jamer8

Why do my Hands hurt after playing a round of Golf?

15 posts in this topic

Let me start by saying I'm not a great Golfer but love the game.

I have this problem at the end of the round and days after.

The problem is my hands hurt afterwards.

Does anyone know what this could be?

Am I gripping to tight?

I really don't know.

All help would be appreciated.

Thanks!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Want to get rid of this advertisement? Sign up (or log in) today! It's free!

Don't use your hands, buy some clubs to hit the ball with.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

It is a soreness or is the pain in your skin?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

The top of my hand and it sometimes goes up in the forearm.

Mostly right hand.

The pain is not in the skin so I would say soreness.

Thanks.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My advice for the grip would be to make sure the meaty part of your right hand index finger, the first joint of the bottom hand index finger where it touches the grip, is on the aft side of the shaft, on the side of the shaft rather than under or on top.  If it is.  Others would have more info on arthritis if it is something like that.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades



Originally Posted by jamer8

Let me start by saying I'm not a great Golfer but love the game.

I have this problem at the end of the round and days after.

The problem is my hands hurt afterwards.

Does anyone know what this could be?

Am I gripping to tight?

I really don't know.

All help would be appreciated.

Thanks!!



What kind of clubs are you using? Poor contact hurts. Maybe try something a little more forgiving wrt impact and the resulting vibrations. Als check your grips. Are they worn and require you to hold the club very tightly? Poor impact can also lead to subconsciously gripping tighter in order to keep the club face travelling on the intended target line.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive actually had a little left hand pain recently, kinda in the pad underneath my pinky. Is this from too strong of a left hand grip?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had pain when I first started playing.  I switched to graphite shaft clubs and it went away.  I do believe it was due to poor contact and could probably start using steel shafts now that I'm a bit better at contacting the ball properly.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You say top of your hand and sometimes into the forearm? Is it on the top of the hand near the pinky finger? If so, then it might be the Ulnar Nerve. If its the top of the hand and pain going into the wrist and into the forearms, it might be just weak wrist muscles. I never had this problem, but it sounds like muscle strain. So not sure if your grip is wrong, or you might have just hurt it and not given it enough rest before playing again. My best advice, Ice it ever few hours, take a week off from golf, and do some light stretching of the wrist. Before you play golf again, make sure you stretch out the wrist, Just move them up and down, rotate them, just get them warmed up before swinging that first time.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Let me help....Hold the club lighter within your hands. You may have read about Sam Snead's comparison of grip pressure as holding a baby bird in your hands, measure of pressure.

Maintain this lighter grip pressure at the start and maintained consistently throughout the entire swing.

Also check to see if you have excess wear on your lower right side of golf glove (for right handers).

If so, this indicates a change in your grip pressure somewhere in your golf swing.

A few last things to check...If you are taking large divots often, this will eventually cause pain. (You are overly steep in your downswing.)

As will constantly hitting off-center shots that seem to make the shaft reverberate in your hands.

A golf lesson would be in order to correct the last two issues.

Hope this helps!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me help....Hold the club lighter within your hands. You may have read about Sam Snead's comparison of grip pressure as holding a baby bird in your hands, measure of pressure.

Maintain this lighter grip pressure at the start and maintained consistently throughout the entire swing.

I don't really care for that advice. The club is swinging 100 MPH or whatever: you're not going to hold on to the thing if you grip it like a baby bird.

Golf pros have strong hands from hitting balls. Their "3" on a scale of 1-10 is an "8" on some people's scales.

I wrote more about this here:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

If I grip too lightly I will increase my grip pressure in transition, which is bad, so I usually try to match my grip pressure at set up with the pressure my body naturally likes to apply at transition so that, hopefully, I won't need to increase it in transition.

YMMV.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades


You used the term "firm", which is not the same as "tight", and tight is how most amateurs grip the club. Looking at one's glove for wear can indicate re-gripping and an overly tight grip. Tight grips also restrict the release that in turn results in disappointing contact.  A firm grip is indeed one that allows a player to have confidence in the connection between his/her hands and the club. That confidence leads to freedom in the swing. "Holding a bird" might have worked for Sam Snead, but if the rest of us had his fluidity, agility, and timing, we too would be winners on tour.  He was; we're not, so finding the correct grip pressure is mostly a matter of a confident swing. One may get that swing with lessons and practice or lots of play (some people get better on the course, others on the range). Firm is good.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You used the term "firm", which is not the same as "tight", and tight is how most amateurs grip the club. Looking at one's glove for wear can indicate re-gripping and an overly tight grip.

The re-gripping is more of a result of improper placement of the grip in the hands. If the grip isn't secure the player has to make some last minute adjustments.

"Holding a bird" might have worked for Sam Snead, but if the rest of us had his fluidity, agility, and timing, we too would be winners on tour.  He was; we're not, so finding the correct grip pressure is mostly a matter of a confident swing.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • 2016 TST Partners

    GAME Golf
    PING Golf
    Lowest Score Wins
  • Posts

    • The progressive wing of the Dem party hates Kaine. He is pro TPP and favors deregulation to wall street. However he brings in VA and has a solid record on many issues for moderate Dems.
      I would not be surprised if you see Bernie speak at the DNC. He will tell his supporters that even though HRC is not their first choice he (Bernie) will have a better chance of working with  her for their issues, than DT! I hear they are countering Baio with prime time slot speech from Erin Moran!!!!!
    • Newtogolf's post is important.  I do not like hanging around people that are used to having a staff.  I just went on a raft trip with a friend of almost 50 years.  We do our own trips, and it is important for everyone to pitch in as it is a lot of work for guys in their 60s.  My friend just retired from being a doctor, and never really figured out how to help for the good of the group. He kept wanting to consider himself a "guest."   That is after we had some long discussions about being part of the team.  He will not be invited back. I would not want to play golf with people that are used to having a caddy either.   
    • Most double bogies, especially from the average golfer don't come from "taking risks", they come from a poor swing that results in OB, water hazard, lost in the woods, whatever.  A decent player can still break 80 with a double or two for exactly that reason, it's only a couple of bad swings.   The reason that most golfers never break 80 is that they make a lot of those bad swings, that add up.  But even good golfers, who break 80 (or better) consistently, will have the occasional bad swing that will result in a penalty and subsequently a double, or worse.   Which is "harder" is a matter of skill level. For me, someone who, as the OP asked, is as likely to break 80 as not, if I had to bet on the result of any given round before the first tee, I'd bet that I break 80 over a DB free round of any score.  Higher handicap players will find the opposite.  Scratch or better players will seldom fail to break 80, but will still have their share of individual blowup holes.  They'll just use their superior play on the remaining 16 or 17 holes to offset the couple of bad swings. 
    • I don't know enough about his situation.  Maybe not immediately -- he wouldn't qualify for the PGA Championship or the FedEx Cup playoffs (you can't earn points as a non-member, which he is for this event).  But probably by end of summer to start the 2016-17 PGA Tour season as a member.  Unless I'm forgetting someone, he'd be the third amateur to win a PGA Tour event in my lifetime (Verplank, Mickelson). 
    • Thanks.  I figured I would have heard by now if it made a difference, but I'm glad to hear it just the same. I tee off in just over three hours for my first round with the game golf.  
  • TST Blog Entries

  • Images

  • Today's Birthdays

  • Blog Entries