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stevenlsmith

Blades or Game Improvement Irons??

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Hey,

I am looking to buy a new set of irons.  I know that the main thing for me to ever improve my game is to get lessons, but I need clubs to play and take lessons with.  My question is would it be better to buy a set of GI irons, or skip that and go straight to blade irons?  I know that GI irons are way more forgiving and being a relatively new player that would be very helpful, but I don't want it to handicap myself by relying on my GI irons and never really learning how to work the ball.  My question is would it be better to buy blade irons and have lessons with them or slowly work up to them?  I want to enjoy the game when I play and am afraid blade irons may just frustrate me.  What did you guys start out with??

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rocky74    1

If you are a high capper, I would start with SGI irons.  I'm painfully average, and thought I could handle GI clubs, I was wrong (even with lessons).

There is a clearly defined line between having fun with golf, and not.  The GI clubs made my whole season a mess.  I had zero confidence/consistency from 160 yds and under.  It gets very frustrating after a couple months of this, trust me.

Fast forward to the SGI clubs the following season, and I was able to have fun again - I shaved 6 off my handicap from the previous season.  Nobody cares about what clubs you are using when your ball flight and accuracy are good.  I feel like golf is much more rewarding for me now.  Maybe someday I will be good enough to hit GI clubs, maybe not.  For now, I'm loving my game and I'm not changing a thing.

Good luck to you in your search for new irons.  I would also like to recommend trying the Taylormade Burner Plus.  They have changed my game, and a couple of my friends as well.  And get 2 hybrids - my 3 & 4 hybrids are my most confident clubs now.

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Zeph    182
I would recommend SGI or GI. I got muscle back irons myself at a high handicap, but in hindsight, I'd go for something more forgiving. The difference can be quite substantial, especially for a high handicap player. A low handicapper won't have trouble using more forgiving clubs, but a high handicapper may struggle more than necessary. For someone just starting golf, I think it's important to make sure golf is fun. Using less forgiving clubs may have some effect on your progress, but I don't think it's worth it. There is no problem improving with more forgiving clubs. My best advice is to find a golf store where you can get custom fit. You may not have too much reference points or know how to evaluate different clubs and shafts, but the fitter will help you a lot in finding a suitable set. Do yourself and your game a favor and get fit for something that suits your level. There are professionals out there playing big cavity back irons.

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clearwaterms    14

One thing to remember is that a good swing will make a good ball flight, and accordingly a bad swing regardless of the club is going to produce a bad result.

The easiest clubs to hit, are still difficult if you don't put a good swing on it.

Also, unless you are (not would like to be, but legitimately already is) a single digit handicap, consistently hitting the ball a known distance and straight is the ONLY thing you should be worrying about.  If you know how to hit the ball straight, learning to work the ball is easy.

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PirateJim    28
Golf is a hard enough game even with the clubs that make it easier. In my very humble opinion until a persons handicap dips into single digits the only "shot shaping" they really need to worry about is Straight! And at that point you will likely find shots can be shaped with GI irons.

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Originally Posted by PirateJim

Golf is a hard enough game even with the clubs that make it easier. In my very humble opinion until a persons handicap dips into single digits the only "shot shaping" they really need to worry about is Straight! And at that point you will likely find shots can be shaped with GI irons.

I think the same thing can be said for getting fit for a set of clubs as opposed to buying off the rack or used. Until your swing is consistently straight and the ball flight is too, you would be better off taking lessons first. I started out three years ago with some of the irons I have now...I have changed woods, driver, and some irons to hybrids. I also have a set of GI irons but I don't use them much. I have tried all kinds of clubs at the dealer's but they don't seem to improve my hitting enough to even think about spending more money, not if I want to stay married that is.

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Hollister    3

Ditto. Buy a used or new blade from the bay and (try to) have fun with it. It will either teach you a little humility or make you concentrate more on hitting the ball right. I bought one 6 iron off ebay last Summer - now I own three sets of blades, which are really tiny compared to my GI irons. And soooo beautiful. Bought them all used, for little money and they do play great.

But for a turney I would always go back to a little more forgiving club (I think ).

Have fun!

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So from what I have gathered is that I should just stick with my old x20 irons and just focus on lessons.  I was just thinking that the new SGI irons would help just a little more, but I could be wrong.

I live in the Philly area.....anybody in the area know where I can take lessons?  The only place I can think of is Golf Galaxy and I am unsure on how well their lessons are.  Any input would be great!  I may buy a single blade iron to just give it a shot and mess with one.

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Tincupgamer    0

I started playing golf with some old blades that I got from my dad and played through high school.  I stopped playing for 10 years and picked up the game again at 28.  A lot had changed in the game of golf in those 10 years so I bought a set of Big Bertha irons because they were all the rage in 1994 :)  And while the did help my game, I noticed it was only for a short period of time.  I got myself down into the mid 80's and I was stuck.  A friend/instructor suggested I switch to a smaller club and continue to work on my swing.  I put a set of Titleist 962's in the bag and I won't lie it was a tough month or so after that.  But soon there after I started getting more club on the ball, which spilt over to my other clubs as well ie driver and 3 wood. I think it was about 5 months after I switched I broke 80 for the first time.

I believe the only way to become a better player is to know what you are doing wrong.  The feedback you get from a smaller head club is valuable information if you plan on improving.

I am currently playing a combo set Titleist 712CB 2-6 iron, and 712MB 7-PW

I hope you find what you are looking for, whichever set you choose.  :)

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mosnas    1
Originally Posted by stevenlsmith

So from what I have gathered is that I should just stick with my old x20 irons and just focus on lessons.  I was just thinking that the new SGI irons would help just a little more, but I could be wrong.

I live in the Philly area.....anybody in the area know where I can take lessons?  The only place I can think of is Golf Galaxy and I am unsure on how well their lessons are.  Any input would be great!  I may buy a single blade iron to just give it a shot and mess with one.

Well that really depends, X20 irons are probably my second favorite irons I have ever hit (2nd only to my current set).  They offer the best of both worlds with the forgiveness of a SGI but they have a shape that is more similar to Players Irons.  To be honest a bad swing is a bad swing, if you hit a SGI with a bad swing the result will not be as good as if you hit it pure.

Stick with the X20 irons they are a good club and if you find after a few year your skills greatly improve and you want to start shaping shots or step up to players irons then definately do that.  Also if you are looking to really max out your X20 irons get them fitted properly, a proper shaft and length will go a long way and will really help your game.

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I guess the question is just now where to get lessons.  I can either go to the local public course and get lessons with their PGA certified guy, or Golf Galaxy.  One uses video, and one is an actual course.....both would be great, but can only afford one.  Any input?

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14ledo81    186
Originally Posted by stevenlsmith

I guess the question is just now where to get lessons.  I can either go to the local public course and get lessons with their PGA certified guy, or Golf Galaxy.  One uses video, and one is an actual course.....both would be great, but can only afford one.  Any input?

I see you are from SE Penn.  Maybe try the guys from NE Penn.

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clearwaterms    14
Originally Posted by stevenlsmith

I guess the question is just now where to get lessons.  I can either go to the local public course and get lessons with their PGA certified guy, or Golf Galaxy.  One uses video, and one is an actual course.....both would be great, but can only afford one.  Any input?

You might want to see if anybody offers group lessons.  Also, consider a book to read on the fundamentals.  Ben Hogan's five lessons is a great start.

if the only options are Golf Galaxy and the local course, I would say try both.  Take a single lesson from each, speak to the instructor, get a sense for which one you can relate with better.

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