ban on the anchoring method of putting, Odyssey introduces a product line that both conforms to the anticipated ruling and offers an alternative method of stabilizing the putter through a natural-feeling extension of the golfer’s arm.

Odyssey’s pledge to gofers has always been to push convention while respecting tradition in a quest to help them sink more putts. The Metal–X Arm Lock Putters stem from extensive exploration into the different ways Tour professionals interact with the putter.

“We have been working toward solutions for the proposed ban on the anchoring technique for some time now, and working with our Tour players, have identified an alternative and Tour-proven putting method,” said Chris Koske, Global Director, Odyssey Golf. “We’re now moving quickly to deliver the Arm Lock products that promote a stable and consistent putting stroke for both Professionals and amateur golfers.”

The Odyssey Metal-X Arm Lock Putter will be available initially in two models, the Metal-X #7 and the Metal-X DART. The specs of these two putters have been optimized through research and testing, and allow golfers to extend the shaft and grip up their lead forearm for consistent performance and control through the stroke.

“At Odyssey we were adamant about offering alternative solutions to golfers whomight change their current technique based on the recent anchoring proposal,” said Austie Rollinson, Principal Designer, Odyssey Golf. “We have more Tour players around the world playing and winning withOdyssey putters than any other company; we worked closely with many of them to dial in the new Arm Lock Putters to ensure they perform at the highest level.”

The Arm Lock Putter will be available at retail in January 2013 for a new product introduction retail price of $189.99 (US). For more information about Odyssey products, please visit http://www.odysseygolf.com/

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Keegan Bradley was trying out the arm lock putting style yesterday after his round at the TW.  I cant understand why they dont just have a maximum length for clubs that can be taken onto the putting green, thats the easy solution.

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According to Odyssey, 7 degrees of loft to account for 4 degrees of forward press.

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Keegan Bradley was trying out the arm lock putting style yesterday after his round at the TW.  I cant understand why they dont just have a maximum length for clubs that can be taken onto the putting green, thats the easy solution.

Because you can still use a broomstick on the green without anchoring it. Limiting the length also means you can't use longer clubs if you happen to break or lose your putter.

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Is there a reason people couldn't use this technique with their regular long putter and just move the ball closer towards the target?
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Originally Posted by billchao

Is there a reason people couldn't use this technique with their regular long putter and just move the ball closer towards the target?

No reason other than making adjustment for the loft on the putter. If you put the shaft against the forearm then you've created a significant foreword press that will deloft the putter. You can move the ball foreword in your stance but this is a bit of a comprimise.  Odyssey's "armlock" putters are said to be 7 degreees of loft and more common loft on putters is 2 or 3 degrees since they are designed to be used vertically or with some minor foreward press.

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Originally Posted by billchao

Is there a reason people couldn't use this technique with their regular long putter and just move the ball closer towards the target?

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigwave916

No reason other than making adjustment for the loft on the putter. If you put the shaft against the forearm then you've created a significant foreword press that will deloft the putter. You can move the ball foreword in your stance but this is a bit of a comprimise.  Odyssey's "armlock" putters are said to be 7 degreees of loft and more common loft on putters is 2 or 3 degrees since they are designed to be used vertically or with some minor foreward press.

Yeah there needs to be a certain amount of loft on a putter for it to roll optimally.  Moving the ball too far forward could start to effect the contact.

I wonder if Odyssey is making an adjustment with the face angle other than the loft, more you forward press it, face will tend to be aimed more to the right.  Having 7 degrees of loft probably takes care of that.  From what I've heard, players that use a Dave Stockton-esque stroke aim left, forward press  and "push" their putts online.  Push from the face, not the path I think Stockton recommends 5-6 degrees of loft for a standard putter, using his technique.

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Originally Posted by mvmac

Yeah there needs to be a certain amount of loft on a putter for it to roll optimally.  Moving the ball too far forward could start to effect the contact.

I wonder if Odyssey is making an adjustment with the face angle other than the loft, more you forward press it, face will tend to be aimed more to the right.  Having 7 degrees of loft probably takes care of that.  From what I've heard, players that use a Dave Stockton-esque stroke aim left, forward press  and "push" their putts online.  Push from the face, not the path  I think Stockton recommends 5-6 degrees of loft for a standard putter, using his technique.

I've seen so many people deloft putters and scoot the ball the first six inches that I've always tried to strike the ball so that it rolls immediately off the putter face without the skid and bounce that you get when delofting the putter.  However, I've seen some pretty good putters who use a foreward press.  Are you saying that they probably are using putters with more loft?  Before I knew that putters had loft I just putted with what felt good....now what feels good to me is a putter with 3 degrees or less loft.

I get what you mean about face angle adjustment because when I take one of my putters and put the grip against my forearm the face rolls open and the toe comes up.  From what I've seen in the pictures of the Metal X Arm Lock putter the hozel is long and canted backward instead of being vertical.  Wouldn't this put the face in the proper orientation?

Also, I thought push was path related. I see you put push in parenthesis and also the emoticon "wink"  What did I miss there?

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Originally Posted by bigwave916

I've seen so many people deloft putters and scoot the ball the first six inches that I've always tried to strike the ball so that it rolls immediately off the putter face without the skid and bounce that you get when delofting the putter.  However, I've seen some pretty good putters who use a foreward press.  Are you saying that they probably are using putters with more loft?  Before I knew that putters had loft I just putted with what felt good....now what feels good to me is a putter with 3 degrees or less loft.

I can't say what those players are doing but the putter has to have some loft.  I can guarantee Matt Kuchar is using a putter with 7-8 degrees of loft.

Originally Posted by bigwave916

I get what you mean about face angle adjustment because when I take one of my putters and put the grip against my forearm the face rolls open and the toe comes up.  From what I've seen in the pictures of the Metal X Arm Lock putter the hozel is long and canted backward instead of being vertical.  Wouldn't this put the face in the proper orientation?

Yeah that hosel design is different.  Not sure exactly.  Will try to find out more info when it becomes available to us.

Originally Posted by bigwave916

Also, I thought push was path related. I see you put push in parenthesis and also the emoticon "wink"  What did I miss there?

For putting, face angle accounts for something like 96% of the balls start line.  I may be off a few percentage points but you get the idea.  Same thing when we refer to a push draw, the "push" is coming from the face being aimed to the right at impact, not the path.

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What do you think the chances are that the Arm Lock putter will not only convert the anchored belly and broomstick guys but will also convince a lot of the "conventional" putters to switch from the shorter putter?  I'm seriously thinking about picking up one of the new Odyssey's when they hit the store in January. The idea of putting with the leading arm straight or closer to straight makes a lot of sense to me.  Before this I wouldn't own a putter that was longer than 34" and currently have my three favorite putters at 33 1/2"

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Originally Posted by bigwave916

What do you think the chances are that the Arm Lock putter will not only convert the anchored belly and broomstick guys but will also convince a lot of the "conventional" putters to switch from the shorter putter?  I'm seriously thinking about picking up one of the new Odyssey's when they hit the store in January. The idea of putting with the leading arm straight or closer to straight makes a lot of sense to me.  Before this I wouldn't own a putter that was longer than 34" and currently have my three favorite putters at 33 1/2"

I prefer a little float load in my putting stroke so I cannot see going to the Arm Lock.

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Originally Posted by bigwave916

What do you think the chances are that the Arm Lock putter will not only convert the anchored belly and broomstick guys but will also convince a lot of the "conventional" putters to switch from the shorter putter?  I'm seriously thinking about picking up one of the new Odyssey's when they hit the store in January. The idea of putting with the leading arm straight or closer to straight makes a lot of sense to me.  Before this I wouldn't own a putter that was longer than 34" and currently have my three favorite putters at 33 1/2"

Not sure about belly guys going to the Arm Lock, it's a different feel and a different "release" for lack of a better term.  Maybe if you went to a belly because of nerves/jitters.  The left wrist for a belly can be softer and bend while the Arm Lock has a more rigid, hence the term "lock", left wrist.

Good video here, wish we could see Kuchar from face on.  Notice how hit path is consistently to the right because the handle is forward.  Should be a "Swing Thought" post on this

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Originally Posted by saevel25

Were can i get a putter fitting like that :)

Erie PA ;-)  Edel Golf, SAM puttlab

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Leave it to the USGA to make a rule to allow one type of anchoring, Matt Kucher style, but not allow another, Keegan Bradley style. I do think it is pretty funny that this putter is being named "Metal-X Arm Lock Putter" though I would have liked "Metal-X Arm Anchored putter better.

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I don't understand why they don't just make the rule "you can only hold the club with your hands". Been wondering this for a while actually.
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Originally Posted by hampshire2012

I don't understand why they don't just make the rule "you can only hold the club with your hands". Been wondering this for a while actually.

Because Adam Scott "only holds the club with his hands" and that's still deemed to be prohibited under the proposed change.

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