Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Socrates

Help, Hybrids Not for Me?

16 posts in this topic

I find it hard to believe that an average golfer like myself couldn't benefit from a hybrid, but I went today and...

Anyone had an experience of hitting a hybrid and having it only go as far as your 6 iron? I hit ball after ball today with a RBZ stage 2 rescue 3 19 degree and that was the outcome. I could have sworn the monitor was off so I grabbed a bunch of irons and they were spot on and consistent with my distances. Baffled as the hybrid made it feel as though the ball was flying off the face and they had a very straight flight. Moved is back in my stance, up in my stance, moved closer, backed away. Same result every time; easy to hit straight from any of those positions, but a consistent distance 30-40 yards shorter that what I hit my 3 iron.

Thoughts?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Want to get rid of this advertisement? Sign up (or log in) today! It's free!

There are lots of variations on hybrids out there. First time I played a hybrid it just didn't work - a 3H, it was great out of the rough, but did whatever it wanted from the tee or the fairway.

I later found I could hit an Adams pro head (can't remember model) and a Callaway Edge Tour hybrid OK, as long as they had an R flex shaft. I didn't have trouble hooking like I did with standard hybrid heads with more offset.

Advantage of hybrids is a shorter shaft for better control, and (usually) a smaller head than FWs for moving through the rough (less resistance). Advantage of FWs is more distance (longer shaft) and generally more bulge on the clubface. Bulge is the left-to-right horizontal arc that spins toe and heel hits back toward center.

Most golfers find hybrids work better if you hit down on them like an iron, rather than sweeping them.

Check around on hybrids, try more than just the TMs. You might try Nickent, the "Mr. Hybrid" company that went out of business, but was resurrected last year. Adams also leads in hybrids.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Bad shaft?

I like the Stage 2's but they are getting re-shafted.

Try the Adams Super S or LS and Titleist 913. The Nike has a lot of adjustability, too.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Try Titleist 913h and Ping are a different animal you might give them a swing. They inspire confidence.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I had the same issues, I tried a lot of hybrids, Callaway, Ping, Adams, Cobra, Mizuno and didn't like any of them.  Then I tried a TaylorMade rescue club and found that one worked for me.  So try a variety of hybrids, if you are set on having one, I think you will find one that you like but you will have to try several different models.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I reckon I got lucky on my hybrid additions. The ones I own are the only ones I have ever hit. I bought them from a friend and he let me try them before I bought them. I got the 3 first then wend back and got the 4. I hit both a good deal further than the respective irons. I play them around my forward heel most of the time and for some reason focus on keeping my head very still.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on your swing style too.  If you have an upright swing, the hybrid might balloon and land short.  I find that a swing plane in between a 3 wood sweep and a 5 iron works for me.  I know some people that just cannot hit hybrids.  I suspect it is because they only know two swings - fairway wood and irons.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Driving irons like the MP Fli Hi, Callaway X Utility and Adams DHY might suit your better.  I can't stand hybrids and much prefer the beefed up iron appearance of the clubs mentioned.  You will likely suffer a bit with the performance from the rough when you get to the 18* 2 iron range but otherwise I love them and that's what I'll play as opposed to hybrids.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hybrids are funny like that so you're not the only one.  But I generally classify them in 3 categories.

Mini woods - The majority of hybrids out there. Head just looks like a smaller version of a fairway wood.  They have more sole camber like woods, little to no offset.  (RBZ, Superfast, JPX825, Xhot, Anser, ..etc)  These are for those looking to replace their fairway woods with something shorter and easier to hit, typically you'd swing these much like you would with a fw. Much like a fw, they do best in a better lie scenario.

Driving irons - (H4, 712U) Less common and usually for players who already hit their long irons fairly well but would like something more forgiving or a bit easier to get more air on them.  They just look like a bulkier version of an iron, flatter soles, little bit of offset..etc.  Usually the same or only 1/2" longer than its iron counterpart.  You swing these much like an iron, slightly steeper approach, hitting down on it a bit more than you would with a "mini wood".

Utility Hybrids -  (G20, Super 9031, original TM rescues)  These have face much like an iron with a slight bulge in the back like a wood.  These types are more utility than anything.  Mid to higher cappers tend to benefit from these because its a very in the middle of the road type of club.  They also work fairly well out of light rough.  Variations in swings like if they sweep it too much or hit down on them too steep, it stays rather forgiving and keeps the ball out of serious trouble.

Ofcourse these lines are very blurred but when looking for a hybrid, I think the first thing you want to ask yourself is what you are trying to replace.  Are you looking for an easier to hit woods for those long approach shots, or are you a descent irons player looking for a slight edge, or a little bit of both with something that can be your long range club to get you out of trouble.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hybrids ... they're different for each of us as the answers above attest.

I think the most useful ones out of rough have a rounded sole without a large footprint -- see the Callaway Hybrids (2013) or Bobby Jones Hybrids (especially the older versions).

As to lofts, I am a low speed player so I look for a hybrid in lofts that are 21 and above. Anything below that and I'm searching for a fairway.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I am done with hybrids myself, I am just too inconsistent with them.  Have had the G20 4i iron in the bag this year and love it.  Got rid of my i20 hybrid today and bought the G20 3i to match.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

My Titleist 910H 21* (3i equivalent) has always been consistant from either the rough or fairway, it is definitely my 200 yard go to club.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks all for the replies...long story short, I ended up buying the TM R11 Rescue...the guy at Golfsmith was insistent on me trying all the $200 hybrids when I finally just told him to go get the R11 that was on sale. $80 later I'm happy and have a decent 200 yd club that I can rely on (and the best one I hit in the bay). I've only had a it out a few times so far, but I'm getting used to the shape and swing plane I need to make it work.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by Socrates

I find it hard to believe that an average golfer like myself couldn't benefit from a hybrid, but I went today and...

Anyone had an experience of hitting a hybrid and having it only go as far as your 6 iron? I hit ball after ball today with a RBZ stage 2 rescue 3 19 degree and that was the outcome. I could have sworn the monitor was off so I grabbed a bunch of irons and they were spot on and consistent with my distances. Baffled as the hybrid made it feel as though the ball was flying off the face and they had a very straight flight. Moved is back in my stance, up in my stance, moved closer, backed away. Same result every time; easy to hit straight from any of those positions, but a consistent distance 30-40 yards shorter that what I hit my 3 iron.

Thoughts?

That's strange, hybrids are made so they give you more distance on the lower lofted clubs. The reason is that amateurs can't produce the club head speed to get a good gap with there long irons. So they end up with 2-3 clubs that they hit about the same distance.

You might be really mis-hitting the hybrid. For me, i hit the hybrid like my long irons, a slightly descending blow, very shallow divot.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I too just purchased the R11 on sale at Golfsmith, the 16* but I dialed it down to 15.5 as soon as I bought it. What loft did you get?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

18 degree and I haven't messed with the loft. I still carry my 15.5 3 wood; if anything I may adjust it up. I'm learning to hit it right now and will have a better feel for it in a week or so.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • 2016 TST Partners

    GAME Golf
    PING Golf
    Lowest Score Wins
  • Popular Now

  • Posts

    • The course with my absolute favorite greens is Eaton Country Club which, despite the name, is far cheaper golf than most courses. A membership is something around $100 a month with no initiation fee or food requirement if I remember correctly. Play golf once a week and you're paying only $25 a round with cart for 18 holes, which is a far better deal than any other course in the area (the 9 hole course I work at is the cheapest in my city at $25 for 9 holes with cart). The greens at this course stimp between 11 and 12 on a daily basis and are the smoothest that I've ever set foot on. Their maintenance crew is fantastic about fixing every little imperfection in the greens. They go over them with a fine-toothed comb every evening to fix anything on the green.  I know there must be some kind of limit to how much play a green like this could sustain, but the course has looked this way every time I've played it (including weekends, weekdays, and such). It's not an enormously busy golf course though, and I don't think it would work on the courses that regularly see 200 or more golfers. I would be willing to bet good money though that, given equal traffic, good maintenance will definitely produce a much higher quality putting surface. The course I used to work for had two people assigned to fix ball marks on the course once a week, both of which had issues with their backs that made bending over for any extended period of time uncomfortable. The greens at that course clearly showed it, with unfixed or only partially fixed ball marks marring every putting surface. The course I currently work at has a maintenance crew that fixes marks whenever they're out to water as well as marshalls that are assigned a couple of holes to maintain during their shifts and I notice that the greens here have many fewer ball marks across the greens. The maintenance crew is also diligent when it comes to regularly verticutting, needle-tining, etc. all of the greens to ensure that they're in top shape. They water the greens up to four times a day depending on the weather conditions as compared to the old course only watering in the evenings and sometimes mornings to save money. As a result the greens at my current course are much more lush and smooth than those at the course I used to work and play at, and I know the difference is the care and attention to the maintenance of the greens (they have similar player traffic).
    • To clarify, I have a push cart. I don't have an umbrella, yet. That probably would have done loads of good keeping the sun from beating down on me. I've got one picked out, but just haven't pulled the trigger yet.  Shooting an 86 was a "decent" to "good" round for me. I felt like I played well. My ball striking was above average today. I had 7 GIR and 7 nGIR. I had 37 putts today, which was my score killer. Oddly enough, most of my 3 putts were on my GIRs! I say this because in the super heat I would think that ball striking would be the first to go, but it didn't for me. Putting was mainly because I'm still working on breaking old habits I had with my old putter and moving to my new putter. Lines were always spot on but I would go back to "popping" the ball like I did with my old putter and would lose it way past the hole.  Definitely need to pick up that umbrella. I imagine that would help a ton. I'm 28 years old and in pretty darn good health/shape and I would have probably died had I actually carried my bag today... lol. Even my lighter "carry" bag.
    • For irons, last year at a Titleist fitting they said I should get the AP1's with the XP 90 gram shaft with a +1/2.  This year I did another free open fitting and they said they wouldn't need to adjust the shaft but I don't remember what shaft they recommended.  Just got fit for a driver last Thursday but i don't think that helps. Scheduled a fitting for Saturday afternoon but who knows if the clubs will still be available then. 
    • I would say nicer golf courses tend to have better greens because of the money it takes to maintain them.  I would say that greens that can routinely hold up to being cut short probably have a healthier denser grass with stronger root systems that allow it to resist damage from pitch marks. I've played on course in Dayton where a pitch mark will just tear up the green versus another course where it just leaves a slight indentation. 
    • Give that man an icy cold beer, stat! I'm relatively young, and I'd take the cart for the breeze between shots and holes as well as the portable shade. What's the point in suffering unless you are practicing for competition in similar conditions? For anyone, I think the physical metabolic toll of moving all that water through to stay cool would tend to lower scores. But you do get longer drives than typical playing conditions, and you may feel extra limber. Older folks face potential heat stroke risk, because they aren't as efficient with heat regulation as a healthy adult. If you are healthy and that's your only day free to play, why not.
  • TST Blog Entries

  • Images

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. chriswuk
      chriswuk
      (25 years old)
    2. Gero
      Gero
      (73 years old)
    3. SUPGolfer
      SUPGolfer
      (46 years old)
  • Blog Entries